Majors, minors + certificates

Minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ENSUSTMIN)Integrated Program in the Environment

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The curriculum of the Environmental and Sustainability Studies minor is designed to provide students a broad introduction to the complex system-scale challenges of sustainability as well as the tools needed to address problems that transcend solely social or environmental domains. It combines introductory coursework with classes on human–environment systems.

Minor requirements

The minor requires at least 18 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introduction to Sustainability Studies. One (1) course from the .
    • How do humans relate to the environment? Addresses this question from cross-cultural, historical, scientific, and ethical perspectives. Considers current problems; examines how technical, socioeconomic and political changes transform people's use of natural resources. Students evaluate how societies vary in perceptions of nature and explore implications for behavior, decision making, and environmental change. (3 credit hours.)
    • How has the global environment changed? How are we influencing Earth's natural processes, now and in the future? Learn about climate change, resource consumption, and land use change. (3 credit hours.)
    • Just as we shape the environment, the environment shapes us. From globalization to food production to climate change, learn how humans and environments interact. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
  2. Human-Environment Systems. One (1) course from the .
    • When we think of nature, what images come to mind? How are ideas of nature influenced by culture, history, and politics? By the end of the semester, students will recognize how environments represent a collection, not only of plants and animals, but also of meanings and relationships. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines processes of globalization and economic and cultural integration, including the origin and spread of mass-consumer society. Topics include the theories of consumption, mass media and advertising, and the relationship between modernity and consumerism. Examples from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the United States are included. (3 credit hours.)
    • Seminar course that explores major theories and approaches to conservation, from "fortress conservation" to community-based and participatory strategies. Considers the implications of protected areas for local human populations and cultural diversity. Evaluates outcomes and unintended consequences of protected areas, and controversies over the "best" way to protect natural resources. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Pleasure, Pain, and Peak Oil ") Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 103 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the arts and humanities Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 103 or COLL-S 103. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Language Hotspots and Biodiversity ") Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 104 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the social and historical studies Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 104 or COLL-S 104. (3 credit hours.)
    • Explores the stories that people tell about the relations between humans and the natural world and the ways that natural disasters operate as both reality and idea. Considers issues drawn from world historical cases and how environmental history and catastrophes transcend political boundaries. (3 credit hours.)
    • Explores the environmental impact of global population growth, natural resources utilization, and pollution. Examines current problems relating to energy consumption, farming practices, water use, resource development and deforestation from geologic and ecological perspectives. Strategies designed to avert predicted global catastrophe will be examined to determine success potential. (3 credit hours.)
    • Can humans restore ecosystems and undo the environmental harm they have caused? To what state/extent should ecosystems be restored? What drives the ecological restoration movement? Investigates the deeply interconnected history, philosophy, ecology, geomorphology, and political economy of restoration through readings, discussions, and fieldwork. (3 credit hours.)
    • Reviews social science theoretical frameworks to explain environmental behavior and decisions, and implications for effective environmental management policies and methodologies. Topics include global changes in land/climate systems; sustainable development; property regimes; vulnerability and adaptation; integrative-interdisciplinary methods for environmental management; equity and participatory decision-making, etc. (3 credit hours.)
    • Presents the fundamentals of specialty crop and animal sustainable agriculture based on an agro-ecological framework. Study and application of ecological, social, and economic concepts in evaluating for farm sustainability. Includes both in-class and field lab experiences. (3 credit hours.)
    • An examination of the notion of sustainable development and its meaning as well as the manner in which it has been implemented in the areas of resources, agriculture, water, transport, cities, and tourism. How such systems can be implemented in developing and developed countries will also be examined. (3 credit hours.)
    • Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are causing climate to change at an unprecedented rate. This course will explain how and why anthropogenic activity is causing climate to change, how this impacts society and options for adaptation and mitigation, plus the potential to reduce climate change through geoengineering. (3 credit hours.)
    • How has nature been appropriated, reworked, and produced under capitalism; conversely, how does the materiality of nature shape the conditions of capitalism? In this seminar, we will investigate how relations between capitalism and nature have evolved from the end of feudalism through the current neoliberal era. (3 credit hours.)
    • An introduction to political ecology, an approach which focuses on the political-economic context of natural resource conflicts with particular attention to issues of equity, justice, and power. Covers the theoretical lineage of political ecology, its development over the last twenty years, and current hot topics in the field. (3 credit hours.)
    • Do we control water, or does it control us? Introduces geographic perspectives on the interaction of water and society. Takes the holistic view and asks the big questions about how water shapes, and is shaped by, social, political, and cultural dynamics. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to food production and consumption systems, emphasizing linkages to land use and social change on food/farming system sustainability. Topics include urbanization, population growth, and economic liberalization; farming livelihoods, gender, and poverty; biotechnology; agro-ecology, global health. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Arctic Encounters: Animals, People and Ships ") Advanced topics examining pressing health and environmental challenges around the world. Focuses on the interaction of health and environmental problems that cross national borders and require a multinational or global effort to solve. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics: "Nature and the City"; "Negotiating Climate: Culture, Science, Politics ") Interdisciplinary study of comparative environmental issues around the world. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines the processes of social decision reconciling human demands on the natural world with the ability of nature to sustain life and living standards. Analyzes the implications for public policies in complex sequential interactions among technical, economic, social, and political systems and considers the consequences of alternative courses of action. (3 credit hours.)
    • Online course that examines topics related to green building design and technologies, including sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy efficiency, materials and resources, indoor environmental quality, and LEED Exam preparation. Credit given for only one of AMID-D 203 or SOAD-D 203. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topic: "Food systems and community resilience ") No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topic: "Environmental Law, Justice and Politics ") No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
  3. Focal Area. One (1) of the following:
    1. Sustainable Food Systems.
      • Core Courses. Two (2) courses from the .
        • Discussion of the economy of food production, trade and consumption on a global basis. Gives a cross-cultural and historical perspective on the development of cooking and cuisine in relationship to individual, national, and ethnic identity. Relates cuisine to modernity, migration, and forms of cultural mixing and Creolization. (3 credit hours.)
        • Promotes understanding of the history and geographic distribution of the world's food cultures. Focuses on the material aspects of food and food's relationship to society. Increases knowledge of food and cultures through reading, discussion and cooking. (3 credit hours.)
        • How is the production and consumption of food related to poverty and development? Explores how global food systems affect farmers, farmworkers, retailers and consumers; the ways scientific advances changed rural economies in the Third World; and the history of famine and contemporary food security issues. (3 credit hours.)
        • Introduction to food production and consumption systems, emphasizing linkages to land use and social change on food/farming system sustainability. Topics include urbanization, population growth, and economic liberalization; farming livelihoods, gender, and poverty; biotechnology; agro-ecology, global health. (3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topic: "Food systems and community resilience") No description is available for this course.
      • Elective Courses. Two (2) courses from the .
        • Selected topics in anthropological methods, techniques, and area or thematic studies. Course content will draw on the fieldwork experiences and/or current research of the instructor(s). May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
        • (approved topic: "Chocolate: Local Farmers, Global Economies ") Intensive examination of selected topics in anthropology. Emphasis on analytic investigation and critical discussion. Topics vary. May be taken with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
        • Discussion of the economy of food production, trade and consumption on a global basis. Gives a cross-cultural and historical perspective on the development of cooking and cuisine in relationship to individual, national, and ethnic identity. Relates cuisine to modernity, migration, and forms of cultural mixing and Creolization. (3 credit hours.)
        • Explores many different aspects of the food movement in a single course. Topics include organic agriculture, school lunch reform, farm-to-school programs, urban agriculture and food sovereignty using a multi-disciplinary perspective. (3 credit hours.)
        • This course examines the experience of food insecurity in the USA, the role of poverty in food production and consumption, and the current mitigation strategies and social movements challenging the global food regime. Students will learn the differences and connections between concepts of food security, food justice, and food sovereignty. Relationships between food and gender, race, and ethnicity will be explored, along with the geographical and social concepts of food deserts and food choice. (3 credit hours.)
        • From connecting with the earth to changing the food system, this course digs into the narratives surrounding community gardens and community orchards. Explores topics like sustainability, food justice, and the pastoral roots of these projects. Utilizes multimedia, speakers from community projects, and class discussion. (3 credit hours.)
        • Presents the fundamentals of specialty crop and animal sustainable agriculture based on an agro-ecological framework. Study and application of ecological, social, and economic concepts in evaluating for farm sustainability. Includes both in-class and field lab experiences. (3 credit hours.)
        • Promotes understanding of the history and geographic distribution of the world's food cultures. Focuses on the material aspects of food and food's relationship to society. Increases knowledge of food and cultures through reading, discussion and cooking. (3 credit hours.)
        • How is the production and consumption of food related to poverty and development? Explores how global food systems affect farmers, farmworkers, retailers and consumers; the ways scientific advances changed rural economies in the Third World; and the history of famine and contemporary food security issues. (3 credit hours.)
        • Introduction to food production and consumption systems, emphasizing linkages to land use and social change on food/farming system sustainability. Topics include urbanization, population growth, and economic liberalization; farming livelihoods, gender, and poverty; biotechnology; agro-ecology, global health. (3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topic: "Food Security ") Examines issues of international scope through service learning projects. Content varies with instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in INTL-I 435 and INTL-X 370. (3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topic: "Roots, Fruits, and Jamaican Ecologies ") Intensive study and analysis of selected Latin American and Caribbean problems of limited scope within an interdisciplinary format. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, or periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topics: "Farming the City: Global Perspectives on Urban Agriculture and Food Security"; "Permaculture"; " Food systems and community resilience ") No description is available for this course.
        • Independent study, readings, research, or practicum in sustainable food systems from any department (3 cr.) with pre-approval of the Program. (Note: This option can be used only once.)
    2. Sustainable Energy, Resources and Climate. Four (4) courses from the .
      • Sustainable Energy
      • (approved topic: "International energy markets: Environmental, Economic and Health Aspects ") This course focuses on the intensive study and analysis of selected international problems and issues within an interdisciplinary format. Topics will vary but will cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-H 221, PHYS-P 201, or PHYS-P 221; MATH-M 211; or consent of instructor. For biological and physical science majors. Relationship of physics to current environmental problems. Energy production, comparison of sources and byproducts; nature of and possible solutions to problems of noise, particulate matter in atmosphere. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics: "The Foundations of LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)"; "Environmental Sustainability ") No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • (approved topics: "Public Transit Management"; "Climate Change and Electricity ") No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • Sustainable Resources
      • P: One of EAS-E 225 or GEOL-G 225; and one of EAS-E 226 or GEOL-G 226. Integrative treatment of sedimentology, stratigraphy, and structural geology. Examines links between tectonic deformation processes and the resulting sediment that forms the stratigraphic rock record. Description of sedimentary rocks, from basic features at the bed-scale to scales of sedimentary basins. Learning and applying the facies concept and using stratigraphic principles to correlate facies across sedimentary basins. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 333, EAS-E 334, GEOL-G 333, or GEOL-G 334. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: CHEM-C 103, CHEM-C 105, CHEM-C 117, or CHEM-S 117; and PHYS-H 221, PHYS-P 201, or PHYS-P 221. Introduction to hydrology, physical properties of water relating to heat transfer and flow, phases of water and phase changes, water as a solvent and transporting agent, water budgets at various scales of inquiry, fluid pressure and potential, and fluid flow at the surface and subsurface of the earth. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 351 or GEOL-G 351. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: EAS-E 225 or GEOL-G 225; and EAS-E 226 or GEOL-G 226; and CHEM-C 117 or CHEM-S 117. Origin, geologic occurrence, distribution, use, and conservation of important geologic natural resources. Metallic minerals; industrial minerals and rocks; coal, petroleum, natural gas, and other energy resources. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 416 and GEOL-G 416. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: CHEM-C 117 or CHEM-S 117; and MATH-M 211 or MATH-S 211. Physical and chemical properties of water; chemical equilibria and stable isotopes in groundwaters; acid drainage, landfills, and agricultural pollution; Darcy's Law, fluid potential, unsaturated flow; fluid and aquifer properties affecting groundwater flow; fluid mass-balance equation and its application; contaminant transport. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 451 and GEOL-G 451. (2–4 credit hours.)
      • Explores cases of water security and sustainability throughout the world, including the western United States and south Asia. Students will develop research and interpretation skills with quantitative, qualitative, and cartographic water data through engagement with research and policy documents and learn how to critique and articulate recommendations for water policy. Credit given for only one of GEOG-G 259 or GEOG-G 347. (3 credit hours.)
      • Explores the science, politics, and ethics of water in the Midwest from the Bloomington campus to the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Basins. Critically examines such water issues as pollution, environmental justice, flooding, invasive species, agricultural and urban water demand, and effective regulation. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to hydrological processes occurring at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Principles of water resources such as infiltration, runoff, surface- and groundwater flow will be explored. Topics covered also include the environmental, economic, and social implications of floods, droughts, dams, and water usage as well as current and future issues in water quality, water pollution, and water–resource regulation. (3 credit hours.)
      • Do we control water, or does it control us? Introduces geographic perspectives on the interaction of water and society. Takes the holistic view and asks the big questions about how water shapes, and is shaped by, social, political, and cultural dynamics. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: GEOG-G 107 or GEOG-G 109. Introduces basic principles and concepts in forest ecohydrology, focusing on modeling perspectives. Examines processes and feedback among water, carbon, and nitrogen fluxes in application to water resources and forest management: control of climate, vegetation change, and disturbance regimes on hydrological and biogeochemical processes. (3 credit hours.)
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • Climate Studies
      • P: Any introductory science course or consent of instructor. Topics span multiple scales of atmospheric processes including past/recent/projected climate change, weather forecasting, severe weather, and surface energy budgets. Students gain knowledge concerning physical processes and properties of Earth's atmosphere and acquire skills used to study and quantify atmospheric processes through problem solving with models and remote sensing data. Credit given for only one of EAS-A 340, GEOG-G 304, or GEOL-G 340. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: At least two undergraduate physical science courses or consent of instructor. Evidence for and theories of climate change over a range of time scales. Sources of natural climate forcing are presented, historical evolution of climate change is quantified, and model tools and climate projections are presented along with analyses of climate change impacts. Credit given for only one of EAS-A 476, GEOG-G 475, or GEOL-G 476. (3 credit hours.)
      • Earth's climate is linked to geological processes and life on our planet. Covers climate systems in the context of changes in continents, atmospheric composition, and life on land and in the oceans. Focuses on interactions between humans and climate and how climate and its variability are tied to Earth systems. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 227 or GEOL-G 227. (3 credit hours.)
      • An examination of current problems concerning climate, land and environmental change from a geographical perspective. The specific topic to be considered will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Surveys the relationship between climate and vegetation and explores the consequences of human impacts. Examines the role of climate on vegetation patterns, agricultural crops, and select ecosystems and in turn, the influence of vegetation on climate. (3 credit hours.)
      • Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are causing climate to change at an unprecedented rate. This course will explain how and why anthropogenic activity is causing climate to change, how this impacts society and options for adaptation and mitigation, plus the potential to reduce climate change through geoengineering. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Negotiating Climate: Culture, Science, Politics ") Interdisciplinary study of comparative environmental issues around the world. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "International Climate Governance: IU Delegation to COP ") In-depth study and analysis of an international problem, culminating in a research project. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Communicating Climate Change ") P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 213 or TEL-T 205; or consent of instructor. Exploration of social problems and issues. Topics vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours in MSCH-S 451 and TEL-T 451. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • Policy and Development
      • P: At least two undergraduate physical science courses or consent of instructor. Evidence for and theories of climate change over a range of time scales. Sources of natural climate forcing are presented, historical evolution of climate change is quantified, and model tools and climate projections are presented along with analyses of climate change impacts. Credit given for only one of EAS-A 476, GEOG-G 475, or GEOL-G 476. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Environmental and Energy Diplomacy ") P: Open to junior and senior majors by special consent. Readings and discussion of selected topics. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 completions and 18 credit hours of EAS-E 490 or GEOL-G 490. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • An examination of the notion of sustainable development and its meaning as well as the manner in which it has been implemented in the areas of resources, agriculture, water, transport, cities, and tourism. How such systems can be implemented in developing and developed countries will also be examined. (3 credit hours.)
      • How has nature been appropriated, reworked, and produced under capitalism; conversely, how does the materiality of nature shape the conditions of capitalism? In this seminar, we will investigate how relations between capitalism and nature have evolved from the end of feudalism through the current neoliberal era. (3 credit hours.)
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • Independent study, readings, research, or practicum in sustainable energy, resources and climate from any department with pre-approval from the Program
    3. Environmental Ethics and Justice.
      • Core Courses. Two (2) courses from the .
        • When we think of nature, what images come to mind? How are ideas of nature influenced by culture, history, and politics? By the end of the semester, students will recognize how environments represent a collection, not only of plants and animals, but also of meanings and relationships. (3 credit hours.)
        • Seminar course that explores major theories and approaches to conservation, from "fortress conservation" to community-based and participatory strategies. Considers the implications of protected areas for local human populations and cultural diversity. Evaluates outcomes and unintended consequences of protected areas, and controversies over the "best" way to protect natural resources. (3 credit hours.)
        • Can humans restore ecosystems and undo the environmental harm they have caused? To what state/extent should ecosystems be restored? What drives the ecological restoration movement? Investigates the deeply interconnected history, philosophy, ecology, geomorphology, and political economy of restoration through readings, discussions, and fieldwork. (3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topic: "Environmental Justice") Interdisciplinary study of comparative environmental justice issues around the world. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
        • Exploration of relationships between religious worldviews and environmental ethics. Considers environmental critiques and defenses of monotheistic traditions, selected non-Western traditions, the impact of secular “mythologies,” philosophical questions, and lifestyle issues. Credit given for only one of REL-D 350 or REL-R 371. (3 credit hours.)
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
      • Elective Courses. Two (2) courses from the .
        • When we think of nature, what images come to mind? How are ideas of nature influenced by culture, history, and politics? By the end of the semester, students will recognize how environments represent a collection, not only of plants and animals, but also of meanings and relationships. (3 credit hours.)
        • Seminar course that explores major theories and approaches to conservation, from "fortress conservation" to community-based and participatory strategies. Considers the implications of protected areas for local human populations and cultural diversity. Evaluates outcomes and unintended consequences of protected areas, and controversies over the "best" way to protect natural resources. (3 credit hours.)
        • (program approval required; see academic advisor ) Selected critical approaches to the issue of gender over time and in various cultural settings. Topics vary, but may include feminist criticism and popular culture, the history of feminist expository prose, or deconstructionism and feminism. (3 credit hours.)
        • 'Sustainability' is the capacity to negotiate environmental, social, and economic needs and desires for current and future generations. Traces historical and global discourses of sustainability; defines key terms and frames sustainability; engages related concepts of democracy, citizenship, and community; and develops critical thinking, research, and communication skills. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 212 or ENG-R 212. (3 credit hours.)
        • This class is grounded in the perspective that symbolic and natural systems are mutually constituted and therefore, the ways we communicate about and with the environment are vital to examine for a sustainable and just future. The focus of the class may vary to engage topics such as environmental tourism or environmental disasters. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 348 or ENG-R 348. (3 credit hours.)
        • Explores the environmental impact of global population growth, natural resources utilization, and pollution. Examines current problems relating to energy consumption, farming practices, water use, resource development and deforestation from geologic and ecological perspectives. Strategies designed to avert predicted global catastrophe will be examined to determine success potential. (3 credit hours.)
        • Can humans restore ecosystems and undo the environmental harm they have caused? To what state/extent should ecosystems be restored? What drives the ecological restoration movement? Investigates the deeply interconnected history, philosophy, ecology, geomorphology, and political economy of restoration through readings, discussions, and fieldwork. (3 credit hours.)
        • How has nature been appropriated, reworked, and produced under capitalism; conversely, how does the materiality of nature shape the conditions of capitalism? In this seminar, we will investigate how relations between capitalism and nature have evolved from the end of feudalism through the current neoliberal era. (3 credit hours.)
        • An introduction to political ecology, an approach which focuses on the political-economic context of natural resource conflicts with particular attention to issues of equity, justice, and power. Covers the theoretical lineage of political ecology, its development over the last twenty years, and current hot topics in the field. (3 credit hours.)
        • Introduction to global environmental change (GEC), focusing on the human causes and consequences of biophysical transformations of land systems. Emphasis on socioeconomic, political, institutional, and environmental dimensions of land change; tropical forests, grasslands, and urbanizing areas; international environmental regimes; spatial methodologies in GEC research, and integrated approaches. (3 credit hours.)
        • How and why do farms, rivers, minerals, and forests shape politics? Uses in-depth case studies from South Asia to provide an introduction to theoretical approaches to environmental politics, and to one of the most complex, diverse and fascinating regions of the world. (3 credit hours.)
        • Science is governed by methods: methods for performing experiments, analyzing data, testing hypotheses, and writing scientific papers. This course frames the philosophical and historical debates about scientific methods and introduces the conceptual tools to discuss and reflect on the rules and procedures that make the pursuit of knowledge scientific. (3 credit hours.)
        • Examines trees and forests as conspicuous natural objects that play a multivalent role in human imagination, thinking, and emotion. Explores the intertwined natural and cultural trajectory of trees in evolutionary, historical, and psychological dimensions. Topics include ecosystem services, human uses and attitudes, deforestation, IU's woodland campus, and ecological ethics. (3 credit hours.)
        • Examination of pressing health and environmental challenges around the world, such as deforestation, climate change and the spread of infectious diseases. Focuses on the interaction of health and environmental problems that cross national borders and require a multinational or global effort to solve. (3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topic: "Environmental Justice ") Interdisciplinary study of comparative environmental justice issues around the world. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
        • Deep ecology seeks fundamental transformations in views of world and self. It claims that there is no ontological divide in the forms of life and aims for an environmentally sustainable and spiritually rich way of life. This course is an introductory examination of Deep Ecology from a religious studies perspective. Credit given for only one of REL-D 250 or REL-R 236. (3 credit hours.)
        • Exploration of relationships between religious worldviews and environmental ethics. Considers environmental critiques and defenses of monotheistic traditions, selected non-Western traditions, the impact of secular “mythologies,” philosophical questions, and lifestyle issues. Credit given for only one of REL-D 350 or REL-R 371. (3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topic: "God Species ") Intensive study of a selected problem in religion and society such as religion and American politics, war and conscience, medical ethics. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topic: "Religion and Animals ") Selected topics, issues, and movements in religion. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topic: "Religion, Ethics, and the Global Environmental Crisis ") Selected topics and movements in religion. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topic: "Environmental Law, Justice and Politics ") No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • Independent study, readings, research, or practicum in environmental ethics and justice from any department (3 cr.) with pre-approval of the Program (Note: This option can be used only once.)
    4. Biodiversity and Sustainability.
      • Core Courses. Two (2) courses from the .
        • P: BIOL-L 111. Provides a strong framework and hands-on experience studying biodiversity. Course transitions between introductory materials considered in BIOL-L 111 and BIOL-L 112 and more advanced courses focused on specific groups of organisms (for example, vertebrate zoology). Includes field and lab components where local biodiversity is sampled and analyzed. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: 100-level Biology; or consent of instructor. An interdisciplinary, place-based approach to understanding biological diversity and its relationship to flourishing human societies, and to developing associated skills and values (e.g. interdisciplinary thinking and action, stewardship). (3 credit hours.)
        • A survey of the present and past distributions of the world's plants and animals, emphasizing ecological explanation of species distributions. Topics include evolution and distribution of major plant and animal groups, world vegetation, plant and animal domestication, introduction of plant and animal pests, destruction of natural communities, and extinction. (3 credit hours.)
        • Explores the environmental impact of global population growth, natural resources utilization, and pollution. Examines current problems relating to energy consumption, farming practices, water use, resource development and deforestation from geologic and ecological perspectives. Strategies designed to avert predicted global catastrophe will be examined to determine success potential. (3 credit hours.)
        • Examines trees and forests as conspicuous natural objects that play a multivalent role in human imagination, thinking, and emotion. Explores the intertwined natural and cultural trajectory of trees in evolutionary, historical, and psychological dimensions. Topics include ecosystem services, human uses and attitudes, deforestation, IU's woodland campus, and ecological ethics. (3 credit hours.)
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
      • Elective Courses. Two (2) courses from the .
        • (approved topic: "Evolution of the Human Ecological Footprint ") Selected topics in bioanthropology. Analysis of research. Development of skills in analysis and criticism. Topic varies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
        • Seminar course that explores major theories and approaches to conservation, from "fortress conservation" to community-based and participatory strategies. Considers the implications of protected areas for local human populations and cultural diversity. Evaluates outcomes and unintended consequences of protected areas, and controversies over the "best" way to protect natural resources. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: One introductory biology course. Survey of the ferns, gymnosperms, and flowering plants, including their morphology, classification, ecology, evolution, and economic importance. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. R: Junior or senior standing. Morphology, life histories, classification, genetics, physiology, development, ecology, medical and economic importance of fungi. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: One introductory biology course. For those desiring a broad, practical knowledge of common wild and cultivated plants. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: BIOL-L 111. Provides a strong framework and hands-on experience studying biodiversity. Course transitions between introductory materials considered in BIOL-L 111 and BIOL-L 112 and more advanced courses focused on specific groups of organisms (for example, vertebrate zoology). Includes field and lab components where local biodiversity is sampled and analyzed. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: 100-level Biology; or consent of instructor. An interdisciplinary, place-based approach to understanding biological diversity and its relationship to flourishing human societies, and to developing associated skills and values (e.g. interdisciplinary thinking and action, stewardship). (3 credit hours.)
        • P: Junior or senior standing. Not open to biology majors. Basic concepts and principles of evolution, heredity, and individual development. Problems of the individual and society raised by present and future genetic knowledge and technology. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. Intended for biology majors. Avian systematics, distribution, evolution, ecology, and behavior, emphasis on migration and orientation, territoriality, communication, and reproductive behavior. Field trips will concentrate on identification, interpretation of behavior, and research methods. (4 credit hours.)
        • Field course taught in a tropical area overseas. Topics center on ecology and evolution and may include plants and animals, their interactions in rain forests, seasonally dry forests and mangroves, cloud forests, marine biology, marine/land interface, coral physiology, and reef development. Requires detailed field journal and other projects on areas visited. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: One introductory biology course. Insects, with emphasis on evolution, distribution, behavior, and structure. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: BIOL-L 111. Ecology, evolution, and phylogeny of major invertebrate groups, with emphasis on current controversies and concepts. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: BIOL-L 111 and junior or senior standing. Morphology, evolution, adaptations, and general biology of vertebrates. (5 credit hours.)
        • P: Junior or senior standing. Introduction to the zoological study of animal behavior. Emphasizes both internal and external factors involved in the causation of species-typical behavior of animals (protozoa-primates) in their natural environment. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: BIOL-L 111; and junior or senior standing. Introduces diversity of extant fishes with respect to evolutionary relationships, classification, structure, function, behavior, ecology and biogeography. (3 credit hours.)
        • Paleontology and sedimentary geology with a regional focus, emphasizing life, the sedimentary record, changing paleo-environments, and the origin of Indiana's modern landscape, faunas and floras, and natural resources. Labs include fossil identification and analyses of paleontological, stratigraphic and sedimentological data. Occasional field trips. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 308 or GEOL-G 308. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: One course from the General Education Natural and Mathematical Sciences course list or one course from the General Education Social and Historical Studies course list. Evolutionary history of reef ecosystems through geologic time inclusive of reef composition and global distribution, modern reef development, conservation and management practices, and the persistence of the reef ecosystem through climate change scenarios. Covers biologic, ecologic, and geologic principles as they pertain to coral reef ecosystems. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 341 or GEOL-G 341. (3 credit hours.)
        • A survey of the present and past distributions of the world's plants and animals, emphasizing ecological explanation of species distributions. Topics include evolution and distribution of major plant and animal groups, world vegetation, plant and animal domestication, introduction of plant and animal pests, destruction of natural communities, and extinction. (3 credit hours.)
        • Explores the environmental impact of global population growth, natural resources utilization, and pollution. Examines current problems relating to energy consumption, farming practices, water use, resource development and deforestation from geologic and ecological perspectives. Strategies designed to avert predicted global catastrophe will be examined to determine success potential. (3 credit hours.)
        • Can humans restore ecosystems and undo the environmental harm they have caused? To what state/extent should ecosystems be restored? What drives the ecological restoration movement? Investigates the deeply interconnected history, philosophy, ecology, geomorphology, and political economy of restoration through readings, discussions, and fieldwork. (3 credit hours.)
        • Introduction to hydrological processes occurring at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Principles of water resources such as infiltration, runoff, surface- and groundwater flow will be explored. Topics covered also include the environmental, economic, and social implications of floods, droughts, dams, and water usage as well as current and future issues in water quality, water pollution, and water–resource regulation. (3 credit hours.)
        • Introduction to global environmental change (GEC), focusing on the human causes and consequences of biophysical transformations of land systems. Emphasis on socioeconomic, political, institutional, and environmental dimensions of land change; tropical forests, grasslands, and urbanizing areas; international environmental regimes; spatial methodologies in GEC research, and integrated approaches. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: GEOG-G 107 or GEOG-G 109. Introduces basic principles and concepts in forest ecohydrology, focusing on modeling perspectives. Examines processes and feedback among water, carbon, and nitrogen fluxes in application to water resources and forest management: control of climate, vegetation change, and disturbance regimes on hydrological and biogeochemical processes. (3 credit hours.)
        • Examines trees and forests as conspicuous natural objects that play a multivalent role in human imagination, thinking, and emotion. Explores the intertwined natural and cultural trajectory of trees in evolutionary, historical, and psychological dimensions. Topics include ecosystem services, human uses and attitudes, deforestation, IU's woodland campus, and ecological ethics. (3 credit hours.)
        • Deep ecology seeks fundamental transformations in views of world and self. It claims that there is no ontological divide in the forms of life and aims for an environmentally sustainable and spiritually rich way of life. This course is an introductory examination of Deep Ecology from a religious studies perspective. Credit given for only one of REL-D 250 or REL-R 236. (3 credit hours.)
        • Exploration of relationships between religious worldviews and environmental ethics. Considers environmental critiques and defenses of monotheistic traditions, selected non-Western traditions, the impact of secular “mythologies,” philosophical questions, and lifestyle issues. Credit given for only one of REL-D 350 or REL-R 371. (3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topic: "The God Species: Ethics in the Anthropocene ") Intensive study of a selected problem in religion and society such as religion and American politics, war and conscience, medical ethics. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • Independent study, readings, research, or practicum in biodiversity and sustainability from any department (3 cr.) with pre-approval of the Program (Note: This option can be used only once.)
    5. Individualized. 12 credit hours selected in consultation with the ESS Academic Advisor and approved by the Director of the program. This option is a way for students to study new and innovative sustainability dimensions that do not fit the existing areas.
  4. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the minor.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the minor—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to minor requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.