Majors, minors + certificates

Minor in English (ENGMIN)Department of English

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Minor in English provides students with a course of study that deepens literary and rhetorical analysis, builds critical writing skills, and offers specialized knowledge of particular genres, cultural forms, and literary history. The minor enhances a number of majors and career possibilities by foregrounding the power of language, critical analysis, and communication skills.

Minor requirements

The minor requires at least 15 credit hours (above the 100 level), including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introductory course. One (1) course from the .
    • P: Completion of the English composition requirement. R: Completion within the first 9 credit hours of the major. Introduces four principles essential to advanced study of literature: attention to language and varieties of figurative language, analysis of generic forms and modes, awareness of historical context and mediation of forms, and facility with traditional and contemporary theories of literature. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Introductory Genre course. One (1) course from the .
    • (must be approved for CASE Intensive Writing) Acquaints students with characteristics of drama as a type of literature through the study of representative significant plays. Readings will include plays from several ages and countries. (3 credit hours.)
    • (must be approved for CASE Intensive Writing) Representative works of fiction; structural techniques in the novel. Novels and short stories from several ages and countries. (3 credit hours.)
    • (must be approved for CASE Intensive Writing) Kinds, conventions, and elements of poetry in a selection of poems from several historical periods. (3 credit hours.)
    • (must be approved for CASE Intensive Writing) Varieties of nonfictional prose, such as autobiography, biography, and the essay. Representative works from several periods and countries. (3 credit hours.)
  3. Literary history courses. Two (2) courses from the lists below. Courses chosen must be from two (2) different
    • Beginnings through the Eighteenth Century
    • Chaucer's work, with special emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. (3 credit hours.)
    • Selected works such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Pearl, mystery and morality plays, and religious lyrics, read in Middle English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Drama from its beginnings in Medieval England through contemporaries of the early Shakespeare. (3 credit hours.)
    • English drama from Shakespeare’s time to the closing of the theaters in 1642 and beyond. (3 credit hours.)
    • Major Elizabethan poets, with special attention to Spenser. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Completion of the English composition requirement. R: Completion within first 21 credit hours of major. A broad overview of the varied origins and functions of literature in Medieval and Early Modern cultures. Tells the story of the consolidation of English language and literature. (3 credit hours.)
    • May not be taken concurrently with ENG-L 220. Close reading of at least seven early plays of Shakespeare. (3 credit hours.)
    • May not be taken concurrently with ENG-L 220. Close reading of at least seven later plays of Shakespeare. (3 credit hours.)
    • Major poets in England, 1600–1660. (3 credit hours.)
    • Poetry and prose of John Milton, with special attention to Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines a range of literary and cultural communications from the period of exploration and colonization of the Americas through the Revolutionary era. Special attention paid to the interactions between rhetoric and history, and to religious, scientific, political, racial, and literary discourses. (3 credit hours.)
    • Hebrew Bible and New Testament with emphasis on questions of reading and interpretation. (3 credit hours.)
    • Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
    • P: Completion of the English composition requirement. R: Completion within first 21 credit hours of major. A broad overview of the development of British and American literature in the era of empire, industry, and revolution. Tells the story of the expansion of English language and literature. (3 credit hours.)
    • Representative literary works from 1660 to the mid-eighteenth century, studied within their social context. (3 credit hours.)
    • Representative literary works from the mid-eighteenth century to 1800, studied within their social context. (3 credit hours.)
    • Development of English Drama from Puritan closing of playhouses into the nineteenth century. (3 credit hours.)
    • British literature and culture in the age of Romanticism and the revolutionary era (ca. 1780–1830). Poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction writings from major and minor authors, such as Austen, Blake, Byron, Coleridge, Keats, Scott, the Shelleys, Wollstonecraft, and the Wordsworths. (3 credit hours.)
    • Major poetry and prose, 1830–1900, studied against the social and intellectual background of period. (3 credit hours.)
    • Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such writers as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne. (3 credit hours.)
    • Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such writers as Scott, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. (3 credit hours.)
    • Studies a range of texts from the formative period of the republic to the end of the Civil War. Special attention paid to the shifting definitions and constructions of U.S. American national and cultural identity, as affected by issues of race, environment, transatlantic exchanges, scientific discourse, and the emergence of women writers. (3 credit hours.)
    • Surveys American literature through the development of realism, regionalism, naturalism, and the beginnings of modernism. Considers literature's relation to social and cultural phenomena of this era, such as urbanization, industrialization, immigration, racial tensions, labor strife, changing gender roles, and the spread of mass media and consumer culture. (3 credit hours.)
    • Surveys a range of literary fiction in nineteenth-century America, examining a variety of forms including the novel, sketch, short story, as well as modes (Gothic, romance, sentimental, adventure). Attention will be paid to the historical, cultural, and political contexts in which canonical and lesser-known authors wrote. (3 credit hours.)
    • Includes the work of Bradstreet, Taylor, the fireside poets, Poe, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, and Crane. (3 credit hours.)
    • Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries
    • P: Completion of the English composition requirement. R: Completion within first 21 credit hours of major. A broad overview of the spread of global English in the wake of Anglo-American ascendancy and the subsequent rise of post-colonial/diasporic literatures. Tells the story of the global dissemination of English and Anglophone literature. (3 credit hours.)
    • Modern poets, particularly Yeats, Eliot, Auden; some later poets may be included. (3 credit hours.)
    • Modern fiction, its techniques and experiments, particularly Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf; some later novelists may be included. (3 credit hours.)
    • Provides an understanding of the pivotal literary innovations and cultural changes during this period. Literary movements such as naturalism, realism, and modernism may be the subject of focus, as might changes in race and gender relations, labor politics, immigration policies, regionalism, and the increasing shift from agricultural to urban economics. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines the general trends and important contributions found in the work of major and minor American poets. (3 credit hours.)
    • Surveys literary expressions centered mainly in the first half of the twentieth century. Attention may be given to such literary movements as modernism and the Beats, as well as literature written by women and various ethnic populations. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines a range of literary forms and developments after the start of the Vietnam War. Special attention may be given to postmodernism, women's literature, ethnic literature, 1960s protest literature, and radical revisions of genres, forms and narrative strategies in the age of computerization. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines—but is not limited to—such nonfiction genres as the personal or political essay, science writing, journalism exposé, history, biography, film criticism, memoir, travel and speech writing. The instructor may focus on a particular genre or period. (3 credit hours.)
    • Main currents in American drama to the present. (3 credit hours.)
    • Special attention to Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett, and the theater of the absurd. (3 credit hours.)
    • Shaw, Synge, O’Neill, and other significant dramatists, such as Harold Pinter, Edward Albee, August Wilson, Athol Fugard, and Wole Soyinka. (3 credit hours.)
    • Literature about the American ethnic experience, selected from works by African American, Native American, Asian American, Chicano/a or Latino/a American, Jewish American, Italian American, Irish American, Arab American, and/or other ethnic American authors. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jewish authors, such as I. B. Singer and Elie Wiesel; groups of authors, such as Holocaust writers and writers about the immigrant experience; or genres and themes. Topic will vary from semester to semester. (3 credit hours.)
    • Phenomenon of modernism in early twentieth-century transatlantic literature, with emphasis on such writers as Joyce, Pound, Eliot, Stein, Lawrence, and Faulkner, studied in relation to social and artistic movements. (3 credit hours.)
    • Selected writers of contemporary significance. May include groups and movements (such as black writers, poets of projective verse, new regionalists, parajournalists and other experimenters in pop literature, folk writers, and distinctly ethnic writers); several recent novelists, poets, or critics; or any combination of groups. May be repeated once for credit by special arrangement with the Department of English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of a coherent phenomenon of African American literature and culture (such as Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, African American women’s autobiographies, black popular culture and literary expression, recent black fiction or poetry, or a cluster of major authors). (3 credit hours.)
  4. Electives. One English elective at the 300–499 level (may be fulfilled by a course from the Literary History lists if not used to fulfill requirement 3 above).
    • Focuses on linguistic analysis of present-day spoken and written English, with attention to its phonemic, morphemic, and syntactical systems and its system of expressive features. (3 credit hours.)
    • Topics vary from semester to semester. (3 credit hours.)
    • Chaucer's work, with special emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. (3 credit hours.)
    • Selected works such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Pearl, mystery and morality plays, and religious lyrics, read in Middle English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Drama from its beginnings in Medieval England through contemporaries of the early Shakespeare. (3 credit hours.)
    • English drama from Shakespeare’s time to the closing of the theaters in 1642 and beyond. (3 credit hours.)
    • Major Elizabethan poets, with special attention to Spenser. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Completion of the English composition requirement. R: Completion within first 21 credit hours of major. A broad overview of the varied origins and functions of literature in Medieval and Early Modern cultures. Tells the story of the consolidation of English language and literature. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Completion of the English composition requirement. R: Completion within first 21 credit hours of major. A broad overview of the development of British and American literature in the era of empire, industry, and revolution. Tells the story of the expansion of English language and literature. (3 credit hours.)
    • May not be taken concurrently with ENG-L 220. Close reading of at least seven early plays of Shakespeare. (3 credit hours.)
    • May not be taken concurrently with ENG-L 220. Close reading of at least seven later plays of Shakespeare. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Completion of the English composition requirement. R: Completion within first 21 credit hours of major. A broad overview of the spread of global English in the wake of Anglo-American ascendancy and the subsequent rise of post-colonial/diasporic literatures. Tells the story of the global dissemination of English and Anglophone literature. (3 credit hours.)
    • Major poets in England, 1600–1660. (3 credit hours.)
    • Poetry and prose of John Milton, with special attention to Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. (3 credit hours.)
    • Representative literary works from 1660 to the mid-eighteenth century, studied within their social context. (3 credit hours.)
    • Representative literary works from the mid-eighteenth century to 1800, studied within their social context. (3 credit hours.)
    • Development of English Drama from Puritan closing of playhouses into the nineteenth century. (3 credit hours.)
    • British literature and culture in the age of Romanticism and the revolutionary era (ca. 1780–1830). Poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction writings from major and minor authors, such as Austen, Blake, Byron, Coleridge, Keats, Scott, the Shelleys, Wollstonecraft, and the Wordsworths. (3 credit hours.)
    • Major poetry and prose, 1830–1900, studied against the social and intellectual background of period. (3 credit hours.)
    • Modern poets, particularly Yeats, Eliot, Auden; some later poets may be included. (3 credit hours.)
    • Modern fiction, its techniques and experiments, particularly Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf; some later novelists may be included. (3 credit hours.)
    • Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such writers as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne. (3 credit hours.)
    • Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such writers as Scott, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines a range of literary and cultural communications from the period of exploration and colonization of the Americas through the Revolutionary era. Special attention paid to the interactions between rhetoric and history, and to religious, scientific, political, racial, and literary discourses. (3 credit hours.)
    • Studies a range of texts from the formative period of the republic to the end of the Civil War. Special attention paid to the shifting definitions and constructions of U.S. American national and cultural identity, as affected by issues of race, environment, transatlantic exchanges, scientific discourse, and the emergence of women writers. (3 credit hours.)
    • Surveys American literature through the development of realism, regionalism, naturalism, and the beginnings of modernism. Considers literature's relation to social and cultural phenomena of this era, such as urbanization, industrialization, immigration, racial tensions, labor strife, changing gender roles, and the spread of mass media and consumer culture. (3 credit hours.)
    • Provides an understanding of the pivotal literary innovations and cultural changes during this period. Literary movements such as naturalism, realism, and modernism may be the subject of focus, as might changes in race and gender relations, labor politics, immigration policies, regionalism, and the increasing shift from agricultural to urban economics. (3 credit hours.)
    • Surveys a range of literary fiction in nineteenth-century America, examining a variety of forms including the novel, sketch, short story, as well as modes (Gothic, romance, sentimental, adventure). Attention will be paid to the historical, cultural, and political contexts in which canonical and lesser-known authors wrote. (3 credit hours.)
    • Includes the work of Bradstreet, Taylor, the fireside poets, Poe, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, and Crane. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines the general trends and important contributions found in the work of major and minor American poets. (3 credit hours.)
    • Surveys literary expressions centered mainly in the first half of the twentieth century. Attention may be given to such literary movements as modernism and the Beats, as well as literature written by women and various ethnic populations. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines a range of literary forms and developments after the start of the Vietnam War. Special attention may be given to postmodernism, women's literature, ethnic literature, 1960s protest literature, and radical revisions of genres, forms and narrative strategies in the age of computerization. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines—but is not limited to—such nonfiction genres as the personal or political essay, science writing, journalism exposé, history, biography, film criticism, memoir, travel and speech writing. The instructor may focus on a particular genre or period. (3 credit hours.)
    • Main currents in American drama to the present. (3 credit hours.)
    • Surveys traditional and modern literature by American Indians, especially of the high plains and southwest culture areas, with particular attention to the image of the Indian in both native and white literature. (3 credit hours.)
    • Special attention to Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett, and the theater of the absurd. (3 credit hours.)
    • Shaw, Synge, O’Neill, and other significant dramatists, such as Harold Pinter, Edward Albee, August Wilson, Athol Fugard, and Wole Soyinka. (3 credit hours.)
    • Hebrew Bible and New Testament with emphasis on questions of reading and interpretation. (3 credit hours.)
    • Studies in single authors (such as Wordsworth and Melville), groups of authors (such as minority writers), and periods (such as American writers of the 1920s). Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-L 260 with grade of C- or higher. Study of and practice in using contemporary critical methodologies; can be focused on specific topics. (3 credit hours.)
    • Social, political, and psychological studies in English and American literature, 1890 to the present. Topics may vary and include, for example, Freud and literature, responses to revolution, and the literature of technology. (3 credit hours.)
    • Literature about the American ethnic experience, selected from works by African American, Native American, Asian American, Chicano/a or Latino/a American, Jewish American, Italian American, Irish American, Arab American, and/or other ethnic American authors. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jewish authors, such as I. B. Singer and Elie Wiesel; groups of authors, such as Holocaust writers and writers about the immigrant experience; or genres and themes. Topic will vary from semester to semester. (3 credit hours.)
    • British and American authors such as George Eliot, Gertrude Stein; groups of authors, such as the Brontë sisters, recent women poets; or genres and modes, such as autobiography, film, and criticism. Topics will vary from semester to semester. (3 credit hours.)
    • Phenomenon of modernism in early twentieth-century transatlantic literature, with emphasis on such writers as Joyce, Pound, Eliot, Stein, Lawrence, and Faulkner, studied in relation to social and artistic movements. (3 credit hours.)
    • Selected writers of contemporary significance. May include groups and movements (such as black writers, poets of projective verse, new regionalists, parajournalists and other experimenters in pop literature, folk writers, and distinctly ethnic writers); several recent novelists, poets, or critics; or any combination of groups. May be repeated once for credit by special arrangement with the Department of English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of a coherent period of British or Commonwealth culture (such as medieval, Elizabethan, or Victorian England, or modern Canada), with attention to the relations between literature, the other arts, and the intellectual milieu. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of a coherent period of American culture (such as the Revolution, the Progressive Era, the Great Depression), with attention to the relations between literature, the other arts, and the intellectual milieu. (3 credit hours.)
    • Selected critical approaches to the issue of gender over time and in various cultural settings. Topics vary, but may include feminist criticism and popular culture, the history of feminist expository prose, or deconstructionism and feminism. (3 credit hours.)
    • Historical and modern children’s books and selections from books; designed to assist future teachers, parents, librarians, or others in selecting the best in children’s literature for each period of the child’s life. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of books suitable for junior high and high school classroom use. Special stress on works of fiction dealing with contemporary problems, but also including modern classics, biography, science fiction, and other areas of interest to teenage readers. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to the literary and poetic dimensions of various forms of contemporary graphic literature. Readings draw from graphic memoirs, graphic fiction, comics, and other varieties of graphic storytelling. (3 credit hours.)
    • Intensive study of specific topics related to film narratives; emphasis on American or British film as a cultural phenomenon. Topic varies. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of a coherent phenomenon of African American literature and culture (such as Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, African American women’s autobiographies, black popular culture and literary expression, recent black fiction or poetry, or a cluster of major authors). (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-L 260; and one of ENG-L 203, ENG-L 204, ENG-L 205, or ENG-L 206. Small seminar on various topics, encouraging independent thinking and research methods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: Junior or senior standing. Intensive study of a major author or a school of closely related authors. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: Junior or senior standing. Study of texts written in several historical periods united by a common mode or form (narrative, romanticism, lyric, etc.), or by a common theme (Bildungsroman, the city and the country, the two cultures question, the uses of literacy, etc.). (3 credit hours.)
    • R: Junior or senior standing. Study of a body of English or American literature in relation to another discipline (philosophy, art history, linguistics, psychology, etc.), or in light of critical theory (structuralist, psychoanalytic, genre theory, etc.). (3 credit hours.)
    • R: Junior or senior standing. Study of a body of literature in relation to a period of history, to a theory of history, or to a historical theme. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Approval of department's Honors Director. May be repeated once for credit. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-W 203. Further exploration in the art of fiction writing. May be repeated once for credit. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-W 203. Further exploration in the art of poetry writing. May be repeated once for credit. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-W 203. Writing workshop in such modes as personal essay, autobiography, and documentary. May be repeated once for credit. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-W 231. Offers instruction in preparing technical proposals and reports, with an introduction to the use of graphics. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Completion of the English composition requirement. Advanced writing course focuses on the interconnected activities of writing and reading, especially the kinds of responding, analyzing, and evaluating that characterize work in many fields in the university. Topics vary from semester to semester. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-W 203, ENG-W 301, or ENG-W 311; or consent of the instructor. Designed primarily for the creative writing student: the study and practice of the techniques used in the writing of fiction, including point of view, narrative distance, plot, characterization, setting, and tone. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-W 203, ENG-W 303, or consent of the instructor. Designed primarily for the creative writing student. The study and practice of the techniques used in the writing of poetry, including meter and other rhythmic structures more commonly relied on in nonmetrical or free verse, such as rhyme, alliteration, and stanza structures. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-W 301; or consent of instructor. Focused work in the art and profession of fiction writing. May be repeated once for credit. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-W 303; or consent of instructor. Focused work in the art and profession of poetry writing. May be repeated once for credit. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Acceptance to the Indiana Writers' Conference. May be counted as part of the major. Intensive training in various forms of writing. May be repeated once for credit. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-W 311; or consent of instructor. Writing workshop in such modes as personal essay, autobiography, and documentary. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
  5. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the minor.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the minor—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to minor requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Notes

  • * ENG-W 202 and ENG-W 205 are not approved for inclusion in the minor.
  • * Students may complete both the minor in English and another minor offered by the Department of English as long as different courses are chosen to complete each minor. Students pursuing a major in English are not eligible for this minor.