Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Arts in Biotechnology (BIOTECBA)Biotechnology Program

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Bachelor of Arts in Biotechnology is tightly integrated with the needs of numerous life science businesses. The B.A. curriculum is designed for students who will receive rigorous training to pursue aspects of biotechnology such as pharmaceutical sales, marketing, technical writing or data specializations. Completing a major in Biotechnology would be advantageous to those who are planning to undertake non-research-oriented business or sales opportunities in the life sciences. Students may combine a major in Biotechnology with degrees in Biology, Chemistry, or Biochemistry.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 32 credit hours (46–48 with the Addenda requirements), including the requirements listed below.

  1. Biology and Biotechnology.
    1. Foundations of Biology. One (1) course from the .
      • Credit by examination for demonstrating an understanding of basic facts and concepts of the lecture content of BIOL-L 112. Credit given for only one of the following: BIOL-E 112, BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 112, or BIOL-Q 201. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: High school or college chemistry. For biology and other science majors. Integrated picture of manner in which organisms at diverse levels of organization meet problems in maintaining and propagating life. Credit given for only one of BIOL-E 112, BIOL-H 111, BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 112, BIOL-Q 201. (4 credit hours.)
    2. Molecular Biology. One (1) course from the .
      • P: BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112; and CHEM-C 105, CHEM-C 117, CHEM-H 117, CHEM-J 117, or CHEM-S 117. Covers structure and function of DNA and RNA; DNA replication, mechanisms of mutation, repair, recombination, and transposition; mechanisms and regulation of gene expression; and the genetic code, transcription, and translation. Introduces bacteriophages, plasmids, and the technology of recombinant DNA. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112; and CHEM-C 117, CHEM-H 117, CHEM-J 117, or CHEM-S 117. R: CHEM-C 341 concurrent. Covers structure and function of DNA and RNA; DNA replication, mechanisms of mutation, repair, recombination, and transposition; mechanisms and regulation of gene expression; and the genetic code, transcription, and translation. Introduces bacteriophages, plasmids, and the technology of recombinant DNA. Course will be taught at an honors level. Credit given for only one of BIOL-S 211, BIOL-L 211, BIOL-L 323, or BIOL-L 324. (5 credit hours.)
    3. Seminar in Biotechnology. One (1) course from the .
      • P: BIOL-L 112. Outside speakers from the biotechnology industry present students with the latest research developments, information about career opportunities, and internship possibilities. Students will write a paper on each seminar, discussing what they have learned and how this knowledge affects their career decisions. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours in BIOL-T 301 and BIOT-T 301. (1 credit hour.)
    4. Biotechnology Lecture. One (1) course from the .
      • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Application of microbial diversity in biotechnology; synthesis of macromolecules; principles of gene expressions; gene cloning; protein engineering, overexpression and purification; genomics; proteomics; bioinformatics. Credit given for only one of BIOL-T 301 and BIOT-T 301. (3 credit hours.)
    5. Societal Issues in Biotechnology. One (1) course from the .
      • P: BIOL-L 112. Consideration of the effects of recent advances in biotechnology on human affairs and the environment. Credit given for only one of BIOL-T 312 or BIOT-T 312. (3 credit hours.)
    6. Biotechnology Laboratory. One (1) course from the .
      • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Students use a problem-based approach to gene cloning; for example, cloning the gene for an industrially important enzyme, alpha-amylase from Credit given for only one of BIOL-T 315 or BIOT-T 315. (3 credit hours.)
      • First in a two-lab sequence for students in the Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Experience (ASURE) program. Students engage in guided research in an area related to the ongoing research of a faculty member. The specific topic of the class will vary by section and be determined by the faculty member associated with the section. (3–4 credit hours.)
    7. Biotechnology Writing and Communication. One (1) course from the .
      • P: Completion of the English composition requirement; BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211; and one of the following: BIOT-X 150, BIOT-T 315, BIOL-L 313, BIOL-L 319, BIOL-L 323, BIOL-L 324, BIOL-M 255, BIOL-M 315, BIOL-M 360, BIOL-M 375, BIOL-M 435, BIOL-M 445, BIOL-X 150, CHEM-A 316, or CHEM-C 343. Covers oral and written scientific communications as appropriate to biotechnology. Topics include figures and tables, technical talks, reading and writing scientific publications, and writing industrial-style documents, including standard operating procedures and study protocols. Credit given for only one of BIOL-T 322 or BIOT-T 322. (3 credit hours.)
    8. Structure, Function, and Regulation of Biomolecules. One (1) course from the .
      • P: CHEM-C 341. Survey of the structure, function, and regulation of biomolecules as related to the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industries. Some focus on problem solving and applications for product development. Credit given for only one of BIOL-T 440 or BIOT-T 440. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Elective. One (1) course from the .
    • P: BIOT-T 315, BIOL-L 319, BIOL-L 323, BIOL-L 324, BIOL-M 315, BIOL-M 435, or BIOL-M 360. In-depth application of advanced laboratory techniques currently used in biotechnology. Course is divided into three modules, each emphasizing a specific discipline within biotechnology. General laboratory techniques are taught in all modules. Credit given for only one of BIOL-T 415 or BIOT-T 415. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 341; and BIOT-T 315, BIOL-L 313, BIOL-L 319, BIOL-L 323, BIOL-L 324, BIOL-M 315, BIOL-M 360, or BIOL-M 435. Develops a working knowledge of a variety of fundamental and advanced protein techniques used in industry, focusing on expression, purification, and characterization. Increases competence in quantitative analysis, data interpretation, problem-solving, scientific writing, and time management. Credit given for only one of BIOL-T 425 or BIOT-T 425. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Biotechnology major; junior or senior standing; at least one credit of BIOT-T 490 or BIOT-X 498; minimum GPA or 3.000; and consent of instructor. Student designs and performs an independent research project under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Requires a final written report on the research. If two semesters of BIOT-X 499 are completed and other departmental honors requirements are met, the written report may be used as an Honors thesis. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Analysis of the mechanisms of inheritance, including developmental processes that lead to the construction of whole organisms and to the transmission to their offspring of specific genetic traits. Includes the principles of genetics and the analysis of mutations affecting development. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-S 311. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Current views of the structure and function of cellular organelles and components, with emphasis on the flow of information through the cell, the metabolism that supports cellular functions, and differences among different specialized cells. Current techniques will be stressed. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 312 or BIOL-L 330. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 113; and one of BIOL-L 211, BIOL-S 211, or CHEM-C 342. R: BIOL-L 312, CHEM-C 484. Theory and techniques of experimental cell physiology. Enzyme purification using spectrophotometry, ion-exchange and gel-permeation chromatography, gel electrophoresis. Respiration and photosynthesis analyzed by cell fractionation, oxygen electrode, and radioactive tracer techniques. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. P or C: BIOL-L 311. Experiments with plants, animals, bacteria, and viruses demonstrating fundamental genetic mechanisms. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 319 or BIOL-S 311. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211; and CHEM-C 101, CHEM-C 117, CHEM-H 117, CHEM-J 117, or CHEM-S 117. R: BIOL-L 312. Introductory course exploring the basic components and function of the immune system, stressing mechanisms that protect humans against pathogens and also how its dysfunction can lead to autoimmune disease, allergy, and cancer. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Manipulation and analysis of genes and genomes. Gene cloning and library screening. Gene amplification and disease diagnosis. Gene mapping and Southern blot analysis of complex genome structure. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 323, BIOL-L 324, or BIOL-S 211. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Theory and molecular biology techniques used to study the human genome and human genes. Students isolate DNA from their cells and apply current techniques for DNA fingerprinting of macro- and microsatellites, telomere length estimation, SNP and Alu polymorphism analysis, gene expression analysis, DNA sequencing, and computer analysis. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 323, BIOL-L 324, or BIOL-S 211. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-S 311. Principles of human genetics are presented. The emphasis is on new developments in the field afforded by present-day techniques in molecular biology. Among the topics considered are sex inheritance, molecular basis of genetic diseases, oncogenesis, and immune system structure. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Computer science and informatics applications to biology have yielded "bioinformatics," a field of study that covers a wide spectrum of data management and processing associated with large-scale, high-throughput biological data generation. This course surveys topics in the generation and analysis of biomolecular sequence data (DNA and protein) that underpin much of modern biology: genetics, ecology, evolution, population and structural biology. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Examines recent scientific publications in gene regulation within a variety of organisms including yeast, Drosophila, mice, and humans. Students learn about new and emerging technologies being used to measure gene expression. Students also learn about human congenital disorders and diseases caused by dysregulation of transcriptional and epigenetic control systems. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 411 or MLS-M 430. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-S 311. Analysis of the developmental processes that lead to the construction of whole organisms from single stem cells. Covers the molecular and genetic analysis of mutations and pathways that disrupt these processes and cause disease. Other topics include adult stem cells and their role in tissue regeneration. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 317 or BIOL-L 417. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: One semester of college chemistry. R: BIOL-L 211. Does not count as an upper-level lecture in the Biology B.A. major or Biology B.S. degree. Application of fundamental principles to the study of microorganisms. Significance of microorganisms to humans and their environment. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. A conventional laboratory of exercises, demonstrations and discussions. The goal is to achieve proficiency in the principles and techniques necessary for the manipulation of microorganisms under aseptic conditions. Credit given for only one of BIOL-M 255 or BIOL-M 315. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-M 250. Explores the transformation of raw materials and energy into living microbes and the mechanisms by which microbes sense and respond to their environment. Compares and contrasts the diverse microbial lifeforms that occupy every possible niche and probe the boundaries of life. Covers microbes of relevance to disease, the environment, and biotechnology. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-M 250; and BIOL-M255, BIOL-M 315, or BIOL-M 316. Introduction to techniques for the fractionation, isolation, and purification of cellular components. Analysis of bacterial growth, enzyme purification, chromatographic analysis of proteins and other metabolites, gel electrophoresis and fermentation studies. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. R: BIOL-L 311 and BIOL-L 312. Viruses of plants, animals (including humans), and bacteria; emphasis on molecular biology of viral systems. Viruses and human disease such as cancer and AIDS; viruses and their evolution. (3 credit hours.)
    • P or C: BIOL-M 430 or consent of instructor. Laboratory will emphasize eukarytotic cell tissue culture and common virological assays used in research and clinical lab settings. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211; and BIOL-M 250, BIOL-M 315, or BIOL-M 316; or consent of instructor. Covers microorganisms as agents of disease, host-parasite relationships, epidemiology, and chemotherapy. Credit given for only one of BIOL-M 200 or BIOL-M 440. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-M 255 or BIOL-M 315. P or C: BIOL-M 440. Laboratory methods of isolation and identification of microorganisms from normal and simulated disease conditions of the human. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211; or consent of instructor. Nutritional, physiological, and cultural properties of the major groups of nonpathogenic bacteria and their relationships as revealed by modern taxonomic methods. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-M 250, BIOL-M 255, or BIOL-M 315; or consent of instructor. Scientific inquiry-driven research in environmental microbiology. Focus on the diversity and function of environmental microbes and methods used to study them. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211; BIOL-M 250; and BIOL-M 255 or BIOL-M 315. Microbes have shaped human history and biological understanding in titanic ways. Course covers ground-breaking experiments that defined essential cellular processes (replication, transcription, translation) in all living organisms, possible origins of life on Earth, microorganism adaptation and pathogen evolution, and advances in medicine, biotechnology, and scientific challenges facing mankind. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-M 250; and BIOL-M 255 or BIOL-M 315. Provides insight into how science is conducted in a modern research lab. Conduct hypothesis driven molecular and genetic experiments using an attenuated medically relevant bacterial pathogen. Techniques / skills: DNA isolation, PCR, recombinant DNA techniques, gel electrophoresis, transposon mutagenesis, transformation, and quantitative bacterial culture. (3 credit hours.)
    • Intended for the junior or senior science major. Course in human physiology designed to introduce the senior undergraduate student to the function of the human body in health, disease, and extreme environments. Emphasizes how the different organ systems work to maintain homeostasis and how organ function is integrated. The content and key concepts are presented in order to provide students insight into the scientific process through problem-solving and exploration of resources. Utilizes experimental inquiry, case-based and problem-oriented methodology with students working in teams, and an emphasis on clinical application. The laboratory component is incorporated into the structure of the course. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. R: CHEM-C 341. Mechanisms of hormone action from the molecular to the organismal level in vertebrates. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. R: BIOL-L 312 and BIOL-Z 466. Survey of various endocrine systems using molecular, cellular, and whole organism methodologies. Emphasis on structure, function, and regulation of endocrine glands and cells, and their roles in maintaining homeostasis within the organism. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 341, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 341; and MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. Theory and application of analytical techniques, including statistical treatment of data, spectroscopy, separation methods, electroanalytical methods, radioisotopes, and immunological methods. Credit given for only one of CHEM-A 314 or CHEM-C 318. (2 credit hours.)
    • P or C: CHEM-C 318 or CHEM-A 314.. Laboratory experiments involve the application of analytical techniques and instrumentation to chemical analysis of biological samples. Methods include spectroscopy, immunoassays, chromatography, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Credit given for only one of CHEM-A 315 or CHEM-A 316. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 484 or consent of instructor. Biosynthesis of macromolecules, control of gene expression, advanced topics in biochemistry. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: A grade of C- or higher in CHEM-C 127; and CHEM-C 341, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 341. R: CHEM-C 342 or CHEM-S 342. Laboratory instruction in the fundamental techniques of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and the use of general synthetic methods. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 343 and CHEM-S 343. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 117, CHEM-J 117, CHEM-S 117, or CHEM-C 243; and MATH-M 212, MATH-S 212, or MATH-M 216; and PHYS-H 222, PHYS-P 202, or PHYS-P 222. R: CHEM-N 330 and MATH-M 311. Quantum states and spectroscopy of molecules, statistical thermodynamics, and elementary kinetic theory, current topics. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 360 or CHEM-C 362. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 342, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 342. Introduction to structure, chemical properties, and interrelationships of biological substances. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 483; or CHEM-C 484 and CHEM-C 485. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 342 or CHEM-S 342. Structure and function of cellular components and the generation of phosphate-bond energy. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 483 or CHEM-C 484. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 342, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 342 with a grade of C- or higher. R: CHEM-C 343 or CHEM-S 343. An integrated lecture-laboratory course covering structure and bonding of inorganic compounds, including transition metal coordination compounds, organometallic compounds, and bioinorganic complexes. Further topics will include nuclear chemistry and reaction mechanisms. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 106 and CHEM-C 126; CHEM-C 118; or CHEM-N 330. (5 credit hours.)
    • ANAT-A 464
  3. Life Sciences Global Events and Trends. One (1) course from the .
    • BUS-X 418
  4. Life Sciences Industry. One (1) course from the .
    • BUS-X 419
  5. Health Care. One (1) course from the .
    • MSCI-M 440
    • SPEA-H 352
    • SPEA-H 432
  6. Addenda Requirements*.
    1. Chemistry.
      1. Principles of Chemistry and Biochemistry I. One (1) course from the .
        • P: CHEM-C 101 and CHEM-C 121; or CHEM-C 103; or chemistry and math placement examinations and consent of the department. Lecture course covering basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry, basic mathematical and conceptual principles in atomic structure and periodic properties, molecular structure, chemical bonding, energy (thermochemistry), kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics. Credit given for only one of the following: CHEM-C 105, CHEM-C 117, CHEM-J 117, or CHEM-S 117. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: Chemistry and math placement examinations and consent of department. For honors students only. For students with unusual aptitude or preparation. An integrated lecture-laboratory course covering basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 105 and CHEM-C 125; CHEM-C 117 and CHEM-C 127; CHEM-J 117 and CHEM-C 127; or CHEM-S 117. (5 credit hours.)
      2. Principles of Chemistry and Biochemistry I Laboratory. One (1) course from the .
        • P or C: CHEM-C 117 or CHEM-J 117. Basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry that align with the topics in CHEM-C 117. Chemical bonding (atomic structure, molecular structure, molecular orbital theory, and non-covalent interactions), macroscopic properties (energy, kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics). Hands-on laboratory techniques in chemistry necessary for success in later chemistry laboratory courses, especially organic chemistry. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 125 or CHEM-C 127. (2 credit hours.)
        • P: Chemistry and math placement examinations and consent of department. For honors students only. For students with unusual aptitude or preparation. An integrated lecture-laboratory course covering basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 105 and CHEM-C 125; CHEM-C 117 and CHEM-C 127; CHEM-J 117 and CHEM-C 127; or CHEM-S 117. (5 credit hours.)
      3. Organic Chemistry I. One (1) course from the .
        • P: CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 117, CHEM-C 243, CHEM-J 117, or CHEM-S 117. Chemistry of carbon compounds. Nomenclature; qualitative theory of valence; structure and reactions. Syntheses and reactions of major classes of monofunctional compounds. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 341, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 341. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: Grade of B+ or higher in CHEM-C 117, CHEM-J 117, or CHEM-S 117; or consent of instructor. For students with unusually good aptitude or preparation. Chemistry of carbon compounds. Nomenclature; qualitative theory of valence; structure and reactions. Syntheses and reactions of major classes of monofunctional compounds. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 341, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 341. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Mathematics. One (1) course from the .
      • R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 014, MATH-M 018, or MATH-J 111. Sets, counting, basic probability, including random variables and expected values. Linear systems, matrices, linear programming, and applications. Credit given for only one of MATH-A 118, MATH-M 118, MATH-S 118, MATH-V 118; or MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 025 or MATH-M 027. Introduction to calculus. Primarily for students from business and the social sciences. Credit given for only one of MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus, and trigonometry as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 027. Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications. A student may receive credit for only one of the following: MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 211 or MATH-S 211; or consent of department. Techniques of integration (by parts, trigonometric substitutions, partial fractions), improper integrals, volume, work, arc length, surface area, infinite series. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 120 or MATH-M 212. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: Placement by examination. Designed for students with one year of calculus in high school. Students completing MATH-M 213 with a final grade of A or B may receive credit for MATH-M 211. Review of material covered in MATH-M 211 followed by an intensive study of all material in MATH-M 212. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 212 or MATH-M 213. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: Hutton Honors College membership. R: To be successful students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 014, MATH-M 018, or MATH-J 111. Designed for students of outstanding ability in mathematics. Covers all material of MATH-M 118 and additional topics from statistics and game theory. Computers may be used in this course, but no previous experience is assumed. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Hutton Honors College membership or consent of department. R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus and trigonometry as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 027. Designed for students of outstanding ability, who are considering further study in mathematics. Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications, with emphasis placed on theory. Credit given for only one of MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-S 211, or MATH-V 119. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-S 211 or consent of department. Includes material of MATH-M 212 and supplemental topics. Designed for students of outstanding ability in mathematics. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212. (4 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Applied Brief Calculus I for the Life Sciences") R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 025 or MATH-M 027. Introduction to calculus. Variable topic course with emphasis on non-business topics and applications. The topic(s) will be listed in the Schedule of Classes each semester. A student may receive credit for only one of the following: MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-S 211, or MATH-V 119. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Statistics. One (1) course from the .
      • P: Admission to the LAMP honors certificate program. A discussion course emphasizing the use of quantitative methods and analytical skills in exploring and solving business-related problems. Topics vary with the instructor and year and include mathematical modeling and operations research, organizational control, and corporate finance. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: One of MATH-M 106, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-M 212, MATH-S 211, MATH-S 212, MATH-V 118, or, MATH-V 119. Introduction to statistics; nature of statistical data; ordering and manipulation of data; measures of central tendency and dispersion; elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370, ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300, MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300, PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, STAT-S 303, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Mastery of high school algebra; or MATH-M 014. Lecture and laboratory. Introduction to methods for analyzing quantitative data. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models of data, inference about populations from random samples. Regression and analysis of variance. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370, ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300, MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300, PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, STAT-S 303, or SPEA-K 300. (4 credit hours.)
      • R: Mastery of high school algebra; or MATH-M 014. Introduction to methods for analyzing data arising in the life sciences, designed for biology, human biology, and pre-medical students. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models, fundamental principles of estimation and hypothesis testing, inferences about means, correlation, linear regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370, ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300, MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300, PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303. (3 credit hours.)
      • SPEA-K 300
  7. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Notes

  • * Courses used to fulfill addenda requirements require a grade of C- or higher and do not count toward the Major GPA or Major Hours.

Bachelor of Arts requirements

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines. No more than 42 of these credit hours can come from the major.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 42 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.