Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Arts in Cognitive Science (COGSBA)Cognitive Science Program

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Bachelor of Arts in Cognitive Science is structured to give students fundamental skills, applicable in a wide variety of information-related careers: psychology, neuroscience, artificial intelligence, media, information processing, medical analysis, data representation and information retrieval, education, scientific research, human-computer interaction, multimedia knowledge management, and information policy. The skills also have wide applicability to technical and expository writing, mathematical analysis, experimental techniques, and computer programming.

Cognitive Science explores the nature of intelligent systems, focusing on formal theories of mind and information and seeks a better understanding of mind, learning and teaching, cognitive skills, and the development of intelligent systems designed to augment human capacities in constructive ways. The field is inherently interdisciplinary, with contributions from computer science, psychology, philosophy, neuroscience, linguistics, biology, anthropology, and other fields. Both natural intelligence (in humans and in animals) and artificial intelligence fall within the scope of inquiry. The field deals with aspects of complex cognition, computational models of thought processing, knowledge representation, dynamics of real-world engagement, and emergent behavior of large-scale interacting systems.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 33 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Core.
    1. Philosophical Foundations. One (1) course from the .
      • Foundational introduction to the cognitive and information sciences. The primary themes are: (1) causal issues such as functional and computational architecture (e.g., modularity, effectiveness, and implementation, analog/digital), neuroscience, and embodied dynamics; and (2) semantic issues such as meaning, representation, content, and information flow. The role of both themes in logic, perception, computation, cognition, and consciousness. Throughout, an emphasis on writing, analysis, and exposition. (4 credit hours.)
    2. Programming for the Cognitive and Information Sciences. One (1) course from the .
      • R: Mastery of two years of high school algebra or the equivalent. Students will learn to write simple computer programs. Programming assignments will focus on the implementation of an important class of models from cognitive science, such as neural networks or production systems. (3 credit hours.)
      • One (1) of the following:
        • (with grade of B or higher) P: High school precalculus math. This course is an introduction, broadly, to algorithmic thinking and, specifically, to programming. It teaches the basics of programming using real world applications in natural, physical and social sciences. Students will develop ability to program by identifying problems in real world and then creating a program that solves the problem. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, CSCI-H 211, or CSCI-A 591. (4 credit hours.)
        • (with grade of B or higher) P: High school precalculus math. A first course in computer science for those intending to take advanced computer science courses. Introduction to programming and to algorithm design and analysis. Using the Scheme programming language, the course covers several programming paradigms. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, CSCI-H 211, or CSCI-A 591. (4 credit hours.)
    3. Computation in the Cognitive and Information Sciences. One (1) course from the .
      • P: COGS-Q 260, CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, or CSCI-H 211 with a grade of B or higher. Develop computer programming skills, learn to write programs that simulate cognitive processes, and run experiments with human subjects. The relation between computation and intelligence and a selection of approaches from artificial intelligence will be explored. (3 credit hours.)
    4. Mathematics and Logic for the Cognitive and Information Sciences. One (1) course from the .
      • R: Mastery of two years of high school algebra or the equivalent. An introduction to the suite of mathematical and logical tools used in the cognitive and information sciences, including finite mathematics, automata and computability theory, elementary probability, and statistics, together with short introductions to formal semantics and dynamical systems. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 350 or COGS-Q 250. (4 credit hours.)
    5. Experiments and Models in Cognition. One (1) course from the .
      • P: COGS-Q 260, CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, of CSCI-H 211 with a grade of B or higher. R: Mastery of two years of high school algebra or the equivalent; PSY-K 300 or equivalent familiarity with statistics. This course develops tools for studying mind and intelligence, including experimental techniques, and mathematical and computational models of human behavior. Topics include neural structures for cognition, attention, perception, memory, problem solving, judgment, decision making, and consciousness. Students will design and analyze laboratory experiments and apply formal models to the results. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 270 or COGS-Q 370. (4 credit hours.)
  2. Focal Area. Three (3) courses in one of the following areas (at least one must be at or above the 200 level, and at least two at or above the 300 level):
    • Cognition. Three (3) courses from the .
      • R: PSY-P 101. An introduction to the neural mechanisms underlying complex cognition, and a survey of topics in neuroscience related to cognition. The course provides a solid background in human biopsychology. If COGS-Q 301 is not offered in a given year, PSY-P 423 Human Neuropsychology may be substituted for this course. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: COGS-Q 260, CSCI-C 211, or CSCI-H 211 with a grade of B or higher; and one of COGS-Q 350, COGS-Q 351, or CSCI-B 351; or consent of instructor. An overview of common neural networks, especially deep learning. Practical computer programming exercises, mainly in Python, provide training in how to implement neural networks to solve real-world problems. Students will be able to implement practical neural network solutions and evaluate their suitability as models of the brain and cognition. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Animal Thinking") Applies concepts used by the natural and physical sciences to illuminate general laws of science and to describe natural phenomena using primarily quantitative methods and empirical inquiry. Uses the scientific method for asking and answering questions about scientific phenomena and scientific uncertainty. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; or PSY-P 155. Facts and principles of animal and human learning, especially as treated in theories attempting to provide frameworks for understanding what learning is and how it takes place. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. R: MATH-M 026, MATH-M 119, or introductory physics. Basic data, theories, psychophysics, illusions, and other topics fundamental to understanding sensory and perceptual processes. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Roboticists know that actions like catching a fly ball are exceedingly complex, yet people perform them effortlessly. How perceptual information is generated by and used in guiding such actions is covered, as are issues of motor coordination and control. Classes include laboratories on analysis of optic flow and limb movements. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 330 or PSY-P 330. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Introduction to human cognitive processes, including attention and perception, memory, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Theories and data of experimental psychology applied to the problems of the interaction of people and technology. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 211; and PSY-P 329; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. The experimental investigation of current and classical problems in sensory psychology and perception. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 211; and PSY-P 325 or PSY-P 335; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Experimental study of human learning and cognitive processes. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 335. Methods, research, and theory in psycholinguistics. Examination of speech perception, speech production, psychological studies of syntax and semantics, language development, cognitive basis of linguistic theory, neurology of language, and language comprehension and thought. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 335. A critical examination of an area within cognitive psychology. Topics will vary by semester but could include attention, memory, categorization, imagery, language, thinking, problem solving, or decision making. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326, PSY-P 335, or PSY-P 346. Introduction to the neuroscience of language comprehension, including the basic neuroanatomy of the language system and levels of processing from single word to discourse level. Discussion of such language disorders as dyslexia and aphasia. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 315 or PSY-P 316. Human cognitive development. Topics may include language, problem solving, conceptual growth, perception, and cultural influences. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: One of SPHS-S 108, SPHS-S 110, or SPHS-S 215; and one of ANAT-A 215 or SPHS-S 201 . Review of cognitive and communicative changes associated with normal aging as well as with diseases and conditions that are prevalent in the aging population. Includes discussion of methodological issues in research on aging as well as principles for maximizing communication with the elderly population. (3 credit hours.)
    • Computation. Three (3) courses from the .
      • P: CSCI-C 211, CSCI-H 211, or consent of instructor. A survey of techniques for machine intelligence and their relation to human intelligence. Topics include modeling techniques, neural networks and parallel processing systems, problem-solving methods, knowledge representation, expert systems, vision, heuristics, production systems, speech perception, and natural language understanding. Students who have completed both COGS-C 463 and COGS-C 464 are exempted from taking this course. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 351 or CSCI-B 351. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: COGS-Q 260, CSCI-C 211, or CSCI-H 211 with a grade of B or higher; and one of COGS-Q 350, COGS-Q 351, or CSCI-B 351; or consent of instructor. An overview of common neural networks, especially deep learning. Practical computer programming exercises, mainly in Python, provide training in how to implement neural networks to solve real-world problems. Students will be able to implement practical neural network solutions and evaluate their suitability as models of the brain and cognition. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Two semesters of computer programming. Introduction to the design, construction, and control of autonomous mobile robots. Includes basic mechanics, electronics, and programming for robotics, as well as the applications of robots in cognitive science. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 360 or CSCI-B 355. (3 credit hours.)
      • No description is available for this course.
      • CSCI-B 351
      • One (1) of the following:
        • P: High school precalculus math. This course is an introduction, broadly, to algorithmic thinking and, specifically, to programming. It teaches the basics of programming using real world applications in natural, physical and social sciences. Students will develop ability to program by identifying problems in real world and then creating a program that solves the problem. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, CSCI-H 211, or CSCI-A 591. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: High school precalculus math. A first course in computer science for those intending to take advanced computer science courses. Introduction to programming and to algorithm design and analysis. Using the Scheme programming language, the course covers several programming paradigms. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, CSCI-H 211, or CSCI-A 591. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211.. Design of computer software systems and introduction to programming in the environment of a contemporary operating system. Topics include a modern object-oriented programming language; building and maintaining large projects; and understanding the operating system interface. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 592, CSCI-C 212, CSCI-H 212, or ENGR-E 111. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211. R: MATH-M 211 . Induction and recursive programs, running time, asymptotic notations, combinatorics and discrete probability, trees and lists, the relational data model, graph algorithms, propositional and predicate logic. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 241 or CSCI-H 241. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: CSCI-C 212 and CSCI-C 241. Systematic approach to programming languages. Relationships among languages, properties and features of languages, and the computer environment necessary to use languages. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 596, CSCI-B 521, CSCI-C 311, or CSCI-H 311. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: CSCI-C 212, CSCI-C 241, and CSCI-C 291. Structure and internal operation of computers. The architecture and assembly language programming of a specific computer are stressed, in addition to general principles of hardware organization and low-level software systems. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 335 or CSCI-H 335. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: CSCI-C 212 and CSCI-C 241. Systematic study of data structures encountered in computing problems, structure and use of storage media, methods of representing structured data, and techniques for operating on data structures. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 343 or CSCI-H 343. (4 credit hours.)
    • Foundations. Three (3) courses from the .
      • (approved topic: "Animal Thinking") Applies concepts used by the natural and physical sciences to illuminate general laws of science and to describe natural phenomena using primarily quantitative methods and empirical inquiry. Uses the scientific method for asking and answering questions about scientific phenomena and scientific uncertainty. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: 3 credit hours in philosophy. Topics such as existence, individuation, contingency, universals and particulars, causality, determinism, space, time, events and change, relation of mental and physical. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: 3 credit hours in philosophy. Topics such as various theories of perceptual realism, sense-datum theories, theories of appearing, phenomenalism, the nature of knowledge, the relation between knowledge and belief, relation between knowledge and evidence, and the problem of skepticism. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: PHIL-P 250 (or another logic course involving formal languages and methods, such as COGS-Q 350 or MATH-M 384) and at least one other course in Philosophy. Students who have not successfully completed a course in logic may find this course difficult. A study of selected philosophical problems concerning language and their bearing on traditional problems in philosophy. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: 3 credit hours of philosophy or coursework in cognitive science or brain and psychological science. Selected topics from among the following: the nature of mental phenomena (e.g., thinking, volition, perception, emotion); the mind-body problem (e.g., dualism, behaviorism, functionalism); connections to cognitive science issues in psychology, linguistics, and artificial intelligence; computational theories of mind. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: 3 credit hours of philosophy. The nature of human and rational action: the structure of intentions and practical consciousness; the role of the self in action; volitions; the connections of desires, needs, and purposes to intentions and doings; causation and motivation; freedom; the structure of deliberation; rational actions and duties, whether moral or institutional. (3 credit hours.)
    • Informatics. Three (3) courses from the .
      • One (1) of the following:
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
      • One (1) of the following:
        • No description is available for this course.
        • P: CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211.. Design of computer software systems and introduction to programming in the environment of a contemporary operating system. Topics include a modern object-oriented programming language; building and maintaining large projects; and understanding the operating system interface. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 592, CSCI-C 212, CSCI-H 212, or ENGR-E 111. (4 credit hours.)
        • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
    • Language. Three (3) courses from the .
      • Introduction to basic concepts of linguistic analysis, exemplifying the general principles of structural approaches to the modeling of language. Focus on, and application of, analytical methods applied in phonetics/phonology and morphology/syntax. Credit given for only one of LING-L 203 or LING-L 303. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to the nature of speech, and the physiology and process of speech production, and training in IPA transcription of utterances drawn from the languages of the world, including various English dialects. The course includes an emphasis on naturally occurring speech and understanding physical aspects of speech behavior. Some laboratory work is included. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: LING-L 306. Basic concepts such as the phoneme and distinctive feature as defined and used within particular theories. The relationship of phonology to phonetics and morphology; exploration of salient aspects of sound structure and some characteristic modes of argumentation; extensive phonological analysis with some practice in writing phonological rules. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: LING-L 103, LING-L 203, or LING-L 307. An introduction to morphology, the study of the internal structure of words. Topics include the concept of the morpheme, the structure of words and processes of word formation, inflection versus derivation, and issues in morphological theory. Students will do morphological analyses on forms drawn from a variety of languages. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: LING-L 203. Examination of the basic concepts, assumptions, and argumentation of modern syntactic theory to describe and analyze common syntactic structures in English and other languages. Practice in constructing and evaluating grammars. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: LING-L 203. An introduction to the relationship between linguistic forms and their meanings, use, and interpretation. Students will investigate the domain of linguistic semantics and acquire the "tools" to do semantic analysis and to critically evaluate those of others. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: LING-L 307. R: LING-L 310 or LING-L 308. An introduction to how languages change over time and how prehistoric languages can be reconstructed by comparing their modern descendants. Major topics include principles of language change; historical reconstruction; language relatedness and language families; variation and the mechanism of language change; contact-induced change; the birth and death of languages. (3 credit hours.)
      • The linguistic analysis of particular aspects of the structure of one language or a group of closely related languages. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: PHIL-P 250 (or another logic course involving formal languages and methods, such as COGS-Q 350 or MATH-M 384) and at least one other course in Philosophy. Students who have not successfully completed a course in logic may find this course difficult. A study of selected philosophical problems concerning language and their bearing on traditional problems in philosophy. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 335. Methods, research, and theory in psycholinguistics. Examination of speech perception, speech production, psychological studies of syntax and semantics, language development, cognitive basis of linguistic theory, neurology of language, and language comprehension and thought. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326, PSY-P 335, or PSY-P 346. Introduction to the neuroscience of language comprehension, including the basic neuroanatomy of the language system and levels of processing from single word to discourse level. Discussion of such language disorders as dyslexia and aphasia. (3 credit hours.)
      • Anatomy and physiology of the speech mechanism; contemporary views of speech physiology; subsystems of the speech mechanism - respiratory, laryngeal, and supraglottal - integrated with a model of speech production. Laboratory experiences. (3 credit hours.)
      • SPHS-S 302
      • P: One of SPHS-S 108, SPHS-S 110, or SPHS-S 215; and one of ANAT-A 215 or SPHS-S 201 . Review of cognitive and communicative changes associated with normal aging as well as with diseases and conditions that are prevalent in the aging population. Includes discussion of methodological issues in research on aging as well as principles for maximizing communication with the elderly population. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: LING-L 103 or LING-L 303. Develops student knowledge of how language is acquired by young children. Examines data on what young infants and young children know about language at different ages, and considers the kinds of theories that may explain this data. (3 credit hours.)
    • Logic. Three (3) courses from the .
      • P: CSCI-C 241, MATH-M 303, or MATH-S 303. Construction and study of formal mathematical languages. Definitions of, and relationships between, the notions of truth and provability of a formal sentence. Proof systems for logical systems such as propositional logic and syllogistic logic. Soundness, completeness, and decidability. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 118, MATH-S 118, or equivalent. Discrete mathematics. Topics in math motivated by linguistics, chosen from formal approaches to syntax and semantics, and from statistical and computational linguistics. (3 credit hours.)
      • Propositional logic and first-order quantificational logic. No credit for PHIL-P 150 if PHIL-P 250 taken first or concurrently. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHIL-P 250 or consent of instructor. Identity, definite descriptions, properties of formal theories, elementary set theory. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHIL-P 250 or consent of instructor. Elementary operations on sets, relations, functions, orderings, introduction to ordinal and cardinal numbers. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHIL-P 250 or consent of instructor. Relation of logic to other areas of philosophy. Selected topics from among the following: logic and ontology; logic and language; logic, reasoning, and belief; intentionality and intentional logic; tense and modal logic; individuation, reference, identity. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: CSCI-C 212 and CSCI-C 241. Fundamentals of formal language theory, computation models and computability, the limits of computability and feasibility, and program verification. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: CSCI-C 311. Tools and techniques for rigorous reasoning about software and digital hardware. Safety, reliability, security, and other design-critical applications. Decision algorithms. Projects involving the use of automated reasoning, such as model checkers, theorem provers, and program transformation. Credit given for only one of CSCI-P 415 or CSCI-P 515. (3 credit hours.)
    • Neuroscience. Three (3) courses from the .
      • R: PSY-P 101. An introduction to the neural mechanisms underlying complex cognition, and a survey of topics in neuroscience related to cognition. The course provides a solid background in human biopsychology. If COGS-Q 301 is not offered in a given year, PSY-P 423 Human Neuropsychology may be substituted for this course. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-H 222, PHYS-P 202, or PHYS-P 222; and MATH-M 120 or MATH-M 211. . Introduction to quantitative methods for life sciences, emphasizing how living systems process information. Topics include noise in sensory signals; consequences for sensory processing; uncertainty and decision making; neural networks, excitable waves in neurons and muscle; stability/instability; models of development and morphogenesis. Open to students in the physical or life sciences. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155; and one of BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 111, BIOL-L 112, or equivalent. An examination of the cellular bases of behavior, emphasizing contemporary views and approaches to the study of the nervous system. Neural structure, function, and organization are considered in relation to sensory and motor function, motivation, learning, and other basic behaviors. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Psychological disorders such as depression and autism exact a huge toll in human suffering and social costs. This course surveys the role of disturbed neural mechanisms on the development of psychological disorders. Methods for investigating the relationship between a disorder and proposed mechanisms will be critically evaluated. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. R: 3 credits of Biology such as BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 111, BIOL-L 112, BIOL-A 215, or BIOL-P 215. A survey of contemporary neuroscience, examining the neural basis of behavior with approaches including molecular, cellular, developmental, cognitive, and behavioral neuroscience. Sensory and motor function, learning and memory, and other behaviors are considered using anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, and genetic approaches, providing a balanced view of neuroscience. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Introduction to the major psychoactive drugs and how they act upon the brain to influence behavior. Discussion of the role of drugs as therapeutic agents for various clinical disorders and as probes to provide insight into brain function. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Examination of the interaction of the developing brain with the behavior it mediates. Cellular systems and organismal levels of analysis will all be considered in the organization of structure function relationships in the neural basis of behavior. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Comprehensive survey of theories and data concerned with neural correlates of associative and non-associative forms of learning and memory. Vertebrate and invertebrate model systems and preparations as well as data obtained from the human neuropsychology literature will be studied. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. A critical examination of neurological functioning with respect to human and other animal behavior. Assesses the behavioral functions of neural structures and systems through understanding the behavioral consequences of brain damage and through basic experimental study. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Experiments with and demonstrations of contemporary approaches in behavioral neuroscience. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326, PSY-P 335, or PSY-P 346. Introduction to the neuroscience of language comprehension, including the basic neuroanatomy of the language system and levels of processing from single word to discourse level. Discussion of such language disorders as dyslexia and aphasia. (3 credit hours.)
    • In addition to these preapproved focal areas, other specialized focal areas may be designed by individual students and submitted for approval to the cognitive science undergraduate curriculum committee.
  3. Breadth. Three (3) additional courses from at least two different departments, outside of the focal area, from the
    • Introduces the interdisciplinary science of human evolution using evidence from genetics, comparative anatomy and behavior of living primates, fossils, and archaeology. Shows how understanding the evolutionary past is relevant to current and future human conditions. Does not count toward the major. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 105, ANTH-A 107, ANTH-A 303, or ANTH-A 310. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Animal Thinking") Applies concepts used by the natural and physical sciences to illuminate general laws of science and to describe natural phenomena using primarily quantitative methods and empirical inquiry. Uses the scientific method for asking and answering questions about scientific phenomena and scientific uncertainty. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • A survey of perspectives on language, covering topics such as the relation between the form of words and sentences and their meanings, the sounds of languages and their dialect variations, the use of language in daily life, language in humans and animals, and the relationship between language and thought. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to basic concepts of linguistic analysis, exemplifying the general principles of structural approaches to the modeling of language. Focus on, and application of, analytical methods applied in phonetics/phonology and morphology/syntax. Credit given for only one of LING-L 203 or LING-L 303. (3 credit hours.)
    • The study of topics relating to the role of language as a social phenomenon. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to the nature of speech, and the physiology and process of speech production, and training in IPA transcription of utterances drawn from the languages of the world, including various English dialects. The course includes an emphasis on naturally occurring speech and understanding physical aspects of speech behavior. Some laboratory work is included. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: LING-L 306. Basic concepts such as the phoneme and distinctive feature as defined and used within particular theories. The relationship of phonology to phonetics and morphology; exploration of salient aspects of sound structure and some characteristic modes of argumentation; extensive phonological analysis with some practice in writing phonological rules. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: LING-L 103, LING-L 203, or LING-L 307. An introduction to morphology, the study of the internal structure of words. Topics include the concept of the morpheme, the structure of words and processes of word formation, inflection versus derivation, and issues in morphological theory. Students will do morphological analyses on forms drawn from a variety of languages. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: LING-L 203. Examination of the basic concepts, assumptions, and argumentation of modern syntactic theory to describe and analyze common syntactic structures in English and other languages. Practice in constructing and evaluating grammars. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: LING-L 203. An introduction to the relationship between linguistic forms and their meanings, use, and interpretation. Students will investigate the domain of linguistic semantics and acquire the "tools" to do semantic analysis and to critically evaluate those of others. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: LING-L 307. R: LING-L 310 or LING-L 308. An introduction to how languages change over time and how prehistoric languages can be reconstructed by comparing their modern descendants. Major topics include principles of language change; historical reconstruction; language relatedness and language families; variation and the mechanism of language change; contact-induced change; the birth and death of languages. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: LING-L 307. R: LING-L 310. Introduction to the procedures involved in the structural description of language, using a native speaker of an unfamiliar language whose speech will be analyzed. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: LING-L 431. Advanced analysis of the language under study in LING-L 431. (3 credit hours.)
    • The linguistic analysis of particular aspects of the structure of one language or a group of closely related languages. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 241, MATH-M 303, or MATH-S 303. Construction and study of formal mathematical languages. Definitions of, and relationships between, the notions of truth and provability of a formal sentence. Proof systems for logical systems such as propositional logic and syllogistic logic. Soundness, completeness, and decidability. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: MATH-M 118, MATH-S 118, or equivalent. Discrete mathematics. Topics in math motivated by linguistics, chosen from formal approaches to syntax and semantics, and from statistical and computational linguistics. (3 credit hours.)
    • Perennial problems of philosophy, including problems in ethics, in epistemology and metaphysics, in philosophy of religion. Major emphases appear in the Schedule of Classes. (3 credit hours.)
    • We spend a good part of our waking hours thinking and/or critiquing the thoughts and beliefs of ourselves and others. This course is designed to help you develop a toolbox of techniques and skills that will help you become a skilled evaluator and creator of arguments. (3 credit hours.)
    • Propositional logic and first-order quantificational logic. No credit for PHIL-P 150 if PHIL-P 250 taken first or concurrently. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PHIL-P 250 or consent of instructor. Identity, definite descriptions, properties of formal theories, elementary set theory. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: 3 credit hours in philosophy. Topics such as existence, individuation, contingency, universals and particulars, causality, determinism, space, time, events and change, relation of mental and physical. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: 3 credit hours in philosophy. Topics such as various theories of perceptual realism, sense-datum theories, theories of appearing, phenomenalism, the nature of knowledge, the relation between knowledge and belief, relation between knowledge and evidence, and the problem of skepticism. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: PHIL-P 250 (or another logic course involving formal languages and methods, such as COGS-Q 350 or MATH-M 384) and at least one other course in Philosophy. Students who have not successfully completed a course in logic may find this course difficult. A study of selected philosophical problems concerning language and their bearing on traditional problems in philosophy. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PHIL-P 250 or consent of instructor. Elementary operations on sets, relations, functions, orderings, introduction to ordinal and cardinal numbers. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PHIL-P 250 or consent of instructor. Relation of logic to other areas of philosophy. Selected topics from among the following: logic and ontology; logic and language; logic, reasoning, and belief; intentionality and intentional logic; tense and modal logic; individuation, reference, identity. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: 3 credit hours of philosophy or coursework in cognitive science or brain and psychological science. Selected topics from among the following: the nature of mental phenomena (e.g., thinking, volition, perception, emotion); the mind-body problem (e.g., dualism, behaviorism, functionalism); connections to cognitive science issues in psychology, linguistics, and artificial intelligence; computational theories of mind. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: 3 credit hours of philosophy. The nature of human and rational action: the structure of intentions and practical consciousness; the role of the self in action; volitions; the connections of desires, needs, and purposes to intentions and doings; causation and motivation; freedom; the structure of deliberation; rational actions and duties, whether moral or institutional. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PHYS-H 222, PHYS-P 202, or PHYS-P 222; and MATH-M 120 or MATH-M 211. . Introduction to quantitative methods for life sciences, emphasizing how living systems process information. Topics include noise in sensory signals; consequences for sensory processing; uncertainty and decision making; neural networks, excitable waves in neurons and muscle; stability/instability; models of development and morphogenesis. Open to students in the physical or life sciences. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to psychology; its methods, data, and theoretical interpretations in areas of learning, sensory psychology, and psychophysiology. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 101, PSY-P 106, PSY-P 151, or PSY-P 155. Equivalent to IUPUI PSY-B 105 and PSY-P 151. (3 credit hours.)
    • An introduction to psychological and brain sciences for psychology majors. Introduces students to the history of psychology and its place in science, to the experimental method, and to the broad range of topics studied by psychological scientists. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 101, PSY-P 106, PSY-P 151, or PSY-P 155. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Design and execution of simple experiments, treatment of results, search of the literature, and preparation of experimental reports. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; or PSY-P 155. Facts and principles of animal and human learning, especially as treated in theories attempting to provide frameworks for understanding what learning is and how it takes place. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155; and one of BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 111, BIOL-L 112, or equivalent. An examination of the cellular bases of behavior, emphasizing contemporary views and approaches to the study of the nervous system. Neural structure, function, and organization are considered in relation to sensory and motor function, motivation, learning, and other basic behaviors. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. R: MATH-M 026, MATH-M 119, or introductory physics. Basic data, theories, psychophysics, illusions, and other topics fundamental to understanding sensory and perceptual processes. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Roboticists know that actions like catching a fly ball are exceedingly complex, yet people perform them effortlessly. How perceptual information is generated by and used in guiding such actions is covered, as are issues of motor coordination and control. Classes include laboratories on analysis of optic flow and limb movements. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 330 or PSY-P 330. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Introduction to human cognitive processes, including attention and perception, memory, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Psychological disorders such as depression and autism exact a huge toll in human suffering and social costs. This course surveys the role of disturbed neural mechanisms on the development of psychological disorders. Methods for investigating the relationship between a disorder and proposed mechanisms will be critically evaluated. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. R: 3 credits of Biology such as BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 111, BIOL-L 112, BIOL-A 215, or BIOL-P 215. A survey of contemporary neuroscience, examining the neural basis of behavior with approaches including molecular, cellular, developmental, cognitive, and behavioral neuroscience. Sensory and motor function, learning and memory, and other behaviors are considered using anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, and genetic approaches, providing a balanced view of neuroscience. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. An overview of the field of cognitive neuroscience. The neural basis of cognition is studied by considering the impact of neuropsychological case studies, neuroimaging (ERP and fMRI), and behavioral investigations on our understanding of sensory-motor systems, learning, memory, emotion, and spatial behavior. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Theories and data of experimental psychology applied to the problems of the interaction of people and technology. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155; and MATH-M 118; and MATH-M 119. R: MATH-M 360. Survey of mathematically oriented psychological theories and their applications to learning, perception, psychophysics, decision making, small groups, etc. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Introduction to the major psychoactive drugs and how they act upon the brain to influence behavior. Discussion of the role of drugs as therapeutic agents for various clinical disorders and as probes to provide insight into brain function. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Examination of the interaction of the developing brain with the behavior it mediates. Cellular systems and organismal levels of analysis will all be considered in the organization of structure function relationships in the neural basis of behavior. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Comprehensive survey of theories and data concerned with neural correlates of associative and non-associative forms of learning and memory. Vertebrate and invertebrate model systems and preparations as well as data obtained from the human neuropsychology literature will be studied. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Methods, findings, and interpretations of recent investigations of animal behavior. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. A critical examination of neurological functioning with respect to human and other animal behavior. Assesses the behavioral functions of neural structures and systems through understanding the behavioral consequences of brain damage and through basic experimental study. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 211; and PSY-P 329; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. The experimental investigation of current and classical problems in sensory psychology and perception. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Experiments with and demonstrations of contemporary approaches in behavioral neuroscience. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 211; and PSY-P 315 or PSY-P 316; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Research methods in developmental psychology and their application to selected problems in the development of humans and of nonhuman species. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Laboratory experience in all facets of a neuroimaging experiment, including experimental design, data acquisition, data analysis, data interpretation, and data presentation. Introductory magnetic resonance (MR) physics and the physiology of blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) changes are included. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 211; and PSY-P 325 or PSY-P 335; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Experimental study of human learning and cognitive processes. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 335. Methods, research, and theory in psycholinguistics. Examination of speech perception, speech production, psychological studies of syntax and semantics, language development, cognitive basis of linguistic theory, neurology of language, and language comprehension and thought. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 335. A critical examination of an area within cognitive psychology. Topics will vary by semester but could include attention, memory, categorization, imagery, language, thinking, problem solving, or decision making. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326, PSY-P 335, or PSY-P 346. Introduction to the neuroscience of language comprehension, including the basic neuroanatomy of the language system and levels of processing from single word to discourse level. Discussion of such language disorders as dyslexia and aphasia. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 315 or PSY-P 316. Human cognitive development. Topics may include language, problem solving, conceptual growth, perception, and cultural influences. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 315 or PSY-P 316 . R: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Survey of phylogenetic and ontogenetic principles from a comparative perspective. Focuses on a broad biological approach to organic and social development. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 304 or PSY-P 320. Judgments, decisions, and perceptions of a social nature include self-knowledge, judgments of causality, biases and errors of social judgment such as stereotyping, and the relation of thinking and feeling. Principles will be considered in the context of applied areas such as law and psychotherapy. (3 credit hours.)
    • Anatomy and physiology of the speech mechanism; contemporary views of speech physiology; subsystems of the speech mechanism - respiratory, laryngeal, and supraglottal - integrated with a model of speech production. Laboratory experiences. (3 credit hours.)
    • SPHS-S 302
    • P: One of SPHS-S 108, SPHS-S 110, or SPHS-S 215; and one of ANAT-A 215 or SPHS-S 201 . Review of cognitive and communicative changes associated with normal aging as well as with diseases and conditions that are prevalent in the aging population. Includes discussion of methodological issues in research on aging as well as principles for maximizing communication with the elderly population. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • CSCI-B 351
    • P: Two semesters of computer programming or consent of instructor. Introduction to the design, construction, and control of autonomous mobile robots. This course covers basic mechanics, electronics and programming for robotics, as well as the applications of robots in cognitive science. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 360 or CSCI-B 355. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 212 and CSCI-C 241. Fundamentals of formal language theory, computation models and computability, the limits of computability and feasibility, and program verification. (3 credit hours.)
    • One (1) of the following:
      • P: High school precalculus math. This course is an introduction, broadly, to algorithmic thinking and, specifically, to programming. It teaches the basics of programming using real world applications in natural, physical and social sciences. Students will develop ability to program by identifying problems in real world and then creating a program that solves the problem. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, CSCI-H 211, or CSCI-A 591. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: High school precalculus math. A first course in computer science for those intending to take advanced computer science courses. Introduction to programming and to algorithm design and analysis. Using the Scheme programming language, the course covers several programming paradigms. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, CSCI-H 211, or CSCI-A 591. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211. R: MATH-M 211 . Induction and recursive programs, running time, asymptotic notations, combinatorics and discrete probability, trees and lists, the relational data model, graph algorithms, propositional and predicate logic. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 241 or CSCI-H 241. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211.. Design of computer software systems and introduction to programming in the environment of a contemporary operating system. Topics include a modern object-oriented programming language; building and maintaining large projects; and understanding the operating system interface. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 592, CSCI-C 212, CSCI-H 212, or ENGR-E 111. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 212 and CSCI-C 241. Systematic approach to programming languages. Relationships among languages, properties and features of languages, and the computer environment necessary to use languages. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 596, CSCI-B 521, CSCI-C 311, or CSCI-H 311. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 212, CSCI-C 241, and CSCI-C 291. Structure and internal operation of computers. The architecture and assembly language programming of a specific computer are stressed, in addition to general principles of hardware organization and low-level software systems. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 335 or CSCI-H 335. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 212 and CSCI-C 241. Systematic study of data structures encountered in computing problems, structure and use of storage media, methods of representing structured data, and techniques for operating on data structures. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 343 or CSCI-H 343. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: High school precalculus math. Honors version of CSCI-C 211. A first course in computer science for those intending to take advanced computer science courses. Introduction to programming and to algorithm design and analysis. Using the Scheme programming language, the course covers several programming paradigms. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 591, CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, or CSCI-H 211. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211. Honors version of CSCI-C 212. Design of computer software systems and introduction to programming in the environment of a contemporary operating system. Topics include a modern object-oriented programming language; building and maintaining large projects; and understanding the operating system interface. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 592, CSCI-C 212, CSCI-H 212, or ENGR-E 111. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211 . R: MATH-M 211. Honors version of CSCI-C 241. Induction and recursive programs, running time, asymptotic notations, combinatorics and discrete probability, trees and lists, the relational data model, graph algorithms, propositional and predicate logic. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 241 or CSCI-H 241. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 212 and CSCI-C 241. Honors version of CSCI-C 311. Systematic approach to programming languages. Relationships among languages, properties and features of languages, and the computer environment necessary to use languages. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 596, CSCI-B 521, CSCI-C 311, or CSCI-H 311. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 212, CSCI-C 241, and CSCI-C 291. Honors version of CSCI-C 335. Structure and internal operation of computers. The architecture and assembly language programming of a specific computer are stressed, in addition to general principles of hardware organization and low-level software systems. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 335 or CSCI-H 335. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 212, CSCI-C 241 and CSCI-C 291. Honors version of CSCI-C 343. Systematic study of data structures encountered in computing problems, structure and use of storage media, methods of representing structured data, and techniques for operating on data structures. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 343 or CSCI-H 343. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CSCI-C 311. Tools and techniques for rigorous reasoning about software and digital hardware. Safety, reliability, security, and other design-critical applications. Decision algorithms. Projects involving the use of automated reasoning, such as model checkers, theorem provers, and program transformation. Credit given for only one of CSCI-P 415 or CSCI-P 515. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
  4. Senior Seminar. One (1) course from the .
    • P: Four courses from COGS-Q 240, COGS-Q 260, COGS-Q 320; COGS-Q 350 or COGS-Q 250; COGS-Q 370 or COGS-Q 270. This course is intended for students who have completed or nearly completed their cognitive science coursework. Students will apply previously acquired analytic, computational, mathematical, and experimental skills to independent research projects. Discussion and research topics may include consciousness, representation, artificial life, modularity, neural networks, functionalism and embodiment, dynamical systems, learning and innateness, human-computer interaction, cognitive neuroscience, robotics, and adaptive systems. (2 credit hours.)
  5. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Arts requirements

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines. No more than 42 of these credit hours can come from the major.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 42 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.