Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Arts in International Studies (INTLBA1)Department of International Studies

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Bachelor of Arts in International Studies provides an intellectual foundation that enables students to communicate, collaborate, and work across national, cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic boundaries. By incorporating extensive foreign language study and mandating an overseas experience, the major fosters competencies that students need in order to function successfully in a global environment. Flexible major requirements encourage depth and breadth of thematic and regional knowledge.

Students explore the major by taking two introductory courses chosen from the following thematic areas: Global Health and Environment; Global Development; Human Rights and International Law; Culture and Politics; Peace and Conflict; and Diplomacy, Security, Governance. They can then bring focus to their major studies by completing advanced electives related to the thematic area(s) that most closely aligns with their own interests. Students are also required to complete a minor.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 35 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introduction to International Studies.
    1. Core Courses. Two (2) courses from the .
      • Examination of pressing health and environmental challenges around the world, such as deforestation, climate change and the spread of infectious diseases. Focuses on the interaction of health and environmental problems that cross national borders and require a multinational or global effort to solve. (3 credit hours.)
      • Focuses on the interaction between social, political, and economic forces and human development at global, national, and subnational scales; introduces theoretical perspectives on economic development and the function of markets. (3 credit hours.)
      • Focuses on human rights discourse and the role international law, treaties and conventions play in addressing these rights globally. Course is interdisciplinary in theory and method. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines culture and governance on an international scale, considering how governments, markets, and international organizations deploy or use culture, and how people turn to cultural resources to resist attempts to govern them and/or to assert their own political aims. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines concepts of nationalism and state ideology that shape the world's collective identities and contribute to conflicts nationally and internationally. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the development of the modern state and the role of international organizations in maintaining global security and promoting global governance. Addresses issues of political and cultural diplomacy and their effect in international disputes. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Introductory Elective. One (1) course from the .
      • Any INTL course at the 100–299 level
  2. Research Design. One (1) course from the .
    • P: International Studies major or minor; and at least sophomore standing. Completion before the major's overseas/international experience is strongly recommended. This course is required for all International Studies majors.. Introduction to research design and methodology used in international studies in preparation for undertaking research abroad and completing the INTL-I 400/INTL-I 406 Capstone Seminar. (3 credit hours.)
  3. Advanced Electives. Four (4) courses from the .
    • This course focuses on the intensive study and analysis of selected international problems and issues within an interdisciplinary format. Topics will vary but will cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Advanced topics examining pressing health and environmental challenges around the world. Focuses on the interaction of health and environmental problems that cross national borders and require a multinational or global effort to solve. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Advanced topics examining the interaction between social, political, and economic forces and human development at global, national, and subnational scales; in-depth analysis of theoretical perspectives on economic development and the function of markets. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Advanced topics focusing on human rights discourse and the role international law, treaties and conventions play in addressing these rights globally. Topics are interdisciplinary in theory and method. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Advanced topics in the study of culture and governance. The focus is on relationships of power and authority, including how governments, markets, and international organizations deploy or use culture, and how people turn to cultural resources to resist attempts to govern them and/or to assert their own political aims. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Advanced topics examining concepts of nationalism and state ideology that shape the world's collective identities and contribute to conflicts nationally and internationally. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Advanced topics focusing on the development of the modern state and the role of international organizations in maintaining global security and promoting global governance. Addresses issues of political and cultural diplomacy and their effect in international disputes. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines issues of international scope through service learning projects. Content varies with instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in INTL-I 435 and INTL-X 370. (3 credit hours.)
    • Interdisciplinary study of comparative environmental issues around the world. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of human rights through the arts. Exploration of artistic expressions in various sociopolitical contexts and the global trends from which they emerge. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of nationalism to explore how history, politics and culture conflict and converge in shaping multiple identities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of emergence and use of postcolonial and postcommunist theories to analyze colonial and communist discourses as well as their political and cultural legacies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Exploration of war and peace with regard to their political, moral and legal consequences. Study of structures that adjudicate disputes and the role of international organizations in regulating war and initiating peace. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examination of gender issues from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • In-depth study and analysis of an international problem, culminating in a research project. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Interdisciplinary study of issues of global development and political economy. Includes both analytical and methodological approaches. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Interdisciplinary study of comparative environmental justice issues around the world. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of global health policies and their relationships to social movements. Focuses on the effect of global governance institutions and NGOs on global health policy and action. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study and analysis of conflicts and conflict resolution around the world through selected case studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 3 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    1. 400 Level Course. One (1) course from the .
      • Interdisciplinary study of comparative environmental issues around the world. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study of human rights through the arts. Exploration of artistic expressions in various sociopolitical contexts and the global trends from which they emerge. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study of nationalism to explore how history, politics and culture conflict and converge in shaping multiple identities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study of emergence and use of postcolonial and postcommunist theories to analyze colonial and communist discourses as well as their political and cultural legacies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Exploration of war and peace with regard to their political, moral and legal consequences. Study of structures that adjudicate disputes and the role of international organizations in regulating war and initiating peace. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examination of gender issues from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • In-depth study and analysis of an international problem, culminating in a research project. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Interdisciplinary study of issues of global development and political economy. Includes both analytical and methodological approaches. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Interdisciplinary study of comparative environmental justice issues around the world. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study of global health policies and their relationships to social movements. Focuses on the effect of global governance institutions and NGOs on global health policy and action. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of conflicts and conflict resolution around the world through selected case studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 3 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    2. 300–499 Level Courses. Three (3) courses from the .
      • Additional course from the 400-level Course list above
      • This course focuses on the intensive study and analysis of selected international problems and issues within an interdisciplinary format. Topics will vary but will cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • Advanced topics examining pressing health and environmental challenges around the world. Focuses on the interaction of health and environmental problems that cross national borders and require a multinational or global effort to solve. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Advanced topics examining the interaction between social, political, and economic forces and human development at global, national, and subnational scales; in-depth analysis of theoretical perspectives on economic development and the function of markets. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Advanced topics focusing on human rights discourse and the role international law, treaties and conventions play in addressing these rights globally. Topics are interdisciplinary in theory and method. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Advanced topics in the study of culture and governance. The focus is on relationships of power and authority, including how governments, markets, and international organizations deploy or use culture, and how people turn to cultural resources to resist attempts to govern them and/or to assert their own political aims. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Advanced topics examining concepts of nationalism and state ideology that shape the world's collective identities and contribute to conflicts nationally and internationally. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Advanced topics focusing on the development of the modern state and the role of international organizations in maintaining global security and promoting global governance. Addresses issues of political and cultural diplomacy and their effect in international disputes. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines issues of international scope through service learning projects. Content varies with instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in INTL-I 435 and INTL-X 370. (3 credit hours.)
  4. Capstone. One (1) course from the .
    • P: INTL-I 315; International Studies major; and at least sophomore standing. This required seminar is designed for senior majors who have completed all of the International Studies degree requirements to consolidate their studies. Students complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to their concentration. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: INTL-I 315; International Studies major; departmental honors student; and senior standing. Required for departmental honors credit, this seminar is designed to consolidate the studies of honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. Students must complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to their concentration. (3 credit hours.)
  5. Career Preparation. One (1) course from the .
    • Explores the relationship between academic and extracurricular choices and life after graduation. Students assess their skills, develop a portfolio to highlight them, and create a plan to address gaps. Focuses on a paradigm of job searching that emphasizes research and highly customized, focused application materials. Credit given for only one of the following: ASCS-Q 296, BUS-T 275, or SPEA-V 252. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: Sophomore, junior, or senior standing. R: ASCS-Q 294. Requires special fee. Emphasis on identifying each individual's marketable skills, finding jobs and internships, writing resumes and correspondence, interviewing for positions, and identifying and applying to graduate programs that match each individual's interests and career goals. Stresses the value of the arts and sciences degree in the competitive labor market and graduate application process. Ordinarily taught as an eight-week course. S/F grading. Credit given for only one of the following: ASCS-Q 299, BUS-X 420, SPEA-H 267, SPEA-V 252, or SPEA-V 352. (2 credit hours.)
  6. Foreign Language*. One (1) of the following:
    • Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the third year of college-level coursework (6 semesters)
    • Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework and another foreign language through the second semester of the first year (4 + 2 semesters)
    • Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework (4 semesters) and the first semester of a second foreign language and the first semester of a third foreign language (4 + 1 + 1 semesters)
  7. Electives. Additional INTL courses, as needed to complete all major requirements.
  8. Additional Requirements**.
    1. International Experience. Overseas experience (study or internship) of at least 6 weeks duration, approved in advance by the Department of International Studies.
    2. Minor. Complete a minor related to international studies approved in advance by the Department of International Studies.
  9. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Notes

  • * Non-native speakers of English may petition the Department of International Studies for exemption from third-year language study. Students eligible for a waiver may need to take additional credit hours in International Studies courses.
  • ** These requirements do not count toward the Major GPA or Major Hours.

Bachelor of Arts requirements

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines. No more than 42 of these credit hours can come from the major.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 42 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.