Majors, minors + certificates

Concentration in News Reporting and Editing (Bachelor of Arts in Journalism) (JORC08)The Media School

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The News Reporting and Editing concentration of the B.A.J. combines foundational journalism courses with courses focused on various forms of reporting and editing that use writing, photography, video recording, audio recording and graphic design to present truthful and reliable messages to a wide range of audience types. The three-course specializations in Audio Journalism, Broadcast Journalism, Digital Journalism, Graphic Communication, News Writing, Photojournalism, and Video Journalism will provide news students with the opportunity to develop, practice, and master high-level reporting and editing skills within a context of journalism theory and ethics. The concentration prepares them for careers with news organizations employing a wide spectrum of media technologies.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 36 credit hours* (plus a second concentration of at least 24 credit hours), including the requirements listed below.

  1. Media School Core. Each of the following:
    1. Introduction to Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Examines the role media play in our lives-at work, at school, among family members, friends, and lovers-and analyzes pressing issues in media and society today, such as privacy, globalization, and convergence. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Must be an Ernie Pyle Scholar or Media Scholar. Examines the role media play in our lives-at work, at school, among family members, friends, and lovers-and analyzes pressing issues in media and society today, such as privacy, globalization, and convergence. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Managing Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Examines what games are and how they are made. Topics include the games industry: its creative dimensions and economic structures; its history and future; the organization of game development teams; the methods and tools used in game production. Students will gain a deeper and more detailed appreciation for this rapidly evolving, fascinating, and sometimes baffling industry. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 200 or TEL-T 260. (3 credit hours.)
      • Pulitzer-winning reporters and other award-winning journalists visit the class to share behind-the-scene details of their projects, their ethical choices and the doubts and challenges they faced along the way. The class explores how journalistic prizes are selected and how they shape the future, not just of journalism, but of democracy. (3 credit hours.)
      • The goal of the course is for students to understand and articulate the issues in global journalism and the role of the media as a participant in shaping societies. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 206 or MSCH-C 206. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introductory analysis, using a case-study method, of how media industries such as broadcasting, cable, and telephone are structured, funded, and regulated; how media organizations create and market programs and products, and how they manage their operations. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to public relations. Examines theory and practice of public relations, how public relations operates in organizations, and its impact on stakeholders and society. Topics include approaches to persuasion, media relations, crisis communication, reputation management, and ethics. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 321, MSCH-C 208, or MSCH-R 321. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Thinking Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Introduces the idea of games systems by breaking down games into their different components to build a deep game literacy. Students will learn how to learn a new game quickly; teach complex games to others; recognize and excel at the many different games played in everyday life. Where most courses have readings, this course has "gamings," required games for students to play and learn. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 210 or TEL-T 366. (3 credit hours.)
      • Critically examines how gender and sexuality are mediated through screen and audio-visual media (including film, video, television, radio, internet) and their cultural contexts. Using humanities approaches, topics might focus on popular media production; various genres, movements, and media cycles; specific cultural and historical contexts; impacts of technological change. Screenings may be required. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 203 or MSCH-C 211. (3 credit hours.)
      • Critically examines how race and/or ethnicity are mediated through screen and audio-visual media (including film, video, television, radio, internet) and their cultural contexts.  Using humanities approaches, topics might focus on representations and debates within mainstream, art, or alternative media.  May address histories of race, racism, and racial justice.  Screenings may be required. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 201 or MSCH-C 212. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course examines the construction of social meaning associated with mediated messages as well as the range of uses and consequences of exposure to mediated messages in individuals, groups, organizations, and society. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 213 or TEL-T 205. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course addresses the psychology of racial prejudice and stereotyping and uses this social-scientific framework to examine the impact of media portrayals. We will focus on how race influences our media consumption decisions and how exposure to certain media messages (in entertainment, news, music, video games) could change racial stereotypes. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 214 or TEL-T 191. (3 credit hours.)
      • Covers the origin and development of the videogame.  Topics include the location and platforms for gaming (arcades, home game consoles, personal computers); social and cultural impacts (stereotypes, gender roles, media effects, violence, regulation and intellectual property); new gaming trends (mobile and social gaming, free-to-play, and cloud gaming). Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 215 or TEL-T 160. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the representation of women in the media and analyzes women's creative work as media producers from a social scientific perspective. The course will include lecture and discussion of areas of critical debate: visual representation across media platforms, women's employment in media industries; women as an audience/consumer group. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 216 or TEL-T 192. (3 credit hours.)
      • Offers an interdisciplinary and historical context for understanding contemporary western 'image culture' by addressing the notion of the 'image' in a wide range of its theoretical, critical, and practical contexts, uses, and history. Examines the claim that our culture is more imagistic than others historically, asking how the roles of images have changed over time in relation to other modes of signification. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 217 or CMCL-C 208. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examination of the social and financial relationships between sports organizations, media and society. Study of the social implications of sports media content in light of economic connections between sports media and college and professional sports teams, including how television contracts influence media coverage and how organization-based media influence audience perceptions. (3 credit hours.)
      • Surveys media industries, products, and publics outside the United States context (e.g., Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America). Analyzes regional media in relation to local/global historical, economic, and social processes. Screenings may be required. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 219 or CMCL-C 202. (3 credit hours.)
    4. Making Media. One (1) course from the .
      • P: Completion of the English Composition requirement; and a grade of C- or higher in MSCH-J 170 or completion of the Media School Placement Test (MPE). Working seminar stressing the creation of journalistic stories for diverse audiences. Students will learn to develop story ideas, gather information, combine visual and verbal messages, and to write and edit news. Credit given for only one of JOUR-H 200, JOUR-J 200, MSCH-C 225, or MSCH-H 225. (3 credit hours.)
  2. News Reporting and Editing Concentration. Each of the following:
    1. Required Courses. Three (3) courses from the .
      • Theories of visual communication including human perception, psychology of color, and principles of design. Application of those theories to photography, video, and computer graphic design in news communication. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 210 or MSCH-C 226. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101. History and philosophy of laws pertaining to free press and free speech. Censorship, libel, contempt, obscenity, right of privacy, copyright, government regulations, and laws affecting the Internet and social media. Stresses responsibilities and freedoms in a democratic communications systems. Credit given for only one of JOUR-H 300, JOUR-J 300, MSCH-H 300, or MSCH-J 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 225 or MSCH-H 225; and MSCH-H 300, or MSCH-J 300; and senior standing. Examines functions and influences of news and public relations professionals in a networked society with primary focus on the United States. Analyzes professional and ethical values of journalists and public relations practicioners working in a digital, participatory media environment. Critical analysis of the relationship of media institutions and society, and the effects of political, economic, and cultural factors on media professionalism. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 410 or MSCH-J 410. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Journalism Research. One (1) course from the .
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-H 300, or MSCH-J 300; and at least junior standing. Study of law relating to media content and production. Advanced examination of the rights of journalists in the American legal system and their role in an evolving media environment. Research using primary legal materials. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 407 or MSCH-J 407. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: At least junior standing; or consent of instructor. Research seminar that examines techniques and processes used in managing media organizations. Through discussions, case analysis, and group projects, the course explores organizational missions and social responsibilities, market analysis techniques, personnel management issues, and budgeting. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 409 or MSCH-J 409. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: At least junior standing; or consent of instructor. Behavioral study of nature, operation, molding, and influence of public opinion, with practice in its measurement and evaluation. Discussion of major political, social, economic, and cultural problems. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 423 or MSCH-J 423. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: At least junior standing; or consent of instructor. Structure and function of international communication systems and barrier to flow of information among nations. Emphasis on gathering and disseminating information around the world. Study of the major newspapers of the world, international news agencies, and international broadcasting and satellite networks. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 448 or MSCH-J 448. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: At least junior standing; or consent of instructor. American social-intellectual history integrated with the story of news media development, emphasizing the historical relationship of the mass media to American social, economic, and cultural patterns and developments. Origin, growth, shortcomings, and achievements of media. Impact of society on the media and vice versa. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 450 or MSCH-J 450. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: At least junior standing; and consent of instructor. Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and materials from term to term. May be repeated for credit with different topics in JOUR-J 460 and MSCH-J 460. (1–4 credit hours.)
      • P: At least junior standing; or consent of instructor. Seminar on problems of communicating news through aural and visual channels. Application of communications theory to broadcast news and public affairs presentations. Study of effects of format, verbal content, nonverbal content, and presenter on communication process. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 470 or MSCH-J 470. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Application for internship credit approved by the school. Application is available on the Media School website. Topical course integrating classroom and field experience. Includes 10-day field experience during or after term offered. Field experience will change based on topic. May be repeated for credit with different topics in JOUR-J 418, MSCH-J 418, and MSCH-X 478. (4 credit hours.)
    3. Statistics. One (1) course from the .
      • R: To be successful in this course, students should have an understanding of basic algebra.. CJUS-K 300 covers the properties of single variables, the measurement of association between pairs of variables, and statistical inference. Additional topics, such as the analyses of qualitative and aggregated data, address specific criminal justice concerns. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370, ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300, MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300, PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201; and MATH-M 118 or consent of instructor. R: ECON-E 202 or ECON-S 202 and MATH-M 119. Lectures emphasize the use of basic probability concepts and statistical theory in the estimation and testing of single parameter and multivariate relationships. In computer labs, using Microsoft Excel, each student calculates descriptive statistics, probabilities, and least squares regression coefficients in situations based on current business and economic events. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370; ANTH-A 306; CJUS-K 300; MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310; POLS-Y 395; PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310; SOC-S 371; STAT-K 310 or STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303; or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Admission to the LAMP honors certificate program. A discussion course emphasizing the use of quantitative methods and analytical skills in exploring and solving business-related problems. Topics vary with the instructor and year and include mathematical modeling and operations research, organizational control, and corporate finance. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: One of MATH-M 106, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-M 212, MATH-S 211, MATH-S 212, MATH-V 118, or, MATH-V 119. Introduction to statistics; nature of statistical data; ordering and manipulation of data; measures of central tendency and dispersion; elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: One of MATH-M 106, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-M 212, MATH-S 211, MATH-S 212, MATH-V 118, or, MATH-V 119. Introduction to probability and statistics; elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Covers concepts of statistical inference and decision; estimation and hypothesis testing; Bayesian inference; and statistical decision theory. Special topics include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduces the logic of statistical inference. Students will learn how to use sample data to reach conclusions about a population of interest by calculating confidence intervals and significance tests. Estimating the effects of multiple independent variables using cross-tabulations and/or regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, STAT-K 310 or STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301, SOC-S 371, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Mastery of high school algebra; or MATH-M 014. Essential statistical concepts and tools for journalists in the age of data, including probability, graphics, descriptive statistics, prediction, study design, comparison, testing, and estimation. The course has a heavier emphasis on writing and reading media reports than other introductory statistics courses. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Mastery of high school algebra; or MATH-M 014. Lecture and laboratory. Introduction to methods for analyzing quantitative data. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models of data, inference about populations from random samples. Regression and analysis of variance. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301. (4 credit hours.)
      • R: Mastery of high school algebra; or MATH-M 014. Introduction to methods for analyzing data arising in the life sciences, designed for biology, human biology, and pre-medical students. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models, fundamental principles of estimation and hypothesis testing, inferences about means, correlation, linear regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303. (3 credit hours.)
    4. Additional Requirements.
      • At least nine (9) credit hours in the concentration must be at the 300–499 level.
      • Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the concentration.
      • A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the concentration—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
  3. Specialization. One (1) of the following Journalism Specializations (see requirements below):
    • Audio Journalism
    • Broadcast Journalism
    • Digital Journalism
    • Graphic Communication
    • News Writing
    • Photojournalism
    • Sports Journalism
    • Video Journalism
  4. Second Concentration. One (1) of the following:
      • Complete a College of Arts and Sciences minor, certificate, or other credential transcripted by the College. If the credential is less than 24 credit hours, electives in MSCH-J or MSCH-R courses must be completed to reach 24 credit hours.
      • Students must follow standard policies for declaring these credentials. Completion of the B.A.J. second concentration will not result in automatic transcription of these credentials.
      • Credit hours earned from coursework outside the College that are applied to credentials within the B.A.J. second concentration will be included in the 100 College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours requirement. These credits from outside the College do not count toward the Bachelor of Arts in Journalism major hours limit, however.
      • Complete at least one (1) additional B.A.J. Specialization (see full list below) plus electives to reach 24 credit hours. Students should consult with their Media School academic advisor about this option because there are limits to how many mass communication credit hours may be taken in the major.
      • The additional B.A.J. specializations are included on the transcript.
      • Complete one (1) of the options below. All options require the completion of an established minor or certificate.
        • Kelley School of Business. In addition to ECON-E 201 Introduction to Microeconomics with a C- or higher, complete either the Minor in Business, Minor in Financial Literacy, Minor in Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management, or Minor in Marketing.
        • School of Education. Complete courses required for high school teacher certification. Interested students should meet with the Director of the High School Journalism Institute for more information.
        • School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering. Students may apply an Informatics minor or the Certificate in Informatics towards the completion of the second concentration. To earn the Certificate in Informatics, students must complete all 27 credit hours. To use an Informatics minor, students must complete additional coursework to meet the 24 credit minimum for the second concentration. Consult with your Media School advisor to identify appropriate courses to meet the credit hour minimum. A minimum grade of C in all courses taken for the certificate is required.
        • Jacobs School of Music. Of the 24 Jacobs School of Music credits needed, at least 14 credit hours of MUS-K, M, T, or Z courses (excluding MUS-Z 110) are required. Applied music courses must be in private instruction in one instrument. No ensemble work may apply. Alternatively, students may complete the special minor offered through the Jacobs School of Music along with additional approved credit hours to reach the 24 required. For more information, see the Minor for Music Scoring for Visual Media in the "Opportunities" section of this Bulletin.
        • School of Public Health. Students interested in using one of the following four SPH minors to complete a B.A.J. second concentration may do so following the stipulations outlined below; however, the College of Arts and Sciences does not recognize these minors for inclusion on a student's transcript.
          • Minor in Kinesiology (plus additional SPH courses from the minor list to total 24 credit hours)
          • Minor in Tourism, Hospitality, and Event Management (plus additional SPH courses from the minor list or the Tourism, Hospitality, and Event Management major list to total 24 credit hours)
          • Minor in Sports Marketing and Management (plus additional SPH courses from the minor list or the Sport Marketing and Management major list to total 24 credit hours)
          • Minor in Event Planning (plus additional SPH courses from the minor list or the Tourism, Hospitality, and Event Management major list to total 24 credit hours)
        • School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Students can complete any of the SPEA minors or certificates transcripted by the College (plus additional SPEA courses to total 24 credit hours).
  5. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Notes

  • * Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Journalism must complete at least 72 credit hours in coursework outside the disciplines of journalism, public relations and mass communication. Also, no more than 6 credits of internship credit can count toward the degree.

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism requirements

The Bachelor of Arts in Journalism degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines.
  2. Non-Media Coursework. At least 72 credit hours (of the 120) must be in coursework outside the disciplines of journalism, public relations and mass communication.
  3. Upper Division Courses. At least 42 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  4. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  5. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  6. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  7. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.