Majors, minors + certificates

Interdepartmental Minor in Economics and Political Science (ECONPOLMIN)Department of Economics

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The interdepartmental minor in political science and economics introduces students to important issues in both the public and private sectors.

Minor requirements

The minor requires at least 18 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Economics courses. Nine (9) credit hours chosen from the following:
    • Introduction to Microeconomics. One (1) course from the .
      • Scarcity, opportunity cost, competitive and non-competitive market pricing, and interdependence as an analytical core. Individual sections apply this core to a variety of current economic policy problems, such as poverty, pollution, excise taxes, rent controls, and farm subsidies. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Honors student. Designed for students of superior ability. Covers same core materials as ECON-E 201 and substitutes for ECON-E 201 as a prerequisite for other courses. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to Macroeconomics. One (1) course from the .
      • P: ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201. Measuring and explaining aggregate economic performance, money, monetary policy, and fiscal policy as an analytical core. Individual sections apply this core to a variety of current economic policy problems, such as inflation, unemployment, and economic growth. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: ECON-S 201 or ECON-E 201; Honors student. Designed for students of superior ability. Covers same core material as ECON-E 202 and substitutes for ECON-E 202 as a prerequisite for other courses. (3 credit hours.)
    • Elective. One (1) additional economics course at the 300–499 level, excluding ECON-E 370, ECON-X 373, and ECON-E 496.
  2. Political Science courses. Nine (9) credit hours chosen from the following:
    • Core course. One (1) course from the .
      • Introduces the design and development of political, economic, and social institutions that support democratic governance or its alternatives. Uses theory to understand connections among individual choice, collective action, institutions, and constitutional order. Institutional analysis as a mode of reasoning about contemporary policy problems, law, and public affairs. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduces the approaches and techniques used to study politics. Includes an introduction to social science language, concepts, and critical research skills. Overview of political science research approaches, including case study, surveys, and model-building. Emphasizes skills such as interpreting the presentation of data in charts, graphs, and tables, and elementary analysis of qualitative and quantitative data. (3 credit hours.)
      • Processes and institutions involved in the formation of public policy in American society. (3 credit hours.)
      • Place of theory and method in examining public policies in relation to programs, institutional arrangements, and constitutional problems. Particular reference to American political experience. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: One course in political science at the 200 level or above. R: ECON-E 201. Introduces collective choice and game theory for understanding how societies make political decisions. Examines how institutions, or the political context in which decisions are made, affect group choices. Theories of individual and group decision making, collective choice, and social dilemmas. Applications to congressional politics, intergovernmental relations, and parliamentary democracies. (3 credit hours.)
    • Electives. Six (6) additional credit hours from the .
      • The United States is unique among developed countries in not having a national health service. What we have instead are several health care sectors that vary according to which services are provided, by whom, to which beneficiaries, at whose expense. Each sector exhibits a distinctive pattern of politics. In this course we will compare and contrast the patterns of politics that surround different sectors of health policy. (3 credit hours.)
      • Explores the politics of crisis and reform from a comparative and international political economy perspective. In addition to learning general theories of crisis and reform, students will study in-depth case studies of important crisis episodes in the era of industrial capitalism, and seek to understand both the causes and consequences of crisis events. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the global challenges faced by democracy, including the difficulties encountered in the effort to build them and the hallowing of mature democracies through challenges posed by the forces of populism, nationalism, and authoritarianism. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduces the design and development of political, economic, and social institutions that support democratic governance or its alternatives. Uses theory to understand connections among individual choice, collective action, institutions, and constitutional order. Institutional analysis as a mode of reasoning about contemporary policy problems, law, and public affairs. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduces the approaches and techniques used to study politics. Includes an introduction to social science language, concepts, and critical research skills. Overview of political science research approaches, including case study, surveys, and model-building. Emphasizes skills such as interpreting the presentation of data in charts, graphs, and tables, and elementary analysis of qualitative and quantitative data. (3 credit hours.)
      • What's happening in current politics and governance? This course focuses on a contemporary issue or political event or process, covered at a more advanced level than POLS-Y 200. Topics vary from semester to semester and are listed in the online schedule of classes. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Theories of American party activity; behavior of political parties, interest groups, and social movements; membership in groups; organization and structure; evaluation and relationship to the process of representation. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines public bureaucracy, with special emphasis upon the United States, as a political phenomenon engaging in policy-making and in the definition of the terms of policy issues. Considers the role of bureaucratic instruments in promoting social change, and in responding to it. (3 credit hours.)
      • Processes and institutions involved in the formation of public policy in American society. (3 credit hours.)
      • American political powers and structures; selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting American constitutional system. (3 credit hours.)
      • Extent and limits of constitutional rights; selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting American constitutional system. (3 credit hours.)
      • Comparative study of politics in the American states. Special emphasis on the impact of political culture, party systems, legislatures, and bureaucracies on public policies. (3 credit hours.)
      • Constitutional foundations, political development, organizational and functional process and growth, and current problems of Indiana government. Readings, case studies, problems. (3 credit hours.)
      • Political behavior in modern American communities; emphasizes the impact of municipal organization, city officials and bureaucracies, social and economic notables, political parties, interest groups, the general public, and protest organizations on urban policy outcomes. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the processes of social decision reconciling human demands on the natural world with the ability of nature to sustain life and living standards. Analyzes the implications for public policies in complex sequential interactions among technical, economic, social, and political systems and considers the consequences of alternative courses of action. (3 credit hours.)
      • Determinants of voting behavior in elections. The nature of public opinion regarding major domestic and foreign policy issues; development of political ideology; other influences on the voting choices of individuals and the outcomes of elections; relationships among public opinion, elections, and the development of public policy. (3 credit hours.)
      • Values and social welfare policy. Development, current status, politics and proposals for reform of social security and private pensions, income maintenance policy, health care, and housing. The future of the welfare state. (3 credit hours.)
      • A survey of minority group politics in the United States. The course examines the socioeconomic position and political history of various demographic groups and highlights key public policy debates central to the future of ethnic politics and race relations in the United States. Compares theories of racial formation in the context of a political system predicated on majority rule. (3 credit hours.)
      • Development, structure, and functioning of political systems, primarily in France, Italy, and Germany. Political dynamics of European integration. (3 credit hours.)
      • Comparative study of Fascism, Nazism, and communism as institutional arrangements for governing modern societies. The political process in the one-party "movement regime." (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the key debates and issues regarding how "poor" countries develop economically and socially. Analyzes the interactions between politics and economics in the development process at the global, national, and local levels. Cases for comparison will include countries from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the Middle East. (3 credit hours.)
      • Focuses on politics in the developing world (Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East). Comparison of political history; experiences of colonialism and post-colonial authoritarian systems; political economy; development and globalization; democratization and management of protest and conflict; and interactions with international actors and transnational social movements. (3 credit hours.)
      • Compares public policies and policy making among both advanced industrial democracies and the developing world. Surveys policy areas such as immigration, health care, education, and workers' rights. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study of the politics of the European Union (EU). Assesses past and present dynamics of economic and political integration in Europe, the structure and work of European Union institutions, and EU public policies such as the Single Market, the common currency, common foreign and security policy, and trade. (3 credit hours.)
      • Theories about the interaction between the international economic and political systems are the subject of this course. Works from each of the main traditions—liberal, Marxist, and statist—will be assigned. Specific topics covered will include (among others): the politics of trade, aid, foreign investment, and international monetary affairs; theories of dependency and imperialism; the politics of international competition in specific industries; the stability/ instability of international economic regimes. (3 credit hours.)
      • Place of theory and method in examining public policies in relation to programs, institutional arrangements, and constitutional problems. Particular reference to American political experience. (3 credit hours.)
      • Origins and evolution of the UN; principal UN bodies, how they operate and what they do; who finances the UN; controversies and voting patterns in the UN; attitudes toward the UN and debates within member countries regarding its role; impact of UN activities and programs (e.g., conflict resolution and mediation, peacekeeping and peace enforcement; nation building, development aid, weapons proliferation, human rights, health, environment). Credit given for only one of NELC-N 398 or POLS-Y 399. (3 credit hours.)
      • Topic varies with the instructor and year; consult the online May be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (2–3 credit hours.)
      • P: One course in political science at the 200 level or above. R: ECON-E 201. Introduces collective choice and game theory for understanding how societies make political decisions. Examines how institutions, or the political context in which decisions are made, affect group choices. Theories of individual and group decision making, collective choice, and social dilemmas. Applications to congressional politics, intergovernmental relations, and parliamentary democracies. (3 credit hours.)
      • #Up to three (3) total credit hours of the following:#:
        • P: Junior or senior standing, 15 credit hours of political science, and project approval by instructor. Faculty-directed study of aspects of the political process based on field experience. Directed readings, field research, research papers. Certain internship experiences may require research skills. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in POLS-X 477 and POLS-Y 481. (1–6 credit hours.)
        • P: Senior standing or consent of department. Research paper required. Seminar sessions arranged to present papers for evaluation and criticism by fellow students. Subject matter varies by semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: Consent of instructor and departmental honors director. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–12 credit hours.)
  3. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the minor.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the minor—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to minor requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Notes

  • * This minor is not available to students choosing a major in economics or political science. The interdepartmental minor in Political Science and Economics is also not available to students pursuing a minor in political science or a minor in economics.