Majors, minors + certificates

Concentration in Cinema and Media Arts—Studies and Production (Bachelor of Arts in Media) (MDAC03)The Media School

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

Cinema and Media Arts—Studies and Production students will take five courses within the concentration. All students will take courses in both "Cinema and Media Arts Production" and "Cinema and Media Arts Studies" to build the skills associated with the creation and a critical understanding of film, television, and digital, screen and aural media. In so doing, they come to understand and engage with both the meanings of media and the processes through which meanings are constructed within a broad range of contexts.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 36 credit hours (12 in the Media Core, 15 in the Concentration, and 9 in the Specialization), including the requirements listed below.

  1. Media School Core. Each of the following:
    1. Introduction to Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Examines the role media play in our lives-at work, at school, among family members, friends, and lovers-and analyzes pressing issues in media and society today, such as privacy, globalization, and convergence. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Must be an Ernie Pyle Scholar or Media Scholar. Examines the role media play in our lives-at work, at school, among family members, friends, and lovers-and analyzes pressing issues in media and society today, such as privacy, globalization, and convergence. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Managing Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Examines what games are and how they are made. Topics include the games industry: its creative dimensions and economic structures; its history and future; the organization of game development teams; the methods and tools used in game production. Students will gain a deeper and more detailed appreciation for this rapidly evolving, fascinating, and sometimes baffling industry. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 200 or TEL-T 260. (3 credit hours.)
      • Pulitzer-winning reporters and other award-winning journalists visit the class to share behind-the-scene details of their projects, their ethical choices and the doubts and challenges they faced along the way. The class explores how journalistic prizes are selected and how they shape the future, not just of journalism, but of democracy. (3 credit hours.)
      • The goal of the course is for students to understand and articulate the issues in global journalism and the role of the media as a participant in shaping societies. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 206 or MSCH-C 206. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introductory analysis, using a case-study method, of how media industries such as broadcasting, cable, and telephone are structured, funded, and regulated; how media organizations create and market programs and products, and how they manage their operations. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to public relations. Examines theory and practice of public relations, how public relations operates in organizations, and its impact on stakeholders and society. Topics include approaches to persuasion, media relations, crisis communication, reputation management, and ethics. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 321, MSCH-C 208, or MSCH-R 321. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Thinking Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Introduces the idea of games systems by breaking down games into their different components to build a deep game literacy. Students will learn how to learn a new game quickly; teach complex games to others; recognize and excel at the many different games played in everyday life. Where most courses have readings, this course has "gamings," required games for students to play and learn. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 210 or TEL-T 366. (3 credit hours.)
      • Critically examines how gender and sexuality are mediated through screen and audio-visual media (including film, video, television, radio, internet) and their cultural contexts. Using humanities approaches, topics might focus on popular media production; various genres, movements, and media cycles; specific cultural and historical contexts; impacts of technological change. Screenings may be required. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 203 or MSCH-C 211. (3 credit hours.)
      • Critically examines how race and/or ethnicity are mediated through screen and audio-visual media (including film, video, television, radio, internet) and their cultural contexts.  Using humanities approaches, topics might focus on representations and debates within mainstream, art, or alternative media.  May address histories of race, racism, and racial justice.  Screenings may be required. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 201 or MSCH-C 212. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course examines the construction of social meaning associated with mediated messages as well as the range of uses and consequences of exposure to mediated messages in individuals, groups, organizations, and society. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 213 or TEL-T 205. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course addresses the psychology of racial prejudice and stereotyping and uses this social-scientific framework to examine the impact of media portrayals. We will focus on how race influences our media consumption decisions and how exposure to certain media messages (in entertainment, news, music, video games) could change racial stereotypes. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 214 or TEL-T 191. (3 credit hours.)
      • Covers the origin and development of the videogame.  Topics include the location and platforms for gaming (arcades, home game consoles, personal computers); social and cultural impacts (stereotypes, gender roles, media effects, violence, regulation and intellectual property); new gaming trends (mobile and social gaming, free-to-play, and cloud gaming). Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 215 or TEL-T 160. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the representation of women in the media and analyzes women's creative work as media producers from a social scientific perspective. The course will include lecture and discussion of areas of critical debate: visual representation across media platforms, women's employment in media industries; women as an audience/consumer group. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 216 or TEL-T 192. (3 credit hours.)
      • Offers an interdisciplinary and historical context for understanding contemporary western 'image culture' by addressing the notion of the 'image' in a wide range of its theoretical, critical, and practical contexts, uses, and history. Examines the claim that our culture is more imagistic than others historically, asking how the roles of images have changed over time in relation to other modes of signification. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 217 or CMCL-C 208. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examination of the social and financial relationships between sports organizations, media and society. Study of the social implications of sports media content in light of economic connections between sports media and college and professional sports teams, including how television contracts influence media coverage and how organization-based media influence audience perceptions. (3 credit hours.)
      • Surveys media industries, products, and publics outside the United States context (e.g., Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America). Analyzes regional media in relation to local/global historical, economic, and social processes. Screenings may be required. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 219 or CMCL-C 202. (3 credit hours.)
    4. Making Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Provides a conceptual framework for writing, designing, and evaluating a variety of media products. This is not a hands-on production course but does offer an overview of the production process. Topics include scriptwriting, production design, visualization, composition, editing styles, and others. This course is a prerequisite for advanced-level courses in the design/production area. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206. (3 credit hours.)
      • Theories of visual communication including human perception, psychology of color, and principles of design. Application of those theories to photography, video, and computer graphic design in news communication. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 210 or MSCH-C 226. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101; and MSCH-C 223. Introductory hands-on video production course builds on fundamentals of audio/visual storytelling through training in the creative use of cameras, lighting and sound equipment, and editing software. Students design, develop, shoot, edit and deliver original videos in both single-camera field production and multi-camera TV studio production environments. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Concentration. Each of the following:
    1. Cinema and Media Studies. Two (2) courses from the .
      • Cinema/Media studies courses
      • Relationship between communication media and a range of social institutions, practices, and beliefs. Course may focus on a particular medium and/or period (e.g., television and family, film and the Cold War, censorship and the media). Topic varies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 204 and MSCH-F 204. (3 credit hours.)
      • Historical survey of the American motion picture industry from 1895 to 1948. Emphasizes narrative cinema and the classical studio system. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 290 or MSCH-F 290. (3 credit hours.)
      • Historical survey of the American motion picture industry from 1948 to the present. Emphasizes narrative cinema and its increasing relation to television and home entertainment. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 292 or MSCH-F 292. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study of the main schools and methods of media criticism; emphasis on developing the analytical and critical skills necessary for writing film, television, and/or other types of media criticism. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 306 or MSCH-F 306. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the cultural contestation of images of war and peace with a focus on the materiality of political images in a variety of verbal, visual, and acoustic media across a range of cultural forms such as film, literature, art, public memorials, and political texts. May be repeated when the focus is on a different country or region for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 311 or MSCH-F 309. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101. Historical development of media forms, institutions, and technology, from the origins of writing to digital media. Attention to characteristics of media, changes in media's role as a cultural force, transformations to media institutions, and the role of media in the development of public discourse. Considers continuity and change over time. Credit given for only one of MSCH-F 311 or TEL-T 311. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101; or consent of instructor. Topic varies: in-depth analysis of directors, producers, or creative individuals in the media, viewed as 'authors.' May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 326 and MSCH-F 326. (3 credit hours.)
      • Critical exploration of the form, content, and uses of popular culture in everyday life. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 336 and MSCH-F 336. (3 credit hours.)
      • Construction of race and gender identities across a range of media. Emphasis on the power of sound/image representations to shape and contest ideas about race and gender. Topic varies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 412, JOUR-J 375, or MSCH-F 375. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines filmmaking in the black diaspora as a formally innovative visual and narrative art form in world cinema. Studies select films for their political and cultural significance and shared themes. Topics include colonialism and postcoloniality; race, gender and sexuality; migration and exile; modernity; and the dislocating processes of globalization. (3 credit hours.)
      • Studies audiences in the context of film, television, new media, and other media forms. Topic varies, but may include a focus on theories of spectatorship, historical reception studies, ethnographic and/or empirical audience studies, global or transnational audiences, Internet communities, performance theory, fan cultures, and subcultures. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 391 and MSCH-F 391. (3 credit hours.)
      • Topic varies. Analysis of typical genres, such as westerns, situation comedies, documentaries, etc. Problems of generic description or definition: themes, conventions, iconography peculiar to given genres. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 392 and MSCH-F 392. (3 credit hours.)
      • Historical survey of major national cinemas. Subject varies. Topics include Brazilian cinema, British cinema, Chinese cinema, French National cinema, German film culture, Indian cinema, and Italian cinema. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 398 and MSCH-F 398. (3 credit hours.)
      • Electronic media's role in altering perceptions of time, space, locality, and identity. Explores changing economic, political, and cultural relations in the global media environment. Topic varies and may include global media events, transborder information flows, cultural differences in media forms and practices. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 413 and MSCH-F 413. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines contemporary film authorship in collaboration with the IU Cinema. Students attend lectures by visiting filmmakers and attend screenings of their films and discuss film criticism and review. (3 credit hours.)
      • Media historiography, topics in national media history, national and international movements and trends. Topic varies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 420 and MSCH-F 420. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the role of media in the political process. Topic varies and may include censorship and free speech, social movements, politics of representation. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 445 or MSCH-F 445. (3 credit hours.)
      • Other courses
      • Develops frameworks for understanding new media technologies in social contexts. Compares computing, networked digital media, and social media to prior eras of technological change, focusing on interactions among technological, industrial, regulatory, social, and cultural forces. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 337 and MSCH-D 337. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: At least junior standing; and consent of director of undergraduate studies. Readings directed by a member of the faculty. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 399 and MSCH-H 399. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: At least junior standing; or consent of instructor. American social-intellectual history integrated with the story of news media development, emphasizing the historical relationship of the mass media to American social, economic, and cultural patterns and developments. Origin, growth, shortcomings, and achievements of media. Impact of society on the media and vice versa. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 450 or MSCH-J 450. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: At least junior standing; or consent of instructor. Seminar on problems of communicating news through aural and visual channels. Application of communications theory to broadcast news and public affairs presentations. Study of effects of format, verbal content, nonverbal content, and presenter on communication process. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 470 or MSCH-J 470. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the social, economic, and cultural forces that influence the creation of programs and genres in the media industries. Topic varies, but may explore the role of networks, advertisers, studios, and independent producers. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 411 or MSCH-M 411. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 207; or consent of instructor. Seminar exploring issues in televised sports in support of and in conflict with other cultural icons in society, business, and education. Includes writing on the ways sports, as program content, influences the television industry and on the ways television influences college and professional sports. Credit given for only one of MSCH-S 445 or TEL-T 445. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101. Basic media theories as well as cognitive, emotional, and social psychology, with a focus on how these theories can be applied to the design of media messages. Special attention given to interactive and immersive mediated environments. Credit given for only one of MSCH-S 471 or TEL-T 471. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: CMCL-C 190, MSCH-C 101, or consent of instructor. Survey of writings, concepts, and movements in media theory. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 410 or MSCH-T 410. (3 credit hours.)
      • Three (3) credit hours from the following:
        • A service-learning seminar that offers students hands-on experience working with community-based media production. Topics range from film festival programming to community broadcasting. Students learn to develop concept, communication and operational strategies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 385, MSCH-P 384, and MSCH-X 370. (1–3 credit hours.)
        • P: At least junior standing; at least 12 credit hours completed in the school; and application for internship credit approved by the school. Application is available on the Media School website. Faculty-supervised work in a media field related to student's academic interests. Credits based on at least 45 work hours per credit hour with a maximum of 6 credit hours applied toward the B.A. in Media or the B.S. in Game Design. Student must write a critical analysis paper and be evaluated by a workplace supervisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 382, MSCH-I 382, MSCH-I 497, MSCH-X 472, or TEL-T 497. (1–3 credit hours.)
    2. Cinema and Media Production. Two (2) courses from the .
      • Production courses
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C221, MSCH-C 223, TEL-T 206, or TEL-T 211; or consent of instructor. Covers format, structure, and writing of dramatic and nondramatic scripts. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 331 or TEL-T 331. (3 credit hours.)
      • Provides conceptual and hands-on experience for researching, writing, and producing different genres of video programs using VRA camcorders and editing systems. This course emphasizes conceptual processes from the original script to the completed video. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 335 and MSCH-P 335. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; and in MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283; and consent of instructor. Lab fee required. Intermediate, hands-on production course that covers acquisition and post-production, including composition, continuity, sound, lighting and digital editing. Provides practical experience in the planning, shooting, and editing of video programs using both Avid and Final Cut Pro software. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 351 or TEL-T 351. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223. Analyze and assemble dramatic scenes under a variety of conditions and narrative strategies. Examine editing theories, techniques and procedures, issues of continuity, effects, movement and sound as they relate to the fundamentals of cinematic montage and visual storytelling. Explore a variety of topics and experiences designed to broaden understanding of the art of cinematic storytelling and montage. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; and in MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283; and consent of instructor. Intermediate-level hands-on production course that concentrates on the planning and production of audio materials for radio, video, and interactive media. Topics include sound theory, recording, and editing. Includes analog and digital technologies. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P353 or TEL-T 353. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; and in one of MSCH-C 228, MSCH-G 320, TEL-T 283, or TEL-T 284; and consent of instructor. Lab fee required. Intermediate, hands-on production course that teaches the technical skills and creative principles needed to create television graphics. Students will critique and design both still and animated imagery and build effective program graphics using Adobe Photoshop and related software. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 354 or TEL-T 354. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; and in MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283; and consent of instructor. Lab fee required. Intermediate, hands-on production course that teaches TV studio production. Students will gain technical proficiency within the TV studio environment and learn directing and other high-level communication skills required to produce multi-camera studio projects. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 356 or TEL-T 356. (3 credit hours.)
      • Lab fee required. A hands-on introduction to the technical and aesthetic basics of making 16mm silent films. Students learn how to design, direct, light, shoot, and edit several short films working individually and in groups. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 360 or MSCH-P 360. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: CMCL-C 360 or MSCH-P 360. Lab fee required. Introduction to the making of 16mm sound films, including the recording and editing of synch sound. The various stages of production are explored in lectures, lab exercises, and discussions. Each student designs, directs, and edits a short synch sound film and participates as a crew member in the other students' productions. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 361 or MSCH-P 361. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-P 351 or MSCH-P 360. Create cinematic shots using industry standard technologies. Cinematography theories; techniques and procedure; visual language; shot types and coverage; and camera movement and composition are examined. Topics and experiences designed to broaden understanding of cinematic storytelling and montage. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 228, MSCH-G 320, TEL-T 283, or TEL-T 284; or consent of instructor. Lab fee required. Develops basic sound design technique for linear and nonlinear media (video, animation, games, and interactive content). Explores basic concepts of sound in the context of audiovisual relationships through production and analysis. Develops media communication skills through the use of sound and image. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 369 or TEL-T 369. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 207, MSCH-C 213, TEL-T 205, or TEL-T 206; or consent of instructor. Critical analysis of the form, production, and performance elements of program genres including drama, comedy, talk and game shows, documentaries, news, and emerging or experimental types of mass media content. Explores the relationships between programming, the media industries, and American culture. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 416 or TEL-T 416. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-P 351, MSCH-P 352, or MSCH-P 360. The last phase of the post-production process for cinematic and television content is preparing media for distribution. This hands-on class teaches the technical skills required for exposure adjustments, balancing colors, adjusting skin tones, creating and applying stylized looks and film emulation, and creating and working with metadata. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-P 331. Advanced screenwriting course in which students conceive, develop, write, and revise an original feature film script. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-P 331. Advanced screenwriting course in which students conceive, develop, write and revise an original TV series pilot script, the series Bible, and the outline of nine episodes. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283; and in one 300-level production course; and consent of instructor. Overview of historic and contemporary television documentaries. Analyzes how narratives describe individuals, cultures, and events. Examines the role of producer as historian, explorer, social activist, journalist, and entertainer. Covers the development process in creating documentaries, including research, legal issues, story development, evaluation, and other preproduction activities. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 433 or TEL-T 431. (3 credit hours.)
      • Explores the variety of documentary film practice. Examines fundamental issues, style, and techniques (realism, voice, ethics, observation, interview, re-enactment, etc.) through hands-on exercises, screenings, discussions, lectures, and the making of a short form documentary. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 434 or TEL-T 435. (3 credit hours.)
      • Focuses on developing and producing a larger scale documentary, including research, story development, writing, filming and editing. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 435 or MSCH-P 435. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; and in MSCH-C 228, MSCH-G 320, TEL-T 283, or TEL-T 284; and in two 300-level production courses; and consent of instructor. A capstone course for those in production sequence. Students plan, direct, and produce programs or program segments that may air on WTIU, Indiana University's public television station. May be repeated with different topics in MSCH-P 436 and TEL-T 436. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • P: CMCL-C 360 or MSCH-P 360. An exploration of techniques and concepts of experimental filmmaking which builds on the foundation of other production classes. For students with a solid background in basic cinematography and visual storytelling, as well as in the fundamentals of digital editing. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 438 or MSCH-P 438. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-P 351 or MSCH-P 360. Focuses on scripted storytelling and helps students develop their own style, tone, and voice as a visual storyteller. By analyzing classic and contemporary work, discussing visual language and design, and directing various short film projects, students develop an understanding of the art of directing narrative film. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-P 351 or MSCH-P 360. Learn how to direct for narrative motion pictures, including how to communicate, collaborate, problem-solve and develop actors and characters. Includes screenings and analysis as well as short-form projects with actors. Topics and experiences are designed to broaden understanding of the art of directing narrative film. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; or consent of instructor. Exploration of design or production problems and issues in telecommunications. Topics vary. May be repeated with different topics in MSCH-P 452 and TEL-T 452. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; and in MSCH-C 228, MSCH-G 320, TEL-T 283 or TEL-T 284; and in MSCH-P 354 or TEL-T 354; and consent of instructor. Lab fee required. Advanced, hands-on production course that teaches the technical skills and creative principles required to design and author DVDs. Students will edit digital video; encode audio and video; propose and script a DVD project; create graphics, menus, buttons; design and test navigation; and author and produce DVDs. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 454 or TEL-T 454. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Consent of instructor and demonstrated background in MIDI and composition; and at least junior standing. Specialized techniques course developing students' skills in music scoring for visual media. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 18 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • P: One of CMCL-C 335, CMCL-C 360, MSCH-P 335, or MSCH-P 360; and consent of instructor. Lab fee required. Students produce one personal project (narrative, documentary, or experimental) from script to screen, using either 16 mm. or digital video. Each class meeting devoted to discussing the students' projects and exploring the aesthetic and technical issues involved. Each student assists in the production of at least one other project by a fellow student. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 460 or MSCH-P 460. (4 credit hours.)
      • The effective communication of ideas through the language of cinema including producing, directing, editing, cinematography and sound. Students produce a video project in collaboration with classmates while studying in greater Los Angeles. (4 credit hours.)
      • Other courses
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101; and MSCH-C 207. Examines principles of media advertising and applications across platforms and audiences. Analyzes the advertising industry structures and processes, including the roles of agencies, creative teams, station representatives, and buyers. Topics include the social and individual effects of advertising, ethical issues in advertising, and considerations for advertising in a global marketplace. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 300, MSCH-A 320, MSCH-A 337, or TEL-T 340. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-A 300, MSCH-C 101, and MSCH-C 207. Students develop creative and implementation skills with intensive practice producing effective integrated communication strategies, concepts, copy, and design for print, broadcast, direct, mobile, digital, and social media campaigns. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 305, MSCH-A 420, or JOUR-J 420. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Develops frameworks for understanding new media technologies in social contexts. Compares computing, networked digital media, and social media to prior eras of technological change, focusing on interactions among technological, industrial, regulatory, social, and cultural forces. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 337 and MSCH-D 337. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223, MSCH-G 320, TEL-T 206, or TEL-T 284; or consent of instructor. Lab fee required. Project-based class focused on implementing the skills learned in the introductory classes and applying them to real-world problems. Design, implement, and test a significant Web site for a real client either individually or in groups. Credit given for only one of MSCH-D 435 or TEL-T 433. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study of the main schools and methods of media criticism; emphasis on developing the analytical and critical skills necessary for writing film, television, and/or other types of media criticism. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 306 or MSCH-F 306. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-G 300 or TEL-T 361. Student development teams take interactive multimedia design skills to the next level learning advanced techniques for conceiving and producing games. Course combines hands-on experience using state-of-the-art game engines and industry production methods such as Agile and Waterfall with practice in overcoming obstacles such as bugs, poor communication, absent leadership. Prototypes will be tested and the results will be reported and analyzed in statistical form. Credit given for only one of MSCH-G 400 or TEL-T 461. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101; and MSCH-C 225 or MSCH-H 225; and MSCH-C 226. Explores non-linear methods of storytelling and how Web-based tools can enhance journalism written and online work. In addition to building existing skills, students use photography and embedded audio to create story packages for an online magazine. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 303 or MSCH-J 303. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101; and MSCH-C 225 or MSCH-H 225; and MSCH-C 226. Must have own camera. Intermediate photojournalism course focused on advanced camera operation, visual storytelling, and photo editing in a digital media environment. Produce, edit, publish, and critique assignments: portraits, news, features, sports, and multimedia photo essays. Readings and discussions address ethics, law, history, and professional practice. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 344 or MSCH-J 344. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: At least sophomore standing; and a grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 226; or consent of instructor. Hands-on experiences in reporting, editing and presenting stories in images, sound and spoken word. Goes beyond basic skills with advanced cameras and software. Create projects including Podcast, Audio slideshow, web video, and Portfolio website to display projects. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 362 or MSCH-J 362. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101. Introduction to the design, creation, and maintenance of websites and mobile platforms. Students learn design standards and how to apply them in the design of messages using multiple media. Course progresses from introductory work on web design to a culminating project employing responsive design. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-H 353. Advanced writing, reporting and editing techniques. Producing television news stories and programs in field and studio environments with emphasis on conventional and innovative broadcast story forms. Practice in presentation skills and social media as applied to broadcast news stories with local and regional significance. Students produce a weekly news broadcast. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 385 or MSCH-J 385. (3 credit hours.)
      • A study of literary forms and techniques used in journalism. Topics to be considered include formal considerations such as voice and structure, reporting methods and ethical issues. Students will supplement reading with writing experimental pieces of their own. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 415 or MSCH-J 415. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-J 344. Advanced techniques of reporting and interpreting news with photography practice in news, sports, features, photographic essays, color photography, electronic imaging, and studio illustration. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 444 or MSCH-J 444. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 226. Instruction in page design, illustration and web design informed by design theory emphasizing critical thinking, creative problem solving and ethical practice. Use Adobe programs, HTML, CSS and other coding to produce original media projects for mass and targeted audiences. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 463 or MSCH-J 463. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-J 463. Analysis of quantitative data and creation of visual informational graphics for media audiences. Introduction to interactive data visualization through scripting and online tools. Creation of chart packages, data maps and explanatory diagrams for publication to mass and targeted audiences. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 464 or MSCH-J 464. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-J 463. Continues from Graphic Design I, incorporating advanced digital graphic design skills and creative problem solving for a series of media projects using illustration, logo design, creative typography and layout in a variety of media formats including print and interactive design for mobile devices. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 465 or MSCH-J 465. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; and in MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283; or consent of instructor. The management of commercial and noncommercial telecommunications projects, including television and news media. Organizational, economic/ business, and legal aspects of production management. Credit given for only one of MSCH-M 330 or TEL-T 330. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the social, economic, and cultural forces that influence the creation of programs and genres in the media industries. Topic varies, but may explore the role of networks, advertisers, studios, and independent producers. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 411 or MSCH-M 411. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207; or consent of instructor. Advanced study of media from a global perspective focusing on particulars, trends, or issues. Topics vary. Credit given for only one of MSCH-M 413 or TEL-T 413. (3 credit hours.)
      • Three (3) credit hours from the following:
        • P: At least junior standing; at least 12 credit hours completed in the school; and application for internship credit approved by the school. Application is available on the Media School website. Faculty-supervised work in a media field related to student's academic interests. Credits based on at least 45 work hours per credit hour with a maximum of 6 credit hours applied toward the B.A. in Media or the B.S. in Game Design. Student must write a critical analysis paper and be evaluated by a workplace supervisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 382, MSCH-I 382, MSCH-I 497, MSCH-X 472, or TEL-T 497. (1–3 credit hours.)
        • P: Application for internship credit approved by the school. Application is available on the Media School website. Work commitment: 40 hrs/week for a minimum of 9 weeks in a 15-week term. Supervised professional experience. Off-campus, professionally supervised course taught online. The course involves fieldwork (the internship itself), assignments, development of a student portfolio, and supervisor evaluations. Full-time status for Registrar, not always for Financial Aid. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 491, MSCH-I 491, or MSCH-X 473. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: Application for internship credit approved by the school. Application is available on the Media School website. Students secure an internship and enroll for one, two or three credit hours, based on at least 120 work hours per credit hour with a maximum of three credit hours applied toward the B.A.J. Student must write a critical analysis paper and be evaluated by a workplace supervisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours in JOUR-J 492, MSCH-I 492, and MSCH-X 474. S/F grading. (1–3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 228; and consent of instructor. With close supervision by WTIU station or production management, student is responsible for pre-production planning, production coordination and execution, postproduction, critical and audience evaluation of programs for broadcast. Develop professional working relationships and portfolio. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in MSCH-P 437, MSCH-X 476, and TEL-T 437. (1–3 credit hours.)
        • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Application for internship credit approved by the school. Application is available on the Media School website. Topical course integrating classroom and field experience. Includes 10-day field experience during or after term offered. Field experience will change based on topic. May be repeated for credit with different topics in JOUR-J 418, MSCH-J 418, and MSCH-X 478. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: Application approved by director of undergraduate studies, instructor, and facilities and technology director (when relevant). Application is available on the Media School website. Opportunity for individual and group projects in media production and journalism; work with faculty member on individual or group basis. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in MSCH-X 475, MSCH-X 490, and TEL-T 498. (1–6 credit hours.)
    3. Elective. One (1) additional course from 2a or 2b above.
    4. Additional Requirements.
      • At least nine (9) credit hours in the concentration must be at the 300–499 level.
      • Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the concentration.
      • A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the concentration—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
  3. Specialization.
    • One (1) Media Specialization (see list below)
  4. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Arts requirements

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines. No more than 42 of these credit hours can come from the major.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 42 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.