Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Arts in African American and African Diaspora Studies and History (AAADHISTBA)Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Interdepartmental Bachelor of Arts in African American and African Diaspora Studies and History examines the experiences of people of African descent in the United States and throughout the world. The interdisciplinary approach in this combined major will provide students with a unique way of studying the history of the African diaspora.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 40 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. African American and African Diaspora Studies Courses. 18 credit hours, of which at least 12 credit hours must be at the 300 level or above, from the list below:
    1. Introductory course. One (1) course from the .
      • Required for the major. The culture of blacks in America viewed from a broad interdisciplinary approach, employing resources from history, literature, folklore, religion, sociology, and political science. (3 credit hours.)
    2. African American History. One (1) course from the .
      • History of blacks in the United States. Slavery, abolitionism, Reconstruction, and post-Reconstruction to 1900. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 355 or HIST-A 355. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: AAAD-A 355. 1900 to the present. Migration north, NAACP, Harlem Renaissance, postwar freedom movement. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 356 or HIST-A 356. (3 credit hours.)
    3. African American Literature. One (1) course from the .
      • African American writing before World War II, with emphasis on critical reactions and analyses. Includes slave narratives, autobiographies, rhetoric, fiction, and poetry. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: AAAD-A 379. The black experience in America as it has been reflected since World War II in the works of outstanding African American writers: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. (3 credit hours.)
    4. History, Culture, and Social Issues*. Nine (9) credit hours from the .
      • P: Groups student; and residence in Atkins Living Learning Center. Examines the impact of African American history and culture on the nation as a whole and on the international community. (1 credit hour.)
      • Exploration of the development of racism and racial ideologies in the United States, the Caribbean, Latin America, and South America from colonial times to the present. Emphasizes the interaction among cultural, political, and economic factors in shaping patterns of conflict and collaboration, domination and resistance. (3 credit hours.)
      • A comparative perspective on American race relations, specifically the similarities and differences of the struggles against Jim Crow in America and against apartheid in South Africa. In both places, the late twentieth century witnessed a revolt against the legal and philosophical framework of white supremacy. (3 credit hours.)
      • A comparative study of the cultural, historical, and socioeconomic life patterns of African Americans and Diaspora-based Africans in the United States. (3 credit hours.)
      • The course will explore black participation in the formal structures of American government and in the processes by which these structures are accessed. Black participation in local, state, and federal government arenas will be focused upon, and the political benefits to the black community of these involvements will be assessed. (3 credit hours.)
      • Interdisciplinary examination of salient aspects of black women's history, identity, and experience, including policies, cultural assumptions, and knowledge systems that affect black women's lives. While the primary focus is North America, the lives of black women in other cultural settings within the African Diaspora are also examined. (3 credit hours.)
      • Communicative experiences of black Americans, including black dialect, language and ethnicity, interracial communication, recurring themes, spokespersons in black dialogue, and sociohistorical aspects of black language and communication. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 238 or CMCL-C 238. (3 credit hours.)
      • An interdisciplinary study of how members of four minority groups—Native Americans, Asian Americans, blacks, and Hispanics—combine their struggle for social justice with their desire to maintain their own concepts of identity. (3 credit hours.)
      • The church's role as a black social institution from slavery to the present, its religious attitudes as expressed in songs and sermons, and its political activities as exemplified in the minister-politician. (3 credit hours.)
      • A seminar, primarily designed for sophomores and juniors, directed toward critical analysis of selected topics germane to the future socioeconomic and political position of African Americans. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examination of the historical participation and contributions of African Americans in sport. Students study African American sports pioneers and the social conditions affecting their participation. Period studied includes pre-slavery to the civil rights era (1500 to 1960s). (3 credit hours.)
      • The impact of African American sports heroes, famous teams, and annual sporting events on the shaping of African American culture and the combating of American racism. (3 credit hours.)
      • African American culture in the United States viewed in terms of history (antebellum to present) and social change (rural to urban). Use of oral traditions and life histories to explore aspects of black culture and history. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 292, AAAD-A 392, or FOLK-F 354. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: 3 credit hours of literature. The common and divergent experiences of African-American, Afro-Caribbean, and African travelers to the "City of Light," from eighteenth-century New Orleans Creoles to twenty-first-century youth of African descent, as seen through literature, performance, film, and other arts. Issues of colonization, expatriation, immigration, exile, the Harlem Renaissance and "negritude," race and diaspora, transnationalism. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 304 or CMLT-C 363. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course is an interdisciplinary and comparative study of historical, cultural, and political issues related to Africa and the African Diaspora (the Americas and Europe). Emphasis will also be on team teaching using IUB faculty. Course will be of interest to students in all university departments and schools. (3 credit hours.)
      • Comparative colloquium that explores the recent literature on racial connections between "the local" and "the global" in contemporary American experience. Through immersion in the new "transnational" critiques of the United States, students analyze texts that describe African, Asian, European, indigenous, and Latino sensibilities about culture, homelands, belonging, and exclusion. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines several aspects of the classical, indigenous, and modern political/social bondage. (3 credit hours.)
      • A research seminar, primarily designed for juniors and seniors, directed toward critical analysis of selected topics germane to the future socioeconomic and political position of African Americans. Reading and discussion of relevant texts, studies, and articles. Includes theory construction, research design, and data collection. (3 credit hours.)
      • Legal evolution of civil rights and analysis of specific relevant legal decisions that stimulated social change (the role of slavery, racial segregation, inequality of educational opportunity, and voting laws). (3 credit hours.)
      • Examination of the history, development, and manifestation of feminist consciousness among African American women. The course is particularly concerned with how black women's lived experience defines that consciousness, and the differing impact it has among various groups of black women, and in their larger social, political, and cultural communities. (3 credit hours.)
      • Explores the process, patterns, and paradoxes of the incorporation of individuals and groups identified and/or perceived as "immigrants" from a comparative-interdisciplinary perspective. Focuses on persons from "sending" countries in Africa, the Caribbean, and Asia to the United States. Also examines developments in other labor-importing, postindustrial countries such as France and England in relation to the people who settle there. (3 credit hours.)
      • Consequences of the black diaspora in North America; shifting views of blacks toward their native continent; analysis of current geographic, economic, and political relationships. (3 credit hours.)
      • Advanced study and analysis of selected issues and problems within the African American and African Diaspora experience utilizing interdisciplinary interpretation through analytical reasoning and philosophical discussions. Varied topics primarily in the areas of history, politics, sociology, anthropology, and economics. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Advanced study and analysis of selected issues and problems within the African American and African Diaspora experience utilizing interdisciplinary interpretations through analytical reasoning and philosophical discussions. Varied topics primarily in the areas of dance, music, film, theatre and drama, and literature. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the fight for civil rights by protest organizations such as Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, and Congress of Racial Equality; the emergence of black leaders such as King, Farmer, and Malcolm X; the challenge posed by Black Power advocates in the Black Panthers and Black Muslims; and the changes in American society made by the black revolution. (3 credit hours.)
      • An examination of the historical roles, structures, the impact of black protest strategies, and the origins of black movements to assess their impact on communities in Africa and in the diaspora. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examination of the influence of race, gender, and class from a perspective of power and culture. Use of interdisciplinary sources, including essays, fiction, art, and social science research to examine how different social groups vie for representation, self-definition, and power in different social and cultural settings. (3 credit hours.)
      • Histories, theories, policies, and citizen, state, corporate, nonprofit sector models of transforming past and present societies divided by race, ethnicity, gender, class, caste, tribe, and religion through restorative and distributive justice movements and policies such as civil rights, affirmative action, reparations, and reconciliation tribunals. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the economic, social, cultural and political development of black families residing primarily in rural areas of southern US prior to 1970. Primary attention given to institutional development, race relations, population, and migration. (3 credit hours.)
      • A survey study of national, cultural, and cross-cultural persuasion in theory and practice. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 427 or CMCL-C 427. (3 credit hours.)
      • Focuses on crime reporting in America, addressing the question of whether or not the media distort the picture of crime. In particular, this course explores the mass media treatment of African Americans in the coverage of crime. (3 credit hours.)
      • Education of black Americans and its relationship to the African American experience. Trends and patterns in the education of black Americans as they relate to the notions of education "for whom and for what." (3 credit hours.)
      • Contemporary racial problems in American society with regard to law and constitutional principles of basic freedoms and associated conflicts. Effects of societal norms and impact of racism. (3 credit hours.)
  2. History Courses. 18 credit hours from the list below:
    1. Electives*. At least 15 credit hours of 300–499 level courses (only one of HIST-A 355 African American History I or HIST-A 356 African American History II taken in either History or African American and African Diaspora Studies can be counted toward these 15 hours)
    2. Seminar. One (1) course from the .
      • P: HIST-H 270. Normally limited to majors. Capstone course, generally taken in senior year. Students will discuss and analyze primary and/or secondary sources and undertake a substantial project demonstrating mastery of the historian's skills. Topics will vary. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • For honors students only. Introduction to various approaches in historical scholarship, illustrated with the work of professors in the department. May be taken two times for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Non-U.S. History. Any two courses in non-U.S. history (i.e., Western Europe, Russia and Eastern Europe, Ancient, Middle East, Africa, Latin America, or East Asia)
    4. Residency. At least 12 credit hours of these history courses must be completed in residence at the IU Bloomington campus
  3. Intensive Writing. One (1) course from the .
    • African American writing before World War II, with emphasis on critical reactions and analyses. Includes slave narratives, autobiographies, rhetoric, fiction, and poetry. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: AAAD-A 379. The black experience in America as it has been reflected since World War II in the works of outstanding African American writers: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. (3 credit hours.)
    • The refinement of students' skills as historians; will focus on the skills of writing, interpretation, historical reasoning, discussion, and research. May be repeated with a different topic and the authorization of the history undergraduate advisor for a total of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
  4. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Notes

  • * No course counting toward completion of the upper-level credit hours requirement of the history concentration can also be counted toward completion of the upper-level credit hours requirement of the African American and African Diaspora Studies concentration.

Bachelor of Arts requirements

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines. No more than 62 of these credit hours can come from the major.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 42 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.