Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Arts in Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ENVSUSTBA)Integrated Program in the Environment

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Bachelor of Arts in Environmental and Sustainability Studies is an interdisciplinary, liberal‐arts degree designed to provide an introduction to the complex system‐scale challenges of sustainability as well as the tools needed to address problems that transcend solely social or environmental domains. Students pursuing this degree can expect to integrate experience in the humanities with the natural and social sciences. The major offers the opportunity to develop skills in communication and creative expression, data collection and analysis, environmental science, and economics. Although this is designed as a stand‐alone major, students are encouraged to pursue this degree program as a second major opportunity. Pursuing two majors enables students a combination of depth in a core discipline and breadth across the range of topics that are inherent in environmental and sustainability studies. Potential career areas include environmental planning and coordination, environmental education and communications, sustainability coordination or consulting in the private or public sector, green design, environmental law or public affairs, or further academic pursuits with graduate study.

The degree is co-awarded by the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. College of Arts and Sciences policies are enforced.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 30 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introduction to Sustainability Studies. One (1) course from the .
    • How do humans relate to the environment? Addresses this question from cross-cultural, historical, scientific, and ethical perspectives. Considers current problems; examines how technical, socioeconomic and political changes transform people's use of natural resources. Students evaluate how societies vary in perceptions of nature and explore implications for behavior, decision making, and environmental change. (3 credit hours.)
    • How has the global environment changed? How are we influencing Earth's natural processes, now and in the future? Learn about climate change, resource consumption, and land use change. (3 credit hours.)
    • Just as we shape the environment, the environment shapes us. From globalization to food production to climate change, learn how humans and environments interact. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
  2. Human-Environment Systems. One (1) course from the .
    • When we think of nature, what images come to mind? How are ideas of nature influenced by culture, history, and politics? By the end of the semester, students will recognize how environments represent a collection, not only of plants and animals, but also of meanings and relationships. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines processes of globalization and economic and cultural integration, including the origin and spread of mass-consumer society. Topics include the theories of consumption, mass media and advertising, and the relationship between modernity and consumerism. Examples from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the United States are included. (3 credit hours.)
    • Seminar course that explores major theories and approaches to conservation, from "fortress conservation" to community-based and participatory strategies. Considers the implications of protected areas for local human populations and cultural diversity. Evaluates outcomes and unintended consequences of protected areas, and controversies over the "best" way to protect natural resources. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Pleasure, Pain, and Peak Oil ") Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 103 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the arts and humanities Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 103 or COLL-S 103. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Language Hotspots and Biodiversity ") Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 104 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the social and historical studies Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 104 or COLL-S 104. (3 credit hours.)
    • Explores the stories that people tell about the relations between humans and the natural world and the ways that natural disasters operate as both reality and idea. Considers issues drawn from world historical cases and how environmental history and catastrophes transcend political boundaries. (3 credit hours.)
    • Explores the environmental impact of global population growth, natural resources utilization, and pollution. Examines current problems relating to energy consumption, farming practices, water use, resource development and deforestation from geologic and ecological perspectives. Strategies designed to avert predicted global catastrophe will be examined to determine success potential. (3 credit hours.)
    • Can humans restore ecosystems and undo the environmental harm they have caused? To what state/extent should ecosystems be restored? What drives the ecological restoration movement? Investigates the deeply interconnected history, philosophy, ecology, geomorphology, and political economy of restoration through readings, discussions, and fieldwork. (3 credit hours.)
    • Reviews social science theoretical frameworks to explain environmental behavior and decisions, and implications for effective environmental management policies and methodologies. Topics include global changes in land/climate systems; sustainable development; property regimes; vulnerability and adaptation; integrative-interdisciplinary methods for environmental management; equity and participatory decision-making, etc. (3 credit hours.)
    • Presents the fundamentals of specialty crop and animal sustainable agriculture based on an agro-ecological framework. Study and application of ecological, social, and economic concepts in evaluating for farm sustainability. Includes both in-class and field lab experiences. (3 credit hours.)
    • An examination of the notion of sustainable development and its meaning as well as the manner in which it has been implemented in the areas of resources, agriculture, water, transport, cities, and tourism. How such systems can be implemented in developing and developed countries will also be examined. (3 credit hours.)
    • Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are causing climate to change at an unprecedented rate. This course will explain how and why anthropogenic activity is causing climate to change, how this impacts society and options for adaptation and mitigation, plus the potential to reduce climate change through geoengineering. (3 credit hours.)
    • How has nature been appropriated, reworked, and produced under capitalism; conversely, how does the materiality of nature shape the conditions of capitalism? In this seminar, we will investigate how relations between capitalism and nature have evolved from the end of feudalism through the current neoliberal era. (3 credit hours.)
    • An introduction to political ecology, an approach which focuses on the political-economic context of natural resource conflicts with particular attention to issues of equity, justice, and power. Covers the theoretical lineage of political ecology, its development over the last twenty years, and current hot topics in the field. (3 credit hours.)
    • Do we control water, or does it control us? Introduces geographic perspectives on the interaction of water and society. Takes the holistic view and asks the big questions about how water shapes, and is shaped by, social, political, and cultural dynamics. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to food production and consumption systems, emphasizing linkages to land use and social change on food/farming system sustainability. Topics include urbanization, population growth, and economic liberalization; farming livelihoods, gender, and poverty; biotechnology; agro-ecology, global health. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Arctic Encounters: Animals, People and Ships ") Advanced topics examining pressing health and environmental challenges around the world. Focuses on the interaction of health and environmental problems that cross national borders and require a multinational or global effort to solve. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics: "Nature and the City"; "Negotiating Climate: Culture, Science, Politics ") Interdisciplinary study of comparative environmental issues around the world. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines the processes of social decision reconciling human demands on the natural world with the ability of nature to sustain life and living standards. Analyzes the implications for public policies in complex sequential interactions among technical, economic, social, and political systems and considers the consequences of alternative courses of action. (3 credit hours.)
    • Online course that examines topics related to green building design and technologies, including sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy efficiency, materials and resources, indoor environmental quality, and LEED Exam preparation. Credit given for only one of AMID-D 203 or SOAD-D 203. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topic: "Food systems and community resilience ") No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topic: "Environmental Law, Justice and Politics ") No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
  3. Communication and Creative Expression. One (1) course from the .
    • Taking IUB as a case study, this course examines architecture as an expression of educational ideals. People design buildings and shape the landscape in order to achieve specific ends; with that in mind, we will try to sort out how the physical fabric of this institution expresses certain cultural, political, and social ideals. Comparing the infrastructure of this campus with other examples, we will try to shed light on what your families hope you've been doing, what you think you've been doing, and what the state expects you to do in the future. Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 290 or FINA-A 290. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111 or BIOL-L 112. Development of scientific writing styles and techniques to help students learn about complex phenomena, sharpen thought processes used in evaluating complicated data, and develop skills essential for communicating intricate ideas and concepts. Research reports will be regularly reviewed by the instructor, and in the context of cooperative learning groups. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • 'Sustainability' is the capacity to negotiate environmental, social, and economic needs and desires for current and future generations. Traces historical and global discourses of sustainability; defines key terms and frames sustainability; engages related concepts of democracy, citizenship, and community; and develops critical thinking, research, and communication skills. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 212 or ENG-R 212. (3 credit hours.)
    • This class is grounded in the perspective that symbolic and natural systems are mutually constituted and therefore, the ways we communicate about and with the environment are vital to examine for a sustainable and just future. The focus of the class may vary to engage topics such as environmental tourism or environmental disasters. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 348 or ENG-R 348. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Submission of acceptable manuscript to instructor in advance of registration. R: ENG-W 103 or ENG-W 203. Writing workshop in such modes as personal essay, autobiography, and documentary. May be repeated once for credit. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ENG-W 231 or consent of the instructor. Offers instruction in preparing technical proposals and reports, with an introduction to the use of graphics. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Completion of the English composition requirement. Advanced writing course focuses on the interconnected activities of writing and reading, especially the kinds of responding, analyzing, and evaluating that characterize work in many fields in the university. Topics vary from semester to semester. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Music and disaster") Basic theoretical approaches to the study of folklore, emphasizing the relationship to other social science disciplines such as semiotics and anthropology. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Folklore and the Environment") Studies of folk culture in relationship to other fields. Focuses on such interdisciplinary topics as folk culture in relationship to language, literature, psychology, history, religion, sociology, musicology, or anthropology. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • The outcome of scientific research informs and shapes our society and culture at all levels. This course explores how science engages with the public, how the public engages with science, and how the relation between science and the public has changed over time. (3 credit hours.)
    • Theories of visual communication including human perception, psychology of color, and principles of design. Application of those theories to photography, video, and computer graphic design in news communication. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 210 or MSCH-C 226. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Web Design") Topical course dealing with changing subjects and material from term to term. May be repeated for credit with different topics in JOUR-J 360 and MSCH-J 360. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Science in the Public Sphere") P: Junior or senior standing. Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and materials from term to term. May be repeated for credit with different topics in JOUR-J 460 and MSCH-J 460. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; and in MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283; and consent of instructor. Lab fee required. Intermediate, hands-on production course that covers acquisition and post-production, including composition, continuity, sound, lighting and digital editing. Provides practical experience in the planning, shooting, and editing of video programs using both Avid and Final Cut Pro software. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 351 or TEL-T 351. (3 credit hours.)
    • Focuses on developing and producing a larger scale documentary, including research, story development, writing, filming and editing. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 435 or MSCH-P 435. (4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Communicating Climate Change") P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 213 or TEL-T 205; or consent of instructor. Exploration of social problems and issues. Topics vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours in MSCH-S 451 and TEL-T 451. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
  4. Data Collection and Analysis. One (1) course from the .
    • Qualitative Methods
    • Students learn the approaches and methods of ethnography by conducting their own hands-on field research projects in and around the community. Students complete a series of ethnographic lab assignments on participant observation, mapping and visual technologies, interviewing, and writing up research findings. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines the ways ethnographic work can provide a critical lens through which to view our world. By juxtaposing familiar cultural practices and beliefs against those of other societies and cultures, students learn to critically assess aspects of their own society they may have previously taken for granted. Provides training in ethnographic methods and features a semester-long ethnographic project. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in ANTH-E 431 or CMCL-C 318. (3 credit hours.)
    • Ethnography is the defining core of social and cultural anthropology; field research is at the heart of ethnography. The definition and purpose of ethnography, the role of ethnographer, voice, ethics, and modes of presentation, standards, craft, art, and evaluation are examined through specific cases and exemplary ethnographies. (3 credit hours.)
    • Focuses on and provides practice in the various qualitative methods employed by geographers to solve problems within the geographic landscape. Each methodology is practiced in the field or within the laboratory so that students develop competency using these methods and can then apply them to a research project. (3 credit hours.)
    • Geospatial Data Analysis
    • Mapping lets us visualize our world and see how patterns change across places. For example, we can analyze how a bike-share program changes commuting patterns, or how urban farming emerges in a transforming city. Students learn how to develop digital maps and interpret spatial processes while gaining valuable experience with GIS software. (3 credit hours.)
    • Principles of remote sensing of the earth and its atmosphere, emphasizing satellite data in visible, infrared, and microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Emphasis on practical applications and digital image analysis. (3 credit hours.)
    • Overview of the principles and practices of geographic information systems (GIS). The course will deal with issues of spatial data models, database design, introductory and intermediate GIS operations, and case studies of real-world GIS applications. Laboratory exercises will provide significant hands-on experience. Lecture and laboratory. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • Statistical and Computational Techniques
    • Fundamentals of univariate and bivariate statistics, construction and interpretation of graphs, and computer-assisted data analysis. Both statistical methodology and theory will be emphasized as well as computer literacy. Students will examine the primary literature in all branches of anthropology to familiarize themselves with the role of statistics in anthropological research. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370, ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300, MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300, PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: MATH-M 014. CJUS-K 300 covers the properties of single variables, the measurement of association between pairs of variables, and statistical inference. Additional topics, such as the analyses of qualitative and aggregated data, address specific criminal justice concerns. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370, ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300, MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300, PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: MATH-M 211 or MATH-S 211. Introduction to processing, visualizing, and interpreting data using scientific computing techniques used in Earth science fields. Includes univariate and multivariate statistics, time-series analysis, signal processing and filtering, spatial data analysis, and computational methods such as regression, Taylor series truncation, accumulating error, interpolation, differentiation, and integration. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 314 or GEOL-G 314. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ECON-E 201 and MATH-M 118 or similar course emphasizing probability concepts. R: ECON-E 202 and MATH-M 119. Lectures emphasize the use of basic probability concepts and statistical theory in the estimation and testing of single parameter and multivariate relationships. In computer labs, using Microsoft Excel, each student calculates descriptive statistics, probabilities, and least squares regression coefficients in situations based on current business and economic events. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370; ANTH-A 306; CJUS-K 300; MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310; POLS-Y 395; PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310; SOC-S 371; STAT-K 310 or STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303; or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ECON-E 201 and MATH-M 118 or similar course emphasizing probability concepts; Honors student. R: MATH-M 119 and ECON-E 202. Honors course. Designed for students of superior ability. Covers same core material as ECON-E 370 and substitutes for ECON-E 370 as a prerequisite for other courses. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370; ANTH-A 306; CJUS-K 300; MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310; POLS-Y 395; PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310; SOC-S 371; STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303; or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
    • A first course in scientific computing that emphasizes practical applications in the geospatial and environmental sciences. Requires high-level programming using MATLAB for visualization, data analysis, and modeling. Teaches problem solving through analysis and interpretation of a wide range of environmental and geographic data. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: 6 credit hours of geography or consent of instructor. Extension of traditional statistical analysis to spatial data. Spatial means and spatial variances, the examination of differences in samples over space, spatial autocorrelation, nearest neighbor analysis, map comparison techniques. Emphasis is on practical applications. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to methods and statistics used in political inquiry, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, sampling, statistical inference and hypothesis testing, measures of association, analysis of variance, and regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: One of MATH-M 106, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-M 212, MATH-V 118, or, MATH-V 119. Introduction to statistics; nature of statistical data; ordering and manipulation of data; measures of central tendency and dispersion; elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: One of MATH-M 106, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-M 212, MATH-V 118, or, MATH-V 119. Introduction to probability and statistics; elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Covers concepts of statistical inference and decision; estimation and hypothesis testing; Bayesian inference; and statistical decision theory. Special topics include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: MATH-M 014 or equivalent. R: 3 credit hour mathematics course approved for College of Arts and Sciences mathematics requirement. Introduces the logic of statistical inference. Students will learn how to use sample data to reach conclusions about a population of interest by calculating confidence intervals and significance tests. Estimating the effects of multiple independent variables using cross-tabulations and/or regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, STAT-K 310 or STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301, SOC-S 371, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • P: MATH-M 014 or equivalent. Lecture and laboratory. Introduction to methods for analyzing quantitative data. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models of data, inference about populations from random samples. Regression and analysis of variance. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: MATH-M 119 or equivalent. Introduction to probability and statistics. Elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation, hypothesis testing, Bayesian inference, statistical decision theory. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Math-M 118 or equivalent. Introduction to methods for analyzing data arising in business, designed to prepare business students for the Kelley School’s Integrative Core. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models, fundamental principles of estimation and hypothesis testing, applications to linear regression and quality control. Microsoft Excel used to perform analyses. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: MATH-M 014. Introduction to methods for analyzing data arising in the life sciences, designed for biology, human biology, and pre-medical students. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models, fundamental principles of estimation and hypothesis testing, inferences about means, correlation, linear regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • Field Methods
    • Archaeological work directed toward field techniques: excavation and preservation of materials, surveying, photography, and cataloging. 1 credit hour per full week of fieldwork. Credit given for only one of ANTH-P 405 or ANTH-X 480. (1–8 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111. Provides a strong framework and hands-on experience studying biodiversity. Course transitions between introductory materials considered in BIOL-L 111 and BIOL-L 112 and more advanced courses focused on specific groups of organisms (for example, vertebrate zoology). Includes field and lab components where local biodiversity is sampled and analyzed. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111 . R: Previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL-L 473. Introduction to research problems and techniques in the ecology of individuals, populations, and ecosystems. (2–3 credit hours.)
    • Use of instrumentation for the measurement, analysis, and interpretation of field data concerning features and processes of the natural environment. Field and laboratory equipment will be used for research projects and environmental monitoring. Practical application of biogeographic, climatological, and hydrological principles. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Minimum 3.000 GPA and at least one course in geology, anthropology, physical geography, or related field of study. Interdisciplinary field course in geo-paleoanthropology in the Olduvai Gorge. Develops skills in the application of innovative theory and techniques in human evolutionary research. Promotes understanding of evolutionary processes, such as tectonics and climate episodes, and how these processes influence the development of savanna environments in the East African Rift Valley. Credit given for only one of EAS-X 377, GEOL-G 349, or GEOL-X 377. (6 credit hours.)
    • P: At least 22 credit hours of coursework in earth science or consent of instructor. Surface and near-surface environmental processes are examined within the geologic setting of the IU Judson Mead Geologic Field Station. Components of the Willow Creek Demonstration Watershed are studied within the same general field areas to illustrate their interconnectedness. Includes trips in and around Yellowstone National Park and Butte, Montana. Credit given for only one of EAS-X 479, GEOL-G 433, or GEOL-X 479. (6 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topic: "Plants and Plant Communities ") No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
  5. Environmental Science. One (1) course from the .
    • Not open to biology majors. Interactions of human beings with other elements of the biosphere with emphasis on population, community, and ecosystem levels of ecology. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Records of Global Climate Change") Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 105 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the natural and mathematical sciences Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 105 or COLL-S 105. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to planet Earth as a dynamic and complex global system. Course materials will demonstrate physical and chemical linkages between biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere that directly impact lifestyles of human populations at time scales of years to centuries. Lecture and lab. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 105 or GEOL-G 105. (3 credit hours.)
    • A dependable supply of water is critical to sustaining life but this resource is increasingly at risk because of growing competition among domestic, industrial-commercial, agricultural, and environmental needs. Students will become conversant on the topic of water resources as well as develop an understanding of the key concepts in sustainability and systems thinking. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 118 or GEOL-G 118. (3 credit hours.)
    • Explore Earth's dynamic weather and climate and the driving forces behind them. Students will gain an understanding of various atmospheric phenomena. Why is it hot one day and cold the next? What causes Earth's climate to change? Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 122, GEOG-G 109, or GEOL-G 122. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to oceanography, with emphasis on ocean-atmospheric interaction and global climate, plate tectonics and morphology of the ocean basins, marine geology, energy resources, environmental problems due to sea-level rise, coastal erosion, oil spills, and life in the sea. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 131 or GEOL-G 131. (3 credit hours.)
    • Exploration and examination of such natural and human-induced geologic hazards as earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, coastal erosion and subsidence. Study of the management and disposal of solid, chemical waste including acid-mine drainage and its environmental impact on resources in today's world. Credit only given for only one of EAS-E 171 or GEOL-G 171. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to the processes that shape our planet, the composition and structure of Earth, and the erosion and deposition of sediments at the surface. Study of processes ranging from forces driving plate motion, fluid flow in and on the earth, crustal deformation and mountain building, erosion of source terrain, the transport system, and the depositional record. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 226 or GEOL-G 226. (3 credit hours.)
    • Earth's climate is linked to geological processes and life on our planet. Covers climate systems in the context of changes in continents, atmospheric composition, and life on land and in the oceans. Focuses on interactions between humans and climate and how climate and its variability are tied to Earth systems. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 227 or GEOL-G 227. (3 credit hours.)
    • Explores the physical processes of the Earth—its weather, climate, landforms, oceans and ecosystems—and analyzes a range of environmental issues. (3 credit hours.)
    • What causes tornadoes, hurricanes, and other extreme weather? What is climate change and why is it occurring? Learn about weather, climate, and how they interact. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 122, GEOG-G 109, or GEOL-G 122. (3 credit hours.)
    • A survey of the present and past distributions of the world's plants and animals, emphasizing ecological explanation of species distributions. Topics include evolution and distribution of major plant and animal groups, world vegetation, plant and animal domestication, introduction of plant and animal pests, destruction of natural communities, and extinction. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
  6. Economics. One (1) course from the .
    • (approved topic: "Sustainable Agriculture and Trade") Selected topics in anthropological methods, techniques, and area or thematic studies. Course content will draw on the fieldwork experiences and/or current research of the instructor(s). May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • Scarcity, opportunity cost, competitive and non-competitive market pricing, and interdependence as an analytical core. Individual sections apply this core to a variety of current economic policy problems, such as poverty, pollution, excise taxes, rent controls, and farm subsidies. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201; MATH-M 119 or equivalent, or higher level calculus course. The economics of consumer choice. The economics of production, cost minimization, and profit maximization for business firms in the short run and long run under various market structures. Competition and adjustment to market equilibrium. Introduction to game theory, strategic interaction, and noncooperative equilibria. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 321 or ECON-S 321. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ECON-E 321. Basic theory of common property resources applied to environment and resource conservation problems. Topics include economic efficiency, equity, measurement problems, and policy formulation. (3 credit hours.)
    • How has nature been appropriated, reworked, and produced under capitalism; conversely, how does the materiality of nature shape the conditions of capitalism? In this seminar, we will investigate how relations between capitalism and nature have evolved from the end of feudalism through the current neoliberal era. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "International energy markets: Environmental, Economic and Health Aspects") This course focuses on the intensive study and analysis of selected international problems and issues within an interdisciplinary format. Topics will vary but will cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
  7. Concentration. One (1) of the following:
    1. One (1) of the concentrations listed below.
    2. 12 credit hours selected in consultation with the ESS Academic Advisor and approved by the Director of the program. This option is a way for students to study new and innovative sustainability dimensions that do not fit the existing concentration areas.
  8. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Arts requirements

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines. No more than 42 of these credit hours can come from the major.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 42 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.