Majors, minors + certificates

Certificate in Neuroscience (NEURSCACRT)Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

A student may earn a certificate as part of completing the bachelor's degree and in addition to completing requirements for a major. Through coursework and lab experiences in this interdisciplinary certificate program, students will develop an in-depth understanding in neuroscience, from the cellular and molecular bases of nervous system function, to a systems-level approach to the study of brain-behavior relationships.

Certificate requirements

The certificate requires at least 24 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introductory Psychology. One (1) course from the .
    • Introduction to psychology; its methods, data, and theoretical interpretations in areas of learning, sensory psychology, and psychophysiology. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 101, PSY-P 106, PSY-P 151, or PSY-P 155. Equivalent to IUPUI PSY-B 105 and PSY-P 151. (3 credit hours.)
    • An introduction to psychological and brain sciences for psychology majors. Introduces students to the history of psychology and its place in science, to the experimental method, and to the broad range of topics studied by psychological scientists. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 101, PSY-P 106, PSY-P 151, or PSY-P 155. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Neuroscience. One (1) course from the .
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155; and one of BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 111, BIOL-L 112, or equivalent. An examination of the cellular bases of behavior, emphasizing contemporary views and approaches to the study of the nervous system. Neural structure, function, and organization are considered in relation to sensory and motor function, motivation, learning, and other basic behaviors. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. R: 3 credits of Biology such as BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 111, BIOL-L 112, BIOL-A 215, or BIOL-P 215. A survey of contemporary neuroscience, examining the neural basis of behavior with approaches including molecular, cellular, developmental, cognitive, and behavioral neuroscience. Sensory and motor function, learning and memory, and other behaviors are considered using anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, and genetic approaches, providing a balanced view of neuroscience. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. (3 credit hours.)
  3. Foundations of Biology. One (1) course from the .
    • P: Permission of IFLE Director/Biology Department. Intensive seminar/laboratory experience exploring the interdisciplinary nature of the modern life sciences. The course will revolve around a central question chosen by the students and will analyze how life scientists from biochemistry, cellular/molecular biology, and neuroscience might contribute to the common understanding of a fundamental problem. Credit given for only one of BIOL-E 112, BIOL-H 111, BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 112, or BIOL-Q 201. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: High school or college chemistry. For biology and other science majors. Integrated picture of manner in which organisms at diverse levels of organization meet problems in maintaining and propagating life. Credit given for only one of BIOL-E 112, BIOL-H 111, BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 112, BIOL-Q 201. (4 credit hours.)
  4. Advanced Neuroscience courses. Four (4) courses from the .
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Psychological disorders such as depression and autism exact a huge toll in human suffering and social costs. This course surveys the role of disturbed neural mechanisms on the development of psychological disorders. Methods for investigating the relationship between a disorder and proposed mechanisms will be critically evaluated. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. An overview of the field of cognitive neuroscience. The neural basis of cognition is studied by considering the impact of neuropsychological case studies, neuroimaging (ERP and fMRI), and behavioral investigations on our understanding of sensory-motor systems, learning, memory, emotion, and spatial behavior. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. The physiological and neural bases of selected behavioral processes (for example, hunger, thirst, sleep, addiction, aggression, sex) will be examined as a means of understanding individual behavior and then in relation to larger, related issues of ethics, law, and societal organization. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Didactic lectures by faculty, laboratory demonstrations, and seminars/class discussions led by students examine non-verbal communication and mind-brain-body relationships. Topics include reading faces and bodies, microexpressions, emotion and emotional contagion. Assessment is based on presentations, student-led discussions, participation in class, and written critiques on selected readings. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Provides an overview of the field of developmental cognitive neuroscience, the study of the relation among human brain function, development, and behavior. Critically examines recent research that applies an integration of neurobiological and psychological perspectives to the study of typical and atypical cognitive development. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Introduction to the major psychoactive drugs and how they act upon the brain to influence behavior. Discussion of the role of drugs as therapeutic agents for various clinical disorders and as probes to provide insight into brain function. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Detailed description of the neural systems responsible for vision, touch, hearing, taste, smell, and balance. Similarities and differences in the strategies employed by these systems will be stressed. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Examination of the interaction of the developing brain with the behavior it mediates. Cellular systems and organismal levels of analysis will all be considered in the organization of structure function relationships in the neural basis of behavior. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Comprehensive survey of theories and data concerned with neural correlates of associative and non-associative forms of learning and memory. Vertebrate and invertebrate model systems and preparations as well as data obtained from the human neuropsychology literature will be studied. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. A critical examination of neurological functioning with respect to human and other animal behavior. Assesses the behavioral functions of neural structures and systems through understanding the behavioral consequences of brain damage and through basic experimental study. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346; and two biology courses (e.g., BIOL-L 112, BIOL-L 211). Concurrent enrollment in PSY-P 346 and biology courses only with consent of the instructor. Provides an in-depth look at the neurobiological bases of addictions, from the cellular, molecular, and systems neuroscience levels of analysis. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326, PSY-P 335, or PSY-P 346. Introduction to the neuroscience of language comprehension, including the basic neuroanatomy of the language system and levels of processing from single word to discourse level. Discussion of such language disorders as dyslexia and aphasia. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326, PSY-P 335, or PSY-P 346. An exploration of how individuals make decisions and what different parts of the brain contribute to decision-making. Focuses on the cognitive psychology of decision-making and on exciting recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience of decision-making, including the new field of neuroeconomics. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346 with a grade of B or higher. R: A biology course at the 300–400 level. Recent and historical literature in the field of reproductive neuroscience. Includes information about sexual differentiation of the brain during development and puberty, sexual differentiation of the neurophysiology of the reproductive tract, decision making in sexual context, and human studies of sexuality. Develops skills to critically evaluate basic scientific literature and develop presentations. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Prerequisites vary according to the topics offered and are specified in the Schedule of Classes each term. Studies in special topics not ordinarily covered in other departmental courses. Topics vary with instructor and semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Introduction to the cellular and molecular processes that give the nervous system its unique character. Covers the cell biology of neurons and glia and mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Examines the genetic and molecular approaches to the biological basis for higher brain functions such as learning and memory. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 466. Provides insights into some of the diseases that affect the nervous system from a cellular and molecular perspective. Studies the pathological processes affecting neurons and glia that underlie their malfunction or death. Explores in depth some neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and dementia. Also explores experimental approaches to uncover the molecular basis of some of the diseases. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. This seminar examines the neurobiology of stress effects on cognition, psychopathology, and health, from the cellular to the systems level. Through readings from primary literature, discussions, and lectures, students will develop a base of knowledge and think critically about the neural and behavioral effects of stress. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. In-depth discussion of primary research papers used to introduce neuroscience-oriented students to classical and contemporary techniques used in cellular and molecular research. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Brain Behavior and Evolution ") P: BIOL-L 111; BIOL-L 113; and BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Topics not related extensively in other courses. The topic will vary depending on the instructor and on student needs. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (2–3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. Explores a variety of topics related to the evolution of nervous systems, with a focus on vertebrate brains. Topics include comparative neuroanatomy, methods, approaches to homology, the meaning of changes in size, ecological and behavioral specializations, developmental constraints, and a consideration of how special (or not) human brains are. A basic background in neuroscience is recommended but not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112; and junior or senior standing. R: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Addresses the intersection of two disciplines: animal behavior and neurobiology. Uses integrative and comparative approaches to understand how the nervous system controls animal behavior in natural contexts and how neural circuits evolve to generate diversity in behavior. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: PSY-P 101. An introduction to the neural mechanisms underlying complex cognition, and a survey of topics in neuroscience related to cognition. The course provides a solid background in human biopsychology. If COGS-Q 301 is not offered in a given year, PSY-P 423 Human Neuropsychology may be substituted for this course. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PHYS-H 222, PHYS-P 202, or PHYS-P 222; and MATH-M 120 or MATH-M 211. . Introduction to quantitative methods for life sciences, emphasizing how living systems process information. Topics include noise in sensory signals; consequences for sensory processing; uncertainty and decision making; neural networks, excitable waves in neurons and muscle; stability/instability; models of development and morphogenesis. Open to students in the physical or life sciences. (3 credit hours.)
  5. Laboratory. One (1) course from the
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Experiments with and demonstrations of contemporary approaches in behavioral neuroscience. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Laboratory experience in all facets of a neuroimaging experiment, including experimental design, data acquisition, data analysis, data interpretation, and data presentation. Introductory magnetic resonance (MR) physics and the physiology of blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) changes are included. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-K 300 or equivalent; and PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Surveys the principles/practice of human brain electrical activity recording techniques used in research and in the clinic, including electroencephalography (EEG) and event related potentials (ERPs). Primarily hands-on lab learning, small group recording practice and subsequent data analysis, supplemented by lectures, seminars, discussions and demonstrations. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. R: BIOL-L 211. Laboratory course designed to provide the advanced undergraduate with training in molecular techniques useful for studying the nervous system. Techniques will include PCR, subcloning, bacterial transformation, mammalian cell transfection, working with fluorescent proteins, RNA interference, Western blotting and sectioning/staining brain tissues. (3–4 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of department. R: PSY-X 397, PSY-X 398, or PSY-X 497. An approved research agreement must be in place. Counts toward capstone credit or neuroscience lab credit in approved labs. The capstone experience in a series of supervised research courses that require active participation in research in a single lab. Course requires a research plan and progress reports. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in PSY-P 494 and PSY-X 498. (2–3 credit hours.)
    • With Department approval:
      • P: Consent of departmental honors committee. May be substituted for advanced laboratory requirement or, given the permission of the departmental honors committee, for certain other requirements in the program for majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–12 credit hours.)
      • P: Overall GPA 2.500 or above; and written consent of faculty member supervising research. Must present oral report to complete more than 6 credit hours. Must complete a written assignment as evidence of each semester's work. Section authorization. Maximum of 6 credits allowed for summer research. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours in BIOL-L 490 and BIOL-X 490. (1–12 credit hours.)
      • P: Consent of research director and department; and two semesters of CHEM-C 409 or CHEM-X 399. For outstanding students in research. May be used to satisfy upper-level laboratory credit hour requirements in the B.S. major; may not be used in fulfillment of chemistry major credit hours in a B.A. major. A written research thesis with oral presentation is required. CHEM-X 399 (CHEM-C 409) and CHEM-X 499 (CHEM-G 410) may not be taken concurrently during the same semester. Credit given for only one of CHEM-G 410 or CHEM-X 499. (2 credit hours.)
      • P: Consent of instructor or supervisor. Research participation in group or independent project under the supervision of a faculty member in departmental research areas; or topic agreed upon between the student and supervisor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in PHYS-S 406 and PHYS-X 498. (1–6 credit hours.)
      • P: Consent of instructor. Individual study under guidance of faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in SPHS-S 480 and SPHS-X 490. (1–3 credit hours.)
  6. Elective. One (1) course from the .
    • P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; or PSY-P 155. Focuses on the role of psychological factors in health and illness. Through readings, lecture, and discussion, students will become better consumers of research on behavior-health interactions and develop a broad base of knowledge concerning how behaviors and other psychological factors can affect health both positively and negatively. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. R: MATH-M 026, MATH-M 119, or introductory physics. Basic data, theories, psychophysics, illusions, and other topics fundamental to understanding sensory and perceptual processes. (3 credit hours.)
    • ANAT-A 464
    • For biology and other science majors. Preference will be given to freshmen and sophomores. Focus is on the processes of evolution leading to organismal diversity and adaptation, as well as basic ecological concepts. Credit not given for both BIOL-E 111 and BIOL-L 111. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112; and CHEM-C 105, CHEM-C 117, CHEM-H 117, CHEM-J 117, or CHEM-S 117. Covers structure and function of DNA and RNA; DNA replication, mechanisms of mutation, repair, recombination, and transposition; mechanisms and regulation of gene expression; and the genetic code, transcription, and translation. Introduces bacteriophages, plasmids, and the technology of recombinant DNA. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Analysis of the mechanisms of inheritance, including developmental processes that lead to the construction of whole organisms and to the transmission to their offspring of specific genetic traits. Includes the principles of genetics and the analysis of mutations affecting development. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-S 311. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Current views of the structure and function of cellular organelles and components, with emphasis on the flow of information through the cell, the metabolism that supports cellular functions, and differences among different specialized cells. Current techniques will be stressed. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 312 or BIOL-L 330. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211; and CHEM-C 101, CHEM-C 117, CHEM-H 117, CHEM-J 117, or CHEM-S 117. R: BIOL-L 312. Introductory course exploring the basic components and function of the immune system, stressing mechanisms that protect humans against pathogens and also how its dysfunction can lead to autoimmune disease, allergy, and cancer. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-S 311. Principles of human genetics are presented. The emphasis is on new developments in the field afforded by present-day techniques in molecular biology. Among the topics considered are sex inheritance, molecular basis of genetic diseases, oncogenesis, and immune system structure. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-S 311. Analysis of the developmental processes that lead to the construction of whole organisms from single stem cells. Covers the molecular and genetic analysis of mutations and pathways that disrupt these processes and cause disease. Other topics include adult stem cells and their role in tissue regeneration. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 317 or BIOL-L 417. (3 credit hours.)
    • Intended for the junior or senior science major. Course in human physiology designed to introduce the senior undergraduate student to the function of the human body in health, disease, and extreme environments. Emphasizes how the different organ systems work to maintain homeostasis and how organ function is integrated. The content and key concepts are presented in order to provide students insight into the scientific process through problem-solving and exploration of resources. Utilizes experimental inquiry, case-based and problem-oriented methodology with students working in teams, and an emphasis on clinical application. The laboratory component is incorporated into the structure of the course. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. R: CHEM-C 341. Mechanisms of hormone action from the molecular to the organismal level in vertebrates. (3 credit hours.)
    • 2 course sequence:
      • Usually taken concurrently with CHEM-C 121. Essential principles of chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, properties and reactions of elements and compounds, stoichiometry, solutions, and acids and bases. For students who are not planning careers in the sciences and for those with no previous coursework in chemistry. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 101 or CHEM-C 103. (3 credit hours.)
      • P or C: CHEM-C 101. Introduction to the techniques and reasoning of experimental chemistry. Emphasis is given to study of physical and chemical properties of inorganic compounds. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 101 and CHEM-C 121; or CHEM-C 103. (2 credit hours.)
    • 2 course sequence:
      • P: CHEM-C 101. Usually taken concurrently with CHEM-C 122. Continuation of CHEM-C 101. The chemistry of organic compounds and their reactions followed by an extensive introduction to biochemistry. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: CHEM-C 101 and CHEM-C 121. P or C: CHEM-C 102. Continuation of CHEM-C 121. Emphasis on organic and biochemical experimental techniques. (2 credit hours.)
    • Designed specifically to alleviate deficiencies in chemistry and prepare students for CHEM-C 117-CHEM-C 127. Content includes applications of measurement and chemical formula/equation conversions; modern view of the atom; and solution processes that relate to chemical reactions. Lectures, labs, and discussion sections will emphasize problem-solving strategies. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 103; or CHEM-C 101 and CHEM-C 121. (5 credit hours.)
    • 2 course sequence:
      • Basic principles, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic and molecular structure, gases, solution, and topics in descriptive chemistry. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to laboratory experimentation, with particular emphasis on the collection and use of experimental data, some properties of solutions, stoichiometry, and synthesis. (2 credit hours.)
    • 2 course sequence:
      • Chemical equilibria with emphasis on acids, bases, solubility, electrochemistry, elementary thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and selected topics in descriptive chemistry. (3 credit hours.)
      • A continuation of CHEM-C 125 with emphasis on: equilibria; qualitative analysis; acids and bases; and oxidation reduction, including electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and synthesis. (2 credit hours.)
    • 2 course sequence:
      • P: CHEM-C 101 and CHEM-C 121; or CHEM-C 103; or chemistry and math placement examinations and consent of the department. Lecture course covering basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry, basic mathematical and conceptual principles in atomic structure and periodic properties, molecular structure, chemical bonding, energy (thermochemistry), kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics. Credit given for only one of the following: CHEM-C 105, CHEM-C 117, CHEM-J 117, or CHEM-S 117. (3 credit hours.)
      • P or C: CHEM-C 117 or CHEM-J 117. Basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry that align with the topics in CHEM-C 117. Chemical bonding (atomic structure, molecular structure, molecular orbital theory, and non-covalent interactions), macroscopic properties (energy, kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics). Hands-on laboratory techniques in chemistry necessary for success in later chemistry laboratory courses, especially organic chemistry. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 125 or CHEM-C 127. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 117 and CHEM-C 127; or CHEM-J 117 and CHEM-C 127; or CHEM-C 105 and CHEM-C 125; or CHEM-S 117. An integrated lecture-laboratory course building on principles from CHEM-C 117. Topics include solutions, equilibria, electrochemistry, nuclear reactions, and transition metals. Additional topics may include polymers, drug design, and atmospheric chemistry. Course focuses on application-based problem solving. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 106 and CHEM-C 126; CHEM-C 118; or CHEM-N 330. (5 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 117, CHEM-C 243, CHEM-J 117, or CHEM-S 117. Chemistry of carbon compounds. Nomenclature; qualitative theory of valence; structure and reactions. Syntheses and reactions of major classes of monofunctional compounds. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 341, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 341. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 341, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 341 with a grade of C- or higher. Syntheses and reactions of polyfunctional compounds, natural and industrial products. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 341, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 341; and CHEM-C 342, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 342. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: A grade of C- or higher in CHEM-C 127; and CHEM-C 341, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 341. R: CHEM-C 342 or CHEM-S 342. Laboratory instruction in the fundamental techniques of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and the use of general synthetic methods. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 343 and CHEM-S 343. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 342 or CHEM-S 342; and CHEM-C 343 or CHEM-S 343. Preparation, isolation, and identification of organic compounds; emphasis on modern research methods. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 342, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 342. Introduction to structure, chemical properties, and interrelationships of biological substances. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 483; or CHEM-C 484 and CHEM-C 485. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 484. Biosynthetic pathways, control of metabolism, and drug design. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 483; or CHEM-C 484 and CHEM-C 485. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: CHEM-C 342, CHEM-R 340, or CHEM-S 342 with a grade of C- or higher. R: CHEM-C 343 or CHEM-S 343. An integrated lecture-laboratory course covering structure and bonding of inorganic compounds, including transition metal coordination compounds, organometallic compounds, and bioinorganic complexes. Further topics will include nuclear chemistry and reaction mechanisms. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 106 and CHEM-C 126; CHEM-C 118; or CHEM-N 330. (5 credit hours.)
    • PHSL-P 416
    • PHSL-P 417
  7. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 9 credit hours in the certificate must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 9 credit hours in the certificate must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the certificate.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the certificate—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to certificate requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.