Majors, minors + certificates

Minor in Environmental Science (ENVSCIMIN)Integrated Program in the Environment

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Minor requirements

The minor requires at least 15 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introductory Course. One (1) course from the .
    • Just as we shape the environment, the environment shapes us. From globalization to food production to climate change, learn how humans and environments interact. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
  2. Advanced Electives. Three (3) courses from the .
    • P: One introductory biology course. Survey of the ferns, gymnosperms, and flowering plants, including their morphology, classification, ecology, evolution, and economic importance. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. R: Junior or senior standing. Morphology, life histories, classification, genetics, physiology, development, ecology, medical and economic importance of fungi. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: One introductory biology course. For those desiring a broad, practical knowledge of common wild and cultivated plants. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: College chemistry; and BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. The interrelationships among plant function and temperature, water supply, nutrient level, light quality, light quantity, gases, and other organisms. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111. Provides a strong framework and hands-on experience studying biodiversity. Course transitions between introductory materials considered in BIOL-L 111 and BIOL-L 112 and more advanced courses focused on specific groups of organisms (for example, vertebrate zoology). Includes field and lab components where local biodiversity is sampled and analyzed. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Analysis of the mechanisms of inheritance, including developmental processes that lead to the construction of whole organisms and to the transmission to their offspring of specific genetic traits. Includes the principles of genetics and the analysis of mutations affecting development. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-S 311. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Provides a rigorous exploration of the theory of evolution—the conceptual core of biology. Topics include origins and history of life; the interplay of heredity and environment in shaping adaptations; molecular, behavioral, and social evolution; patterns of speciation, extinction, and their consequences; methods for inferring evolutionary relationships among organisms. Credit given for only one of the following: BIOL-L 318, BIOL-L 479, or BIOL-S 318. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211. P or C: BIOL-L 311. Experiments with plants, animals, bacteria, and viruses demonstrating fundamental genetic mechanisms. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 319 or BIOL-S 311. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: 100-level Biology; or consent of instructor. An interdisciplinary, place-based approach to understanding biological diversity and its relationship to flourishing human societies, and to developing associated skills and values (e.g. interdisciplinary thinking and action, stewardship). (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Presents the theoretical framework of disease ecology to address special problems in disease biology, including the evolution of virulence, sexually transmitted diseases, reproduction and mate choice. Examines case studies of common infectious diseases. Combines informal lecture with discussion of key papers in the field. (3 credit hours.)
    • Not open to biology majors. Interactions of human beings with other elements of the biosphere with emphasis on population, community, and ecosystem levels of ecology. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. Intended for biology majors. Avian systematics, distribution, evolution, ecology, and behavior, emphasis on migration and orientation, territoriality, communication, and reproductive behavior. Field trips will concentrate on identification, interpretation of behavior, and research methods. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. R: BIOL-L 473 and an introductory environmental science or ecology course. Explains how ecosystems function and how and why ecosystems differ in their sensitivity to stress, disturbance and global change. Introduces key concepts and approaches used in the field of ecosystem ecology: ecosystem energetics; biogeochemical cycles and budgets; and the response of ecosystems to stress, disturbance and global change. Focuses on patterns and processes in aquatic, terrestrial and wetland ecosystems. (3 credit hours.)
    • Field course taught in a tropical area overseas. Topics center on ecology and evolution and may include plants and animals, their interactions in rain forests, seasonally dry forests and mangroves, cloud forests, marine biology, marine/land interface, coral physiology, and reef development. Requires detailed field journal and other projects on areas visited. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Sophomore standing. We are covered with trillions of microorganisms that influence our health and well being. This course focuses on the diversity of these microorganisms but also those in nature, which together regulate the world we live in. Reading primary literature, class experiments, modeling, and group presentations. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111. R: BIOL-L 318. Major concepts of ecology for science majors; relation of individual organisms to their environment, population ecology, structure and function of ecosystems. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 473 and BIOL-L 479. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111 . R: Previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL-L 473. Introduction to research problems and techniques in the ecology of individuals, populations, and ecosystems. (2–3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. A conventional laboratory of exercises, demonstrations and discussions. The goal is to achieve proficiency in the principles and techniques necessary for the manipulation of microorganisms under aseptic conditions. Credit given for only one of BIOL-M 255 or BIOL-M 315. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-M 250, BIOL-M 255, or BIOL-M 315; or consent of instructor. Scientific inquiry-driven research in environmental microbiology. Focus on the diversity and function of environmental microbes and methods used to study them. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: One introductory biology course. Insects, with emphasis on evolution, distribution, behavior, and structure. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111. Ecology, evolution, and phylogeny of major invertebrate groups, with emphasis on current controversies and concepts. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111 and junior or senior standing. Morphology, evolution, adaptations, and general biology of vertebrates. (5 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111; and junior or senior standing. Introduces diversity of extant fishes with respect to evolutionary relationships, classification, structure, function, behavior, ecology and biogeography. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 341, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 341; and MATH-M 119 or MATH-M 211. Theory and application of analytical techniques, including statistical treatment of data, spectroscopy, separation methods, electroanalytical methods, radioisotopes, and immunological methods. Credit given for only one of CHEM-A 314 or CHEM-C 318. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-A 314; or CHEM-C 317 and CHEM-C 318. Application of analytical techniques and instrumentation to qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis. Theory, instrumentation, and data analysis will be covered. Credit given for only one of CHEM-A 315 or CHEM-A 316. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-A 318; or CHEM-C 317 and CHEM-C 318. P or C: CHEM-A 314. Laboratory experiments involve the application of analytical techniques and instrumentation to chemical analysis of biological samples. Methods include spectroscopy, immunoassays, chromatography, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Credit given for only one of CHEM-A 315 or CHEM-A 316. (2 credit hours.)
    • P or C: CHEM-C 341 or CHEM-S 341; and MATH-M 211 or MATH-M 213. Treatment of analytical data; chemical equilibrium; redox titrations; electrochemical theory; potentiometry; voltammetry; coulometry. (2 credit hours.)
    • P or C: CHEM-C 341 or CHEM-S 341; and MATH-M 211 or MATH-M 213. Ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and luminescence spectrophotometry; flame and electrical discharge techniques; X-ray and mass spectrometric methods; phase equilibria and extractions; counter current distribution; gas, thin-layer liquid, and high-performance liquid chromatography. Credit given for only one of CHEM-A 314; or CHEM-C 317 and CHEM-C 318. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: EAS-E 122, GEOG-G 109, GEOL-G 107, or GEOL-G 122; or consent of instructor. Analysis and interpretation of meteorological data with a focus on forecasting applications for the mid-latitudes. Students learn the practical skills that weather forecasters use. Credit given for only one of EAS-A 339, GEOG-G 339, or GEOL-G 339. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduces the principles of atmospheric measurement including sampling strategies, instrumentation and data analysis to quantify atmospheric variables and processes. Covers standard meteorological techniques: ground-based, satellite and airborne remote sensing; atmospheric chemistry and aerosol measurements. Research projects in experimental design will employ field and laboratory equipment to investigate climatological and meteorological principles. Credit given for only one of EAS-A 347 or GEOL-G 347. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: EAS-A 340, GEOG-G 340, or GEOL-G 340 . The atmospheric-boundary layer is the interface between the free atmosphere and the surface. Basic meteorological theory for processes in the atmospheric boundary-layer that scale from the microscale to the mesoscale. Aerodynamic and energy budget concepts. Development and application of boundary-layer models and associated parameterizations. Lecture and laboratory format. Credit given for only one of EAS-A 364, GEOG-G 362, or GEOL-G 364. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: EAS-A 339, EAS-A 340, GEOG-G 304, GEOG-G 339, GEOL-G 339, or GEOL-G 340; or consent of instructor. Analysis and prediction of synoptic scale weather systems, emphasizing the mid-latitudes. Other topics include severe weather and atmospheric/oceanic teleconnections. Credit given for only one of EAS-A 437, GEOG-G 433, or GEOL-G 437. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: At least two undergraduate physical science courses or consent of instructor. Evidence for and theories of climate change over a range of time scales. Sources of natural climate forcing are presented, historical evolution of climate change is quantified, and model tools and climate projections are presented along with analyses of climate change impacts. Credit given for only one of EAS-A 476, GEOG-G 475, or GEOL-G 476. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: EAS-E 225 or GEOL-G 225. Origin of petroleum, coal, industrial minerals, and ore deposits; reserves, resources, and future needs; history, economic, and environmental considerations; national minerals policy; and international aspects of energy and raw materials distribution. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 316 or GEOL-G 316. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: One of EAS-E 225 or GEOL-G 225; and one of EAS-E 226 or GEOL-G 226. Integrative treatment of sedimentology, stratigraphy, and structural geology. Examines links between tectonic deformation processes and the resulting sediment that forms the stratigraphic rock record. Description of sedimentary rocks, from basic features at the bed-scale to scales of sedimentary basins. Learning and applying the facies concept and using stratigraphic principles to correlate facies across sedimentary basins. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 333, EAS-E 334, GEOL-G 333, or GEOL-G 334. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: EAS-E 222 or GEOL-G 222. Processes and factors influencing genesis of sedimentary particles and their deposition. Interpretation of depositional environments. Sedimentary facies and interpretation of stratigraphic record from outcrop, core sequence, and remote sensing. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 334 or GEOL-G 334. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: One course from the General Education Natural and Mathematical Sciences course list or one course from the General Education Social and Historical Studies course list. Evolutionary history of reef ecosystems through geologic time inclusive of reef composition and global distribution, modern reef development, conservation and management practices, and the persistence of the reef ecosystem through climate change scenarios. Covers biologic, ecologic, and geologic principles as they pertain to coral reef ecosystems. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 341 or GEOL-G 341. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 103, CHEM-C 105, CHEM-C 117, or CHEM-S 117; and PHYS-H 221, PHYS-P 201, or PHYS-P 221. Introduction to hydrology, physical properties of water relating to heat transfer and flow, phases of water and phase changes, water as a solvent and transporting agent, water budgets at various scales of inquiry, fluid pressure and potential, and fluid flow at the surface and subsurface of the earth. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 351 or GEOL-G 351. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 117 or CHEM-S 117. Interactions between geology, chemistry, and biology in natural systems. Explores biogeochemical processes on small scales and in terms of global cycles, as well as human impacts on biogeochemical cycling. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 406 and GEOL-G 406. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: One course from the General Education Natural and Mathematical Sciences course list. Structure, classification, habitats, and geological history and significance of the invertebrate phyla. Laboratory study of fossils. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 411 or GEOL-G 411. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: One course from the General Education Natural and Mathematical Sciences course list. Fossil record, comparative morphology, phylogeny, biogeography, and paleoecology of the major vertebrate groups. Functional modifications of the vertebrate skeleton for existence in various aquatic and terrestrial environments. Laboratory study of recent and fossil osteological specimens. Field trip to a museum with a major vertebrate paleontology collection. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 412 and GEOL-G 412. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: EAS-E 226 or GEOL-G 226; and EAS-E 227 or GEOL-G 227. Geomorphic processes, evolution and classification of landforms. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 415 or GEOL-G 415. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PHYS-H 221 or PHYS-P 221. Fundamentals and application of geophysics to geologic problems; emphasis on geophysical exploration. Occasional laboratory demonstrations or problems and field work. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 423 and GEOL-G 423. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: EAS-E 111 or GEOL-G 111; and one of EAS-E 334, EAS-E 415, GEOL-G 334, or GEOL-G 415; or consent of instructor. The Quaternary Period is examined with a focus upon the last glaciation with specific reference to Northwest Indiana. Topics include glacier processes, glacial sediments, glacial landforms and landform assemblages, specific glacial lake processes, sediments and drainage events, dating methods, soil mechanics and environmental applications. Field trips are mandatory. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 435 or GEOL-G 435. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: One of CHEM-C 103, CHEM-C 105, CHEM-C 117, or CHEM-S 117. An overview of basic collection and preparation of water, soil, and geologic materials for analysis by analytical geochemistry techniques for environmental and exploration geology, and geochemistry applications. Techniques include Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP), Atomic Spectrometry Absorption (AAS) by flame and graphite furnace, X-ray fluorescence, and Leco carbon and sulfur concentration determinations. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 444 or GEOL-G 444. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 117 or CHEM-S 117; and MATH-M 211 or MATH-S 211. Physical and chemical properties of water; chemical equilibria and stable isotopes in groundwaters; acid drainage, landfills, and agricultural pollution; Darcy's Law, fluid potential, unsaturated flow; fluid and aquifer properties affecting groundwater flow; fluid mass-balance equation and its application; contaminant transport. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 451 and GEOL-G 451. (2–4 credit hours.)
    • P: Any EAS-E course at the 300–399 level. Field investigation of selected regions of North America for study of mineralogic, lithologic, stratigraphic, structural, paleontologic, geomorphologic, or other geological relationships. Six to 15 days in the field. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours in EAS-X 420, GEOL-G 420, and GEOL-X 420. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to the physical basis of the climate system from the global to the local scale, emphasizing the surface energy and water balances. Examples are drawn from forested, agricultural, urban, and aquatic environments, as well as issues related to climate change. Develops skills used to study and quantify climate processes. Credit given for only one of GEOG-G 304 or GEOL-G 340. (3 credit hours.)
    • A survey of the present and past distributions of the world's plants and animals, emphasizing ecological explanation of species distributions. Topics include evolution and distribution of major plant and animal groups, world vegetation, plant and animal domestication, introduction of plant and animal pests, destruction of natural communities, and extinction. (3 credit hours.)
    • Principles of remote sensing of the earth and its atmosphere, emphasizing satellite data in visible, infrared, and microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Emphasis on practical applications and digital image analysis. (3 credit hours.)
    • One (1) of the following:
      • Overview of the principles and practices of geographic information systems (GIS). The course will deal with issues of spatial data models, database design, introductory and intermediate GIS operations, and case studies of real-world GIS applications. Laboratory exercises will provide significant hands-on experience. Lecture and laboratory. (3 credit hours.)
      • No description is available for this course.
    • Can humans restore ecosystems and undo the environmental harm they have caused? To what state/extent should ecosystems be restored? What drives the ecological restoration movement? Investigates the deeply interconnected history, philosophy, ecology, geomorphology, and political economy of restoration through readings, discussions, and fieldwork. (3 credit hours.)
    • Use of instrumentation for the measurement, analysis, and interpretation of field data concerning features and processes of the natural environment. Field and laboratory equipment will be used for research projects and environmental monitoring. Practical application of biogeographic, climatological, and hydrological principles. (3 credit hours.)
    • Surveys the relationship between climate and vegetation and explores the consequences of human impacts. Examines the role of climate on vegetation patterns, agricultural crops, and select ecosystems and in turn, the influence of vegetation on climate. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: GEOG-G 336 or consent of instructor. Advanced remote sensing theory and digital image processing techniques with an emphasis on environmental applications. Hands-on computer exercises provide significant experience in introductory digital image processing for extraction of qualitative and quantitative information about the Earth’s terrestrial environments. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: GEOG-G 338 or consent of instructor. Intermediate and advanced topics in geographic information science and spatial analysis techniques using GIS software. This advanced course is for upper-division undergraduates and graduates who seek a greater understanding of this rapidly developing field and to learn how to construct, manage, and analyze their own GIS data and models. (3 credit hours.)
    • Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are causing climate to change at an unprecedented rate. This course will explain how and why anthropogenic activity is causing climate to change, how this impacts society and options for adaptation and mitigation, plus the potential to reduce climate change through geoengineering. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to hydrological processes occurring at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Principles of water resources such as infiltration, runoff, surface- and groundwater flow will be explored. Topics covered also include the environmental, economic, and social implications of floods, droughts, dams, and water usage as well as current and future issues in water quality, water pollution, and water–resource regulation. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines the science of dendrochronology. Developing a scientific understanding of the information recorded by trees is essential to our quest to better understand natural and human processes. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: 6 credit hours of geography or consent of instructor. Extension of traditional statistical analysis to spatial data. Spatial means and spatial variances, the examination of differences in samples over space, spatial autocorrelation, nearest neighbor analysis, map comparison techniques. Emphasis is on practical applications. (3 credit hours.)
    • Students use Python to perform advanced geospatial data analyses and data visualization with large spatiotemporal datasets (e.g. modeling, remote sensing or GIS data). Includes an introduction to the Python programming language and the basics of scientific computing. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PHYS-H 221, PHYS-P 201, or PHYS-P 221; MATH-M 211; or consent of instructor. For biological and physical science majors. Relationship of physics to current environmental problems. Energy production, comparison of sources and byproducts; nature of and possible solutions to problems of noise, particulate matter in atmosphere. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PHYS-H 222, PHYS-P 202, of PHYS-P 222; MATH-M 120 or MATH-M 211. . Introduction to quantitative methods for life sciences, emphasizing how living systems process information. Topics include noise in sensory signals; consequences for sensory processing; uncertainty and decision making; neural networks, excitable waves in neurons and muscle; stability/instability; models of development and morphogenesis. Open to students in the physical or life sciences. (3 credit hours.)
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    • SPEA-E 355
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    • (approved topics: "Plants and Plant Communities"; "Radiological Hazard Management ") No description is available for this course.
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  3. Additional Elective. One (1) course from the .
    • Additional course from the Advanced Electives list above
    • P: BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112; and CHEM-C 117. Structure and function of DNA and RNA. DNA replication, mechanisms of mutation, repair, recombination, and transposition. Mechanisms and regulation of gene expression. The genetic code, transcription, and translation. Introduces bacteriophages, plasmids, and the technology of recombinant DNA. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: One semester of college chemistry. R: BIOL-L 211. Does not count as an upper-level lecture in the Biology B.A. major or Biology B.S. degree. Application of fundamental principles to the study of microorganisms. Significance of microorganisms to humans and their environment. (3 credit hours.)
    • This course sequentially considers minerals, rocks, sediments, and soils; the materials that comprise the solid earth. The distribution and environmental significance of these materials are studied, as are their chemical and physical interactions with groundwater and plants. Three 50-minute lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week. Laboratory attendance is required. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 221, EAS-E 225, GEOL-G 221, or GEOL-G 225 . (4 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to the processes that shape our planet, the composition and structure of Earth, and the erosion and deposition of sediments at the surface. Study of processes ranging from forces driving plate motion, fluid flow in and on the earth, crustal deformation and mountain building, erosion of source terrain, the transport system, and the depositional record. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 226 or GEOL-G 226. (3 credit hours.)
    • Earth's climate is linked to geological processes and life on our planet. Covers climate systems in the context of changes in continents, atmospheric composition, and life on land and in the oceans. Focuses on interactions between humans and climate and how climate and its variability are tied to Earth systems. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 227 or GEOL-G 227. (3 credit hours.)
    • SPEA-E 260
  4. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the minor.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the minor—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to minor requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.