Majors, minors + certificates

Minor in Polish StudiesStudents on Summer 2018, Fall 2018, or Spring 2019 requirements (POLISTMIN)Russian and East European Institute

Minor requirements

The minor requires at least 18 credit hours (Students must take courses in three (3) different departments), including the requirements listed below.

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  1. Polish Language. One (1) course from the Polish Language list.
    • SLAV-P 202 Intermediate Polish II P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-P 201 or equivalent. Continuation of SLAV-P 201. Credit given for only one of SLAV-P 202, SLAV-P 222, or SLAV-P 314. (3 credit hours.)
    • SLAV-P 301 Advanced Intermediate Polish I P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-P 202 or equivalent. Morphological, lexical, and syntactical analysis of a broad spectrum of textual materials with special emphasis on meaning. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension. (3 credit hours.)
    • SLAV-P 302 Advanced Intermediate Polish II P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-P 301 or equivalent. Morphological, lexical, and syntactical analysis of a broad spectrum of textual materials with special emphasis on meaning. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension. (3 credit hours.)
    • SLAV-P 473 Fourth-Year Polish I Refinement of active and passive language skills, with emphasis on vocabulary building and word usage.  Extensive readings, discussion, composition writing.  Individualized remedial drill in grammar and pronunciation. (3 credit hours.)
    • SLAV-P 474 Fourth-Year Polish II Refinement of active and passive language skills, with emphasis on vocabulary building and word usage.  Extensive readings, discussion, composition writing.  Individualized remedial drill in grammar and pronunciation. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Core Courses. Nine (9) credit hours from the Core Courses list.
    • HIST-D 201 Democratic Revolutions since 1980 In recent decades democratically-oriented revolutions have occurred in Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union, Latin America, Africa, East and Southeast Asia, and the Middle East. What accounts for this phenomenon? What common ideas and practices link them? Why were some more successful than others? (3 credit hours.)
    • POLS-Y 340 East European Politics Compares political change in the East European states, and emphasizes the legacies of authoritarianism and communism and the post-communist transition to democracy. Topics include the building of political institutions, the inclusion of citizens into the polity, the reform of the economy, the management of ethnic and social conflicts, and integration into the European Union. (3 credit hours.)
    • SLAV-P 223 Introduction to Polish Culture Survey of Polish culture from the origins of the Polish state to modern times. Important historical, political, and social developments and trends as seen through literature, art, science, music, architecture, and political documents. Knowledge of Polish not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • SLAV-P 363 Faces of War and Freedom Polish literature and culture from the nineteenth century to World War II in its turbulent historical and sociopolitical context. Special attention will be given to cultural representations of historical upheavals and the analysis of literary and artistic strategies of responding to the conditions of foreign occupation, colonization, and genocide. Knowledge of Polish language and culture not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • SLAV-P 364 From Anxiety To Revolution Polish literature and culture from the end of World War II to the present day in the context of Poland's and Europe's historical and sociopolitical transformations. The main focus will be on literary and artistic representations of the shifting landscape of Polish culture. Students will analyze literature, film, and the arts, and interpret wide-ranging expressions of existential, aesthetic, and social anxieties and contestations. Knowledge of Polish language and culture not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • SLAV-P 365 Topics in Polish Literature and Culture Focus on Polish literature and culture with comparisons to other world literatures and cultures; intensive study of an author, a period, or a literary or cultural development. Readings and lectures in English. No previous knowledge of Polish literature or culture required. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • SLAV-P 366 The Bold and the Restless: Polish Film from the 1950s to the Present An exploration of the post-World War II history of Polish cinema, made famous worldwide by directors such as Wajda, Kieslowski, and Polanski. Topics of interest include the cinema of moral anxiety (1970s); absurd comedies depicting life under communism; adaptations of literary classics; and new topics and genres in contemporary Polish film. (3 credit hours.)
    • Independent readings course approved by the Institute (up to 3 credit hours)
    • Additional course(s) that focus predominantly on Poland, with approval of the Institute
  3. Related Electives.
    • Approved Courses. Any of the following Approved Electives (no additional approval required):
      • ANTH-E 412 Anthropology of Russia and Eastern Europe Explores the contradictory effects of socialism's "fall" through a study of new ethnographies of postsocialist societies. Regional inquiries will be related to broader intellectual issues such as globalization, social suffering, commodification and cultural identity, ethnicity and nation building, armed conflict, and gender inequalities. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-B 323 History of the Holocaust Anti-Semitism in imperial and Weimar Germany; the Nazi rise to power; the destruction of European Jewry; Jewish behavior in crisis and extremity; the attitude of the Allied nations; mass murder in comparative historical perspective; theological, moral, and political implications. Credit given for only one of HIST-B 323 or JSTU-J 323. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-D 200 Issues in Russian/East European History Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-D 300 Issues in Russian/East European History Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-D 304 Jews of Eastern Europe Study of the history of Jewish life in Eastern Europe. Topics to be discussed will include Hasidism, Kabbalah, shtetl life, Haskalah (the Jewish Enlightenment), Socialism, Yiddish literary traditions, and the Holocaust. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-D 327 The Habsburg Empire, 1780-1918: Nation-Building and Imperial Decline Enlightened despotism; Metternichian system; struggle for German unification; Habsburg culture and civilization. German-Austrian, Hungarian, Czechoslovak, South Slavic, Rumanian, and Polish nationalism. Industrialization; Christian socialism and Austro-Marxism; murder at Sarajevo; destruction of the empire; its legacy to Europe. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 327 or HIST-D 427. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-D 329 Eastern Europe 1900—1943 Begins around 1900 with twilight of great empires (Russian, Prussian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian), exploring origins of modern eastern Europe, the “rebirth” of Eastern Europe after WWI; wild 1920s; polarizing ideological spectrum of the 1930s; and dynamics of communism and fascism. Given the spectre of WWII, this course will pose the question of whether and how we can read the interwar years in a way other than as a prelude to an inevitable catastrophe to come. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 328, HIST-D 329, or HIST-D 428. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-D 330 Eastern Europe 1944—Present Examines origins of communism in Eastern Europe, brutal takeover and Stalinization, attempts to reform communism, the fall of communism and ensuing battles for privatization, democratization, and the Wars in Yugoslavia. Looks at political institutions that shaped communist and post-communist Eastern Europe and important social and cultural developments. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 328, HIST-D 330, or HIST-D 428. (3 credit hours.)
      • REEI-R 303 Eastern Europe, Past and Present Interdisciplinary study of the geography, natural resources, peoples, religions, economy, political and social systems, education, law, cultures, literatures, and arts of East Central and Southeastern Europe. Emphasis on recent developments with appropriate attention to historical roots. (3 credit hours.)
      • SLAV-R 353 Central European Cinema Broad cultural overview of Central European cinema, highlighting major developments of cinema in Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, and the former Republics of Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia in the post-Stalin era. Special attention will be given to the individual style and aesthetics of several major film directors. (3 credit hours.)
    • Potential Courses. The following courses may be applied to the minor with approval of the Institute. Students are expected to provide evidence that some portion of the course, including written work, dealt with Poland, alone or comparatively. Similarly, students may present evidence of Polish-related work in other courses not listed here. Potential Course list.
      • ANTH-E 387 The Ethnography of Europe Europe is viewed as an idea, an identity, and an historical consciousness. Students explore the meaning of this idea in the contemporary development of social and cultural anthropology, and in such social areas as regionalism and nationalism, ethnic identity, gender and kinship, religion, the city versus the village, and political life. (3 credit hours.)
      • CMLT-C 377 Topics in Yiddish Literature R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Selected topics focusing on Yiddish fiction and drama (1810-1914) or twentieth-century Yiddish fiction, drama, and poetry. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of CMLT-C 377 and GER-E 351. (3 credit hours.)
      • CMLT-C 378 Topics in Yiddish Culture R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Selected topics on history of Ashkenazic Jews; Old Yiddish and premodern Yiddish folklore and popular culture; history and sociology of Yiddish; modern Yiddish culture; and centers of modern Yiddish culture. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of CMLT-C 378 and GER-E 352. (3 credit hours.)
      • FOLK-F 312 European Folklore/Folklife/Folk Music Expressions of regional cultures and emerging nations of Europe. Social functions of folklore and folk music in rural and urban communities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • GEOG-G 428 Geography of Europe Emphasizes common themes across the countries of Europe and the distinctive cultures that make up the region. Begins with a discussion of the physical landscape of Europe, then explores the cultural and economic landscape of the region. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-B 303 Issues in Modern European History Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in modern European history (1750–present). Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-B 315 European Anti-Semitism from the Enlightenment to the Holocaust Examines the origins, character, and development of anti-Semitism from the Enlightenment to the post-Holocaust period. Asks whether anti-Semitism is a single phenomenon with a clear tradition and cause, or whether it has varied markedly over time and from country to country. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-B 321 European Jews in the Age of Discovery Jewish history from 1492 to 1789. Topics include the expulsion from Spain; the Inquisition and the marranos; the society and culture of Italian, Turkish, and Polish Jewry; Court Jews in central Europe; Hasidism in eastern Europe; the Enlightenment; Jews and the French Revolution. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-B 322 Jews in the Modern World Topics include Emancipation, the Jewish Enlightenment, modern Judaism, Eastern European Jewry, Jewish politics, women in Jewish society, American Jewry, the Holocaust, Israel. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-B 361 Europe in the Twentieth Century I Economic, social, political, and military-diplomatic developments, 1900 to present. I: 1900–1930: origins, impact, and consequences of World War I; peacemaking; postwar problems; international communism and fascism; the Great Depression. II: 1930–present: Depression politics; crisis of democracy; German national socialism; World War II; Cold War; postwar reconstruction and recovery. (3 credit hours.)
      • HIST-B 362 Europe in the Twentieth Century II Economic, social, political, and military-diplomatic developments, 1900 to present. I: 1900–1930: origins, impact, and consequences of World War I; peacemaking; postwar problems; international communism and fascism; the Great Depression. II: 1930–present: Depression politics; crisis of democracy; German national socialism; World War II; Cold War; postwar reconstruction and recovery. (3 credit hours.)
      • INTL-I 203 Global Development Focuses on the interaction between social, political, and economic forces and human development at global, national, and subnational scales; introduces theoretical perspectives on economic development and the function of markets. (3 credit hours.)
      • INTL-I 300 Topics in International Studies This course focuses on the intensive study and analysis of selected international problems and issues within an interdisciplinary format. Topics will vary but will cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • POLS-Y 345 Comparative Revolutions Analysis of major modern revolutions. Focus on the social, economic, and political causes of revolutions; the rise of revolutionary movements; and the strategies for gaining and consolidating power. (3 credit hours.)
      • POLS-Y 348 The Politics of Genocide Comparative study of major twentieth-century genocides. Examines the political conditions, ideologies, and movements leading up to mass murder, and the ethnic and global context of genocide. Focuses on the question of responsibility and accountability from the viewpoints of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders in the national and international communities. (3 credit hours.)
      • POLS-Y 350 Politics of the European Union Study of the politics of the European Union (EU). Assesses past and present dynamics of economic and political integration in Europe, the structure and work of European Union institutions, and EU public policies such as the Single Market, the common currency, common foreign and security policy, and trade. (3 credit hours.)
      • POLS-Y 352 The Holocaust and Politics Examination of the socioeconomic conditions and political ideologies leading up to the Holocaust, and the political, administrative, and social context for the genocide from the vantage of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders. Focus on the individual, national, and international responses to and responsibilities for the Holocaust. Consideration of the Holocaust's legacies for the postwar world. (3 credit hours.)
      • REEI-R 300 Russian and East European Issues Brief examination of selected topics related to Russia and East Europe. Variable topics. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 6 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
      • REEI-R 301 Russian and East European Area Topics Selected topics related to politics, culture, economics, and society in the Russian and East European area. (3 credit hours.)
      • REEI-X 490 Readings in Russian and East European Studies P: Consent of instructor and the director of the Russian and East European Institute. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in REEI-R 495 and REEI-X 490. (1–3 credit hours.)