Majors, minors + certificates

Minor in Russian and East European Studies with Language Certification (REELNGMIN)Russian and East European Institute

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The minor indicates that students have achieved special competence in the Russian and East European area, successfully completing interdisciplinary area coursework. The minor in Russian and East European studies requires Distribution courses in three disciplinary groupings.

Minor requirements

The minor requires at least 21 credit hours (Students must complete coursework selected in consultation with the REEI undergraduate advisor.), including the requirements listed below.

  1. Language. Two (2) courses and six (6) credit hours from the .
    • Central Eurasian Studies
    • P: CEUS-T 104 or CEUS-U 112 with a grade of C or higher; or consent of department. Builds on skills acquired in introductory courses. First year topics are reviewed in more detail and new topics, such as seasons, holidays, traditions, and customs are added. Longer reading texts are introduced. Video materials train listening comprehension. Development of conversation skills beyond the structured exchanges of the introductory level. Credit given for only one of CEUS-T 203 or CEUS-U 211. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CEUS-T 203 or CEUS-U 211 with a grade of C or higher; or consent of department. Finishes covering Estonian structures (morphology and syntax) and develops skills by reading, conversation, discussion, oral presentations, a weekly journal and short essays, and listening. Materials used to introduce Estonian culture include current press sources (print and Internet), short fiction, poetry, documentaries, feature films, and news programs. Credit given for only one of CEUS-T 204 or CEUS-U 212. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CEUS-T 142 or CEUS-U 132 with a grade of C or higher; or consent of department. Helps students converse more fluently about personal and simple academic topics, articulate feelings and opinions, read short literary and scholarly texts, and write for basic personal, business, and academic purposes. Authentic texts and video teach about the lifestyle and socio-historical facts of Hungary. Credit given for only one of CEUS-T 241 or CEUS-U 231. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: CEUS-T 241 or CEUS-U 231 with a grade of C or higher; or consent of department. Helps students converse more fluently about personal and simple academic topics, articulate their feelings and opinions, read short literary and scholarly texts, and write for basic personal, business, and academic purposes. Authentic texts and video teach about Hungary. Moderately complex grammatical forms are introduced. Credit given for only one of CEUS-T 242 or CEUS-U 232. (4 credit hours.)
    • Germanic Studies
    • P: GER-Y 150 or consent of instructor. Development of speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. Review of basic grammar and study of new grammatical topics. Reading of short fictional texts and other writings on Jewish culture. Taught in alternate years. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: GER-Y 200 or consent of instructor. Continuing development of active and passive skills. Additional new grammar concepts. Emphasis on development of reading skills and cultural knowledge through literary and journalistic texts including texts in nonstandardized orthographies. Taught in alternate years. (3 credit hours.)
    • Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-C 102 or equivalent. Continuation of work in structure and vocabulary acquisition through written exercises, study of word formation, drills, reading and discussion of short texts. Credit given for only one of SLAV-C 201, SLAV-C 211, or SLAV-C 313. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-C 201 or equivalent. Continuation of SLAV-C 201. Credit given for only one of SLAV-C 202, SLAV-C 222, or SLAV-C 314. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-C 202 or equivalent. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension in Czech language based on morphological, lexical, and syntactical analysis of contemporary textual materials. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-C 301. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension in Czech language based on morphological, lexical, and syntactical analysis of contemporary textual materials. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-M 102 or equivalent. Continuation of work in structure and vocabulary acquisition through written exercises, study of word formation, drills, reading, and discussion of short stories. Credit given for only one of SLAV-M 201, SLAV-M 211, or SLAV-M 313. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-M 201 or equivalent. Continuation of SLAV-M 201. Credit given for only one of SLAV-M 202, SLAV-M 222, or SLAV-M 314. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-R 102, SLAV-N 112 or SLAV-N 122, or equivalent proficiency. Intensive summer equivalent of SLAV-R 201. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 221, SLAV-N 231, or SLAV-R 201. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-R 102, SLAV-N 112 or SLAV-N 122, or equivalent proficiency. Intensive summer equivalent of R201. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 231, SLAV-N 221, or SLAV-R 201. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-N 221, SLAV-N 231, or SLAV-R 201, or equivalent proficiency. Intensive summer equivalent of SLAV-R 202. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 232, SLAV-N 242, or SLAV-R 202. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-N 221, SLAV-N 231, SLAV-R 201, or equivalent proficiency. Intensive summer equivalent of SLAV-R 202. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 232, SLAV-N 242, or SLAV-R 202. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-N 232, SLAV-N 242, or SLAV-R 202; or equivalent proficiency. Intensive summer equivalent of SLAV-R 301. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 341, SLAV-N 351, or SLAV-R 301. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-N 232, SLAV-N 242, or SLAV-R 202; or equivalent proficiency. Intensive summer equivalent of SLAV-R 301. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 341, SLAV-N 351, or SLAV-R 301. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-N 341, SLAV-N 351, or SLAV-R 301; or equivalent proficiency. Intensive summer equivalent of SLAV-R 302. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 352, SLAV-N 362, or SLAV-R 302. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-N 341, SLAV-N 351, or SLAV-R 301; or equivalent proficiency. Intensive summer equivalent of SLAV-R 302. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 352, SLAV-N 362, or SLAV-R 302. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-N 352, SLAV-N 362, or SLAV-R 302; or equivalent proficiency. Intensive summer equivalent of SLAV-R 401. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 461, SLAV-N 471, or SLAV-R 401. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-N 352, SLAV-N 362, or SLAV-R 302; or equivalent proficiency. Intensive summer equivalent of SLAV-R 401. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 461, SLAV-N 471, or SLAV-R 401. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-N 461, SLAV-N 471, or SLAV-R 401; or equivalent proficiency. Intensive summer equivalent of SLAV-R 402. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 472 or SLAV-R 402. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-P 102 or equivalent. Continuation of work in structure and vocabulary acquisition through written exercises, study of word formation, drills, reading, and discussion of short stories. Credit given for only one of SLAV-P 201, SLAV-P 211, or SLAV-P 313. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-P 201 or equivalent. Continuation of SLAV-P 201. Credit given for only one of SLAV-P 202, SLAV-P 222, or SLAV-P 314. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-P 202 or equivalent. Morphological, lexical, and syntactical analysis of a broad spectrum of textual materials with special emphasis on meaning. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-P 301 or equivalent. Morphological, lexical, and syntactical analysis of a broad spectrum of textual materials with special emphasis on meaning. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension. (3 credit hours.)
    • Refinement of active and passive language skills, with emphasis on vocabulary building and word usage.  Extensive readings, discussion, composition writing.  Individualized remedial drill in grammar and pronunciation. (3 credit hours.)
    • Refinement of active and passive language skills, with emphasis on vocabulary building and word usage.  Extensive readings, discussion, composition writing.  Individualized remedial drill in grammar and pronunciation. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-R 102 or equivalent. Continuation of work in structure and vocabulary acquisition through study of grammar, drills, and readings. Oral practice and written exercises. Credit given for only one of SLAV-R 201, SLAV-N 221, SLAV-N 231, SLAV-W 303, or SLAV-W 352. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-R 201 or equivalent. Continuation of work in structure and vocabulary acquisition through study of grammar, drills, and readings. Oral practice and written exercise. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 232, SLAV-N 242, SLAV-R 202, SLAV-W 304 or SLAV-W 353. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-R 202 or equivalent. C: SLAV-R 325 or consent of department. Morphological, lexical, and syntactic analysis of a broad spectrum of textual materials with special emphasis on meaning. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension. Remedial grammar and phonetics as required. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 341, SLAV-N 351, SLAV-R 301, SLAV-W 305, or SLAV-W 354. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-R 301 or equivalent. C: SLAV-R 326 or consent of department. Morphological, lexical, and syntactic analysis of a broad spectrum of textual materials with special emphasis on meaning. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension. Remedial grammar and phonetics as required. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 352, SLAV-N 362, SLAV-R 302, SLAV-W 306, or SLAV-W 355. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: SLAV-R 202 or consent of the department. Designed primarily for those interested in developing oral fluency. Sections in advanced conversation, recitation, and oral comprehension, supplemented by lab and drill in corrective pronunciation, dictation, and reading. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours. (1 credit hour.)
    • P: SLAV-R 301 or SLAV-R 325, or consent of the department. Continuation and advanced treatment of topics covered in SLAV-R 325, as well as themes relating to current events. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours. (1 credit hour.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-R 302 or equivalent. Refinement of active and passive language skills, with emphasis on vocabulary building and word usage. Extensive reading, discussion, composition writing. Individualized remedial drill in grammar and pronunciation aimed at preparing students to meet departmental language proficiency standards. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 461, SLAV-N 471, SLAV-R 401, SLAV-W 307, or SLAV-W 356. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-R 401 or equivalent. Refinement of active and passive language skills, with emphasis on vocabulary building and word usage. Extensive reading, discussion, composition writing. Individualized remedial drill in grammar and pronunciation aimed at preparing students to meet departmental language proficiency standards. Credit given for only one of SLAV-N 472, SLAV-R 402, or SLAV-W 357. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: SLAV-R 302 or consent of the department. Designed primarily for those interested in maintaining or developing oral fluency. Sections in advanced conversation, recitation and oral comprehension, dictation, and reading. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours. (1 credit hour.)
    • P: SLAV-R 401 or SLAV-R 425; or consent of the department. Continuation of SLAV-R 425. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours. (1 credit hour.)
    • P: Placement above third year or consent of instructor. Students will develop advanced language skills with a focus on international relations, economics, trade, national security, and arms control. Students will be exposed to such authentic materials as newspaper articles and audio excerpts from news broadcasts. Course goal is to develop functional proficiency in all basic language skills: reading, listening, speaking. Grammar review is part of the course. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-S 102 or equivalent. Continuation of work in structure and vocabulary acquisition through written exercises, study of word formation, drills, reading and discussion of short stories. Credit given for only one of SLAV-S 201, SLAV-S 211, or SLAV-S 313. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C or higher in SLAV-S 201 or equivalent. Continuation of SLAV-S 201: work in structure and vocabulary acquisition through study of grammar, drills, and readings. Oral practice and written exercise. Credit given for only one of SLAV-S 202, SLAV-S 222, or SLAV-S 314. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-S 202 or equivalent results on placement exam. Morphological, lexical, and syntactic analysis of a broad spectrum of textual materials with special emphasis on meaning. Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension. Remedial grammar and phonetics as required. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of B or higher in SLAV-S 301 or equivalent result on placement exam. Reading of literary texts from a variety of periods and locations in the Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian speech area. Sequence of readings in original parallels syllabus of SLAV-S 363 and SLAV-S 364 in translation. Review of grammar, syntax, and expansion of lexicon as needed. (3 credit hours.)
  2. History and Geography. One (1) course from the .
    • Central Eurasian Studies
    • P: Freshman or sophomore standing; or consent of department. Introduction to the history of the traditional Central Eurasian ("Inner Asian") peoples through lecture and film. Topics include Proto-Indo-Europeans, Silk Road, Attila, steppe empires, Dalai Lama, Manchu and Russian relations, and the re-emergence of Central Eurasia in the late twentieth century. Extensive use of films. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 191 or CEUS-U 190. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for introductory topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 199 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to Hungary, Estonia, and Finland, three European nations whose peoples speak unique Uralic languages. Covers their culture and history as shaped by their Uralic heritage and by Germanic, Turkish, and Slavic conquerors. Focuses on national awakenings, independence, communism, and their role in Europe today. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for intermediate topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 299 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • In-depth study of modern Finnish history, stressing Russification; 1905 Revolution; independence; interwar period, the Winter War and the Continuation War; "Finlandization," economic miracle, and welfare state; changing role of women; Finland as part of Scandinavia; literature, art, and music; and membership in the European Union. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Baltic-Finnish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Explores Central Asia's role in world history, in Islam, and as a link between East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe. Readings in English translation. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Surveys Islam and Muslim communities in areas of the former U.S.S.R. After basic coverage of Islam, Russian expansion, and their interaction, the course focuses on the pressures experienced by and exerted by Islam as a religion and socio-cultural system, with attention to religious life's adaptations to the Soviet and post-Soviet context. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 313 or CEUS-U 394. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Central Asian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Europe's largest minority, the so-called "Gypsies," more properly the Roma, have been killed, hunted, and reviled; yet the exotic flavoring of "Gypsiness" has fascinated writers, artists, and composers. Surveys Roma history and representations. No background in East European studies, music, or film is required; readings are in English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Variable title course for topics in Hungarian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Examines Mongolia's turbulent history from independence from China's last dynasty in 1911 through theocracy, revolution, and communism to today's market democracy. Also focuses on social, economic, cultural, and demographic changes. No prerequisite. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 360 or CEUS-U 469. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Mongolian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Traces the Ottoman Empire from its beginnings to its height under Suleyman the Magnificent. Themes include Turks before the empire, Asia Minor before the Turks, rival principalities, centralization, Ottomans as European and Middle Eastern, economy, society, religion, law, learning, ethnic/cultural diversity, and the "classical age" as a concept. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Turkish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) In-depth exploration of Chinggis Khan's Mongol Empire from its origins in the twelfth century in the continent-wide breakdown of the 1330s-1370s. Primary sources (Mongolian, Chinese, Middle Eastern, and European) in translation, including many of the medieval era's greatest histories and travelogues. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 393 or CEUS-U 368. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topic in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 399 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Survey of Russia and Central Asia's complex relations, covering Russian expansion in the sixteenth century, Russian conquest in the nineteenth century, socio-political developments, and the emergence of modern nations in the 1920s. Themes include mechanism of Empire, dynamics between conqueror and conquered, and colonial administration of Islamic peoples. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 412 or CEUS-U 494. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Surveys Islamic Central Asia from the sixteenth century to the Russian conquest, especially Chinggisid Uzbek states and the "tribal" dynasties, but also East Turkestan to 1755, and nomadic Qasaqs, Qirghiz, Turkmens. Themes include political institutions, legitimation, nomads and sedentaries; ethnic developments; religion and culture; sources and historiography. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 413 or CEUS-U 493. (3 credit hours.)
    • College of Arts and Sciences
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 104 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the social and historical studies Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 104 or COLL-S 104. (3 credit hours.)
    • Collins Living-Learning Center
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • European Studies, Institute for
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected ideas, trends, and problems in contemporary Europe from the perspective of social and behavioral sciences. Specific topics will be announced each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Geography
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) What do bananas, the 1979 Islamic Revolution, and drone warfare have in common? How do economic development, geopolitics, and resource extraction shape current events? Answers to these and other questions are used to explain the roots of contemporary global events. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines the geography of the Caucuses and North Central Asia. Focuses on general issues, such as the challenges posed by living in Russia's shadow, environmental degradation and political identity, before turning to an examination of each country. (3 credit hours.)
    • Geographic problems and prospects of the former republics of the Soviet Union with an emphasis on political geography, environmental issues, population, urbanization, energy, and the location of economic activity. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Emphasizes common themes across the countries of Europe and the distinctive cultures that make up the region. Begins with a discussion of the physical landscape of Europe, then explores the cultural and economic landscape of the region. (3 credit hours.)
    • Global and International Studies, School of
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of global issues relating to security, protests, and media. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of international and global issues relating to politics, security, media and health. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Provides academic structure to undergraduate students who wish to engage in a work experience through participation in internships domestically or internationally. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • History
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems across more than one period of Western European history. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in modern European history (1750–present). Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines the origins, character, and development of anti-Semitism from the Enlightenment to the post-Holocaust period. Asks whether anti-Semitism is a single phenomenon with a clear tradition and cause, or whether it has varied markedly over time and from country to country. (3 credit hours.)
    • Anti-Semitism in imperial and Weimar Germany; the Nazi rise to power; the destruction of European Jewry; Jewish behavior in crisis and extremity; the attitude of the Allied nations; mass murder in comparative historical perspective; theological, moral, and political implications. Credit given for only one of HIST-B 323 or JSTU-J 323. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to main events and issues in Russian history from earliest times to the Crimean War in the mid-nineteenth century. Covers foundation of a great Slavic state into the Eurasian plain, the Kievan era of early state building, colorful rulers such as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 101, HIST-D 102, or HIST-H 261. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to main events and issues in Russian history from the middle of the nineteenth century to present. Covers the great liberating reforms of Tsar Alexander II, the last tsar, Nicholas II, the revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin, the brutal tyrant Joseph Stalin, and the last Communist leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 101, HIST-D 103, or HIST-H 261. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) In recent decades democratically-oriented revolutions have occurred in Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union, Latin America, Africa, East and Southeast Asia, and the Middle East. What accounts for this phenomenon? What common ideas and practices link them? Why were some more successful than others? (3 credit hours.)
    • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • The revolution in Soviet politics, culture, and daily life wrought by Mikhail Gorbachev (1986–1991) and the end of the Soviet Empire. Examination of selected issues: political structures, family, education, youth, status of women and minorities. Historical roots traced. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 302 or REEI-R 302. (3 credit hours.)
    • Biographies of a number of Russia’s most colorful personalities and the times in which they lived; among them, Ivan the Terrible, Pugachev, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Bakunin, Tolstoy, Lenin, Trotsky, Stalin. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of the history of Jewish life in Eastern Europe. Topics to be discussed will include Hasidism, Kabbalah, shtetl life, Haskalah (the Jewish Enlightenment), Socialism, Yiddish literary traditions, and the Holocaust. (3 credit hours.)
    • Russian empire under Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Napoleon’s invasion, expansion across Asia into the Americas, nationalism, war, and revolution. Other topics include daily life of the common people, gender issues, religion, and the emergence of a modern industrial society. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 308 or HIST-D 409. (3 credit hours.)
    • Issues covered include Soviet politics and society on the eve of WWII, prewar diplomacy, the major battles of WWII on the Eastern Front, the Soviet “home front,” popular culture, and the impact of WWII on the Soviet Union and on the Soviet Union’s international position. (3 credit hours.)
    • Causes and development of Russian revolutions and civil war; Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin; purges, terror, economic development, society, and arts under Stalin; struggle against Hitler; scope and limits of de-Stalinization under Khrushchev; minorities, dissent, and life in the Soviet Union. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 310 or HIST-D 410. (3 credit hours.)
    • A history of one of the most neglected nations in European history, once the breadbasket of the Soviet Union and now one of the largest nations in Europe. Examines issues of national identity and national consciousness and explores the place of Ukraine in Eurasian history. (3 credit hours.)
    • Origin of the Hungarian people; settlement of the Danubian basin; adoption of Christianity; formation of Hungarian state; impact of western European civilization and economic system during Middle Ages and Renaissance; effect of Ottoman domination; Ottoman-Habsburg conflict; liberation of Hungary from Turkish rule. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 321 or HIST-D 421. (3 credit hours.)
    • Modernization and rebuilding of Hungary during Habsburg enlightened absolutism; age of reform and the revolution of 1848–1849; compromise of 1867; social and economic transformation of Hungary within the framework of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy; problems of a multinational state; World War I and collapse of historical Hungary. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 322 or HIST-D 422. (3 credit hours.)
    • Decline of the Ottoman Empire. Revolutionary traditions and movements; peasant societies and folk customs; literary and linguistic nationalism; Balkan irredentism. Formation of Serbian (Jugoslav), Greek, Rumanian, Bulgarian, Albanian, and Turkish national states. Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and British influence and imperialism in southeastern Europe and Near East. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 325 or HIST-D 425. (3 credit hours.)
    • Enlightened despotism; Metternichian system; struggle for German unification; Habsburg culture and civilization. German-Austrian, Hungarian, Czechoslovak, South Slavic, Rumanian, and Polish nationalism. Industrialization; Christian socialism and Austro-Marxism; murder at Sarajevo; destruction of the empire; its legacy to Europe. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 327 or HIST-D 427. (3 credit hours.)
    • Begins around 1900 with twilight of great empires (Russian, Prussian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian), exploring origins of modern eastern Europe, the “rebirth” of Eastern Europe after WWI; wild 1920s; polarizing ideological spectrum of the 1930s; and dynamics of communism and fascism. Given the spectre of WWII, this course will pose the question of whether and how we can read the interwar years in a way other than as a prelude to an inevitable catastrophe to come. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 328, HIST-D 329, or HIST-D 428. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines origins of communism in Eastern Europe, brutal takeover and Stalinization, attempts to reform communism, the fall of communism and ensuing battles for privatization, democratization, and the Wars in Yugoslavia. Looks at political institutions that shaped communist and post-communist Eastern Europe and important social and cultural developments. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 328, HIST-D 330, or HIST-D 428. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Topics include the origins of Judaism, Jewish life in ancient Israel and the Diaspora, Judaism and the origins of Christianity, Jewish society and culture under Christian and Muslim rule in the Middle Ages. Credit given for only one of HIST-H 251 or JSTU-J 251. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jewish history from early modern times to the present. Topics include Jewish daily life in early modern Europe and Ottoman Turkey, Jewish mysticism, Hasidism, Jewish emancipation, modern Judaism, anti-Semitism, the Holocaust, Zionism, the State of Israel, and the history of American Jewry. Credit given for only one of HIST-H 252 or JSTU-J 252. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The refinement of students’ skills as historians; will focus on the skills of writing, interpretation, historical reasoning, discussion, and research. May be repeated with a different topic and the authorization of the history undergraduate advisor for a total of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: HIST-J 300 or HIST-J 301. Normally limited to majors. Capstone course, generally taken in senior year. Students will discuss and analyze primary and/ or secondary sources and undertake a substantial project demonstrating mastery of the historian’s skills. Topics will vary. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jewish Studies
    • Topics include the origins of Judaism, Jewish life in ancient Israel and the Diaspora, Judaism and the origins of Christianity, Jewish society and culture under Christian and Muslim rule in the Middle Ages. Credit given for only one of HIST-H 251 or JSTU-J 251. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jewish history from early modern times to the present. Topics include Jewish daily life in early modern Europe and Ottoman Turkey, Jewish mysticism, Hasidism, Jewish emancipation, modern Judaism, anti-Semitism, the Holocaust, Zionism, the State of Israel, and the history of American Jewry. Credit given for only one of J252 or HIST-H 252. (3 credit hours.)
    • Anti-Semitism in the modern world; the Nazi rise to power; the destruction of European Jewry; Jewish behavior in crisis and extremity; the attitude of the Allied nations; mass murder in comparative historical perspective; anti-Semitism and racial thinking; collaboration, resistance, and rescue. Credit given for only one of JSTU-J 323 or HIST-B 323. (3 credit hours.)
    • Russian and East European Institute
    • (Can be used to meet the requirement for any of the 3 areas) Interdisciplinary study of the geography, natural resources, peoples, religions, economy, political and social systems, education, law, cultures, literatures, and arts of Russia. Emphasis on recent developments with appropriate attention to historical roots. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 302 or REEI-R 302. (3 credit hours.)
    • (Can be used to meet the requirement for any of the 3 areas) Interdisciplinary study of the geography, natural resources, peoples, religions, economy, political and social systems, education, law, cultures, literatures, and arts of East Central and Southeastern Europe. Emphasis on recent developments with appropriate attention to historical roots. (3 credit hours.)
    • Brief examination of selected topics related to Russia and East Europe. Variable topics. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 6 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
  3. Social Sciences. One (1) course from the .
    • Anthropology
    • Remembrance is analyzed as a cultural and social reality. Review of the theoretical literature on collective memory as it unfolds in written, narrative, visual, and audiovisual art; in architecture and monuments; in private and public ritual; in genealogy; and in the social experience of the body. (3 credit hours.)
    • Europe is viewed as an idea, an identity, and an historical consciousness. Students explore the meaning of this idea in the contemporary development of social and cultural anthropology, and in such social areas as regionalism and nationalism, ethnic identity, gender and kinship, religion, the city versus the village, and political life. (3 credit hours.)
    • General anthropological introduction to social institutions and cultural forms of the Arab countries of North Africa and the Near East, Israel, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, development of Islam and Muslim empires, traditional adaptive strategies, consequences of colonialism, independence and rise of nation-states, impact of modernization, changing conceptions of kinship, ethnicity, and gender. Credit given for only one of ANTH-E 397, CEUS-R 352, CEUS-U 397, or NELC-N 397. (3 credit hours.)
    • General anthropological introduction to societies and cultures of contemporary Muslim successor states of former Soviet Central Asia, Western China (Xinjiang), and Iran and Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, ethnohistory, traditional subsistence strategies, family, kinship, gender, sociopolitical organization, impact of colonial rule of tsarist and Soviet Russia and China, development of modern nation-states in Iran and Afghanistan, and dynamics of current conflicts and future prospects. Credit given for only one of ANTH-E 398, CEUS-R 316, or CEUS-U 398. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Intensive examination of selected topics in anthropology. Emphasis on analytic investigation and critical discussion. Topics vary. May be taken with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Explores the contradictory effects of socialism's "fall" through a study of new ethnographies of postsocialist societies. Regional inquiries will be related to broader intellectual issues such as globalization, social suffering, commodification and cultural identity, ethnicity and nation building, armed conflict, and gender inequalities. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Cross-cultural exploration of communication systems, ranging from face-to-face interaction to mediated forms of communication, with an emphasis on their cultural foundations and social organization. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in ANTH-E 415 and CMCL-C 415. (3 credit hours.)
    • This advanced seminar in medical anthropology focuses on theoretical approaches to understanding the body and notions of health, illness, and disease across cultures. Concentrates on interpretive and critical (political economy) approaches to issues of health and includes critical study of Western biomedicine. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Current issues in linguistic anthropology, designed to acquaint the student with readings and points of view not covered in the introductory courses. Topics such as languages of the world, variation in language, problems in linguistic structure, and culture and communication. Topic varies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Central Eurasian Studies
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for introductory topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 199 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for intermediate topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 299 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Variable title course for topics in Baltic-Finnish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • An introduction to Central Eurasia, especially the former Soviet Union, focusing on the 1980s and beyond. Main topics are politics, society, and economy; others include demography, Islam, women, and foreign policy. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 315 or CEUS-U 395. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Central Asian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Variable title course for topics in Hungarian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Mongolian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Turkish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Analyzes environmental and social conditions in the immense region of Northern and Central Eurasia (former Soviet Union). Covers general environmental and political situations; environmental transformation under Soviet rule; environmental and health problems; conclusions on current trends. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 394 or CEUS-U 374. (3 credit hours.)
    • Challenges the assumption that terms such as "Chinese," "Taiwanese," or "Kazakh" represent straightforward concepts. Via theories of identity, and careful attention to the history of China and Inner Asia, explores and explodes the association of identity and descent, language and ethnicity, citizenship and nationality. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topic in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 399 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Exploration of the roles of religious figures and institutions in sanctioning, exercising, and/or undermining political authority in Islamic Central Asia. Focuses on the political influence wielded by the local representatives of Islam's spiritual ideal, especially Sufi shaykhs and how they used their extraordinary socio-economic and political power. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 416 or CEUS-U 498. (3 credit hours.)
    • College of Arts and Sciences
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 104 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the social and historical studies Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 104 or COLL-S 104. (3 credit hours.)
    • Collins Living-Learning Center
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Criminal Justice
    • Roles of legal institutions and processes in social and cultural systems. Cross-cultural examination of the foundations and contexts of legal forms and content and their relation to social, economic, and political systems and institutions. Analysis of legal impact, legal change, and legal development. (3 credit hours.)
    • Interdisciplinary course examines how the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government are being influenced by the forces of transition. Analysis of Russian crime, including corruption, patterns of interpersonal violence, human trafficking, and drug use. Last section focuses on the Russian criminal justice system, including juvenile justice, policing, and prisons. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Intensive study and analysis of selected problems in criminal justice. Topics will vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Economics
    • P: ECON-E 321. Economic institutions, resource allocation mechanisms, incentives and decision-making in a Soviet-type economy; economics of transition to a market-oriented system. Particular attention is paid to price liberalization, development of the financial system, privatization of state-owned assets, opening to the world economy, and the role of private sector. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 386 or ECON-E 497. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: ECON-E 321; Additional prerequisites may be required depending on the seminar topic. Intensive study of a topic area in economics. Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ECON-S 201 or ECON-E 201; Honors student. Designed for students of superior ability. Covers same core material as ECON-E 202 and substitutes for ECON-E 202 as a prerequisite for other courses. (3 credit hours.)
    • European Studies, Institute for
    • A course with two interrelated parts. The first involves an analysis of the decision-making powers of the European Union (EU). This analysis then leads to a formal simulation of the EU. This course may be repeated for credit, for a maximum of 3 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected ideas, trends, and problems in contemporary Europe from the perspective of social and behavioral sciences. Specific topics will be announced each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Gender Studies
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Topical seminar in gender studies. Analysis of a particular issue or problem that has generated debate within gender-related scholarship in a particular discipline, or across several disciplines/fields of inquiry. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Global and International Studies, School of
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of global issues relating to security, protests, and media. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of international and global issues relating to politics, security, media and health. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Provides academic structure to undergraduate students who wish to engage in a work experience through participation in internships domestically or internationally. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Global Living-Learning Community
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Global Village director. Intermediate consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Global Village director. Intermediate consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Global Village director. Advanced consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study and analysis of intelligence in U.S. foreign policy and national security issues from 1776 to the present. A look at wartime and peacetime tactics, the Cold War, post–September 11th strategies, and both state and non-state threats. Examines shift to human intelligence, civil liberty issues, and foreign and domestic intelligence activities. (3 credit hours.)
    • Hutton Honors College
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focusing on topics in social and historical studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • International Studies
    • This introductory, interdisciplinary course exposes students to the various academic approaches essential to international studies and to the various concentrations that comprise the major. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Focuses on the interaction between social, political, and economic forces and human development at global, national, and subnational scales; introduces theoretical perspectives on economic development and the function of markets. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) This course focuses on the intensive study and analysis of selected international problems and issues within an interdisciplinary format. Topics will vary but will cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Advanced topics focusing on human rights discourse and the role international law, treaties and conventions play in addressing these rights globally. Topics are interdisciplinary in theory and method. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Advanced topics focusing on the development of the modern state and the role of international organizations in maintaining global security and promoting global governance. Addresses issues of political and cultural diplomacy and their effect in international disputes. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) This seminar will examine an international issue through a foreign perspective. Course readings and discussions will be conducted in a foreign language at an advanced level.  The seminar's objective is to expose participants to global problems utilizing non-U.S. sources. (1 credit hour.)
    • P: INTL-I 315. This required seminar is designed for senior majors who have completed all of the International Studies degree requirements to consolidate their studies. Students complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to their concentration. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of nationalism to explore how history, politics and culture conflict and converge in shaping multiple identities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Examines issues of international scope through service learning projects. Content varies with instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in INTL-I 435 and INTL-X 370. (3 credit hours.)
    • Political Science
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Examines countries around the world to investigate fundamental questions about politics. Topics include democratic development, promotion of economic prosperity, maintenance of security, and management of ethnic and religious conflict. Critical thinking skills encouraged. Cases for comparison include advanced industrialized democracies, communist and former communist countries, and developing countries. Credit given for only one of POLS-Y 107 and POLS-Y 217. (3 credit hours.)
    • Causes of war, nature and attributes of the state, imperialism, international law, national sovereignty, arbitration, adjudication, international organization, major international issues. Credit given for only one of POLS-Y 109 or POLS-Y 219. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Extensive analysis of selected contemporary political problems. Topics vary from semester to semester and are listed in the online May be repeated with different topics for 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Intensive examination of selected political topics for freshman and sophomore honors students. Emphasis on critical discussion and preparation of brief papers. May be repeated once for credit. (3 credit hours.)
    • Political process and government structure in the Russian state. Political institutions inherited from tsarist empire and the Soviet state (1917–1991), history of subsequent political reform. Political problems of ethnic conflict, creating democratic institutions, and of transition from socialism to market economy. (3 credit hours.)
    • Compares political change in the East European states, and emphasizes the legacies of authoritarianism and communism and the post-communist transition to democracy. Topics include the building of political institutions, the inclusion of citizens into the polity, the reform of the economy, the management of ethnic and social conflicts, and integration into the European Union. (3 credit hours.)
    • Comparative study of major twentieth-century genocides. Examines the political conditions, ideologies, and movements leading up to mass murder, and the ethnic and global context of genocide. Focuses on the question of responsibility and accountability from the viewpoints of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders in the national and international communities. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of the politics of the European Union (EU). Assesses past and present dynamics of economic and political integration in Europe, the structure and work of European Union institutions, and EU public policies such as the Single Market, the common currency, common foreign and security policy, and trade. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) May be taken alone or in conjunction with related political science courses. A course tied to simulations of international organizations such as the European Union, the United Nations, or the Organization of American States. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Examination of the socioeconomic conditions and political ideologies leading up to the Holocaust, and the political, administrative, and social context for the genocide from the vantage of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders. Focus on the individual, national, and international responses to and responsibilities for the Holocaust. Consideration of the Holocaust's legacies for the postwar world. (3 credit hours.)
    • Compares factors that influence foreign policy and the foreign policy process. Focuses on domestic or internal sources of foreign policy behavior, including impact of individual leaders, group decision-making processes, bureaucratic politics, ideology and political culture, historical experience, and type of political system. Classroom simulations are central to the course. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: POLS-Y 332. Behavior of Russia and U.S.S.R. in world affairs from 1945 to the present. Emphasis on impact of geographic assets and vulnerabilities, historical experience, domestic politics, and the changing international environment. (3 credit hours.)
    • The nature of war. Theories and evidence on the causes of war. Discussion of the ways in which war has been conceived and perceived across time and of methods employed to study the phenomenon of war. (3 credit hours.)
    • Theories about the interaction between the international economic and political systems are the subject of this course. Works from each of the main traditions—liberal, Marxist, and statist—will be assigned. Specific topics covered will include (among others): the politics of trade, aid, foreign investment, and international monetary affairs; theories of dependency and imperialism; the politics of international competition in specific industries; the stability/ instability of international economic regimes. (3 credit hours.)
    • An exposition and critical analysis of the major political philosophers and philosophical schools from Plato to Machiavelli. (3 credit hours.)
    • An exposition and critical analysis of the major political philosophers and philosophical schools from Machiavelli to the present. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Origins and evolution of the UN; principal UN bodies, how they operate and what they do; who finances the UN; controversies and voting patterns in the UN; attitudes toward the UN and debates within member countries regarding its role; impact of UN activities and programs (e.g., conflict resolution and mediation, peacekeeping and peace enforcement; nation building, development aid, weapons proliferation, human rights, health, environment). Credit given for only one of NELC-N 398 or POLS-Y 399. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Topic varies with the instructor and year; consult the online May be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (2–3 credit hours.)
    • Business, Kelley School of
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
    • Public and Environmental Affairs, School of
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
  4. Literature and Culture. One (1) course from the .
    • Art History
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) A survey of major styles and monuments in art and architecture from prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages. Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 101 or FINA-A 101. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Origins and development of the architecture, and especially the sculpture and painting, of the period from Constantine the Great (300 A.D.) to the fall of Constantinople in 1453 in the Byzantine East and the beginning of the Renaissance in the Latin West. Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 226 or FINA-A 226. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of major artists and styles in painting and sculpture from c. 1770 to 1900, emphasizing developments in France, England, and Germany. Topics include neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, and post-impressionism. Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 341 or FINA-A 341. (3 credit hours.)
    • Christian art as it developed in its first centuries within the Roman Empire (200-600). Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 421 or FINA-A 421. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Art and architecture of the Byzantine Empire (A.D. 600-1453). Consideration of materials from the core territories of the Byzantine world (Constantinople, Asia Minor, Greece), the Byzantine commonwealth of Orthodox lands (Kievan Rus, Serbia) and Western Europe (Sicily, Venice, Crusader states). Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 425 or FINA-A 425. (3 credit hours.)
    • Art, architecture and design of the first half of the twentieth century: cubism, futurism, German expressionism, Dada, constructivism, the Bauhaus, with emphasis on the central concepts of modernism and the avant-garde. Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 442 or FINA-A 442. (3 credit hours.)
    • Russian art from the twelfth century to the present. Emphasis on the period 1850 to the present: realism, the Slavic revival, symbolism, constructivism, and socialist realism. Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 480 or FINA-A 480. (3 credit hours.)
    • Central Eurasian Studies
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for introductory topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 199 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for intermediate topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 299 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Examination of major works of modern Finnish literature in translation. Themes include urbanization, industrialization, independence, the individual and society, alcoholism, "the sixties," role of women, and influence of fine arts, music, performing arts, and film. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Baltic-Finnish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Surveys Islam and Muslim communities in areas of the former U.S.S.R. After basic coverage of Islam, Russian expansion, and their interaction, the course focuses on the pressures experienced by and exerted by Islam as a religion and socio-cultural system, with attention to religious life's adaptations to the Soviet and post-Soviet context. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 313 or CEUS-U 394. (3 credit hours.)
    • Anthropology of former Soviet Central Asia and adjacent areas of Iran and Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, ethnohistory, subsistence traditions; kinship, gender, identities; religion; transformations under Russia, Iran, Afghanistan, and the war on terrorism. No previous knowledge presumed; background in anthropology helpful. Credit given for only one of ANTH-E 398, CEUS-R 316, or CEUS-U 398. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Central Asian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Europe's largest minority, the so-called "Gypsies," more properly the Roma, have been killed, hunted, and reviled; yet the exotic flavoring of "Gypsiness" has fascinated writers, artists, and composers. Surveys Roma history and representations. No background in East European studies, music, or film is required; readings are in English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Variable title course for topics in Hungarian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Ethnographic survey examines the social institutions and cultural forms in contemporary Middle Eastern societies (i.e., the Arab world, Israel, Turkey, Iran, and Afghanistan). Topics include ecology; Islam; pastoral nomadism; agriculture and cities; colonialism and nation-states; tribalism, ethnicity, and gender; and modernization, oil wealth, labor migration, and social unrest. Credit given for only one of ANTH-E 397, CEUS-R 352, CEUS-U 397, or NELC-N 397. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Mongolian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Turkish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Surveys the Uralic (Finno-Ugric and Samoyed) peoples of northern Europe and Siberia. Topics include their origins and history, traditional and modern cultures, ethnic and national identity, development and modernization, and political independence and Russian rule. Also covers interrelations among Uralic peoples in the modern era. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 392 or CEUS-U 370. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topic in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 399 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • College of Arts and Sciences
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 103 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the arts and humanities Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 103 or COLL-S 103. (3 credit hours.)
    • Collins Living-Learning Center
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Comparative Literature
    • R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. The rise of realism in nineteenth-century fiction and its development into naturalism and impressionism; the symbolist reaction in poetry; the reemergence of the drama as a major genre. Authors such as Dickens, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Mallarme, Ibsen, Hauptmann, Strindberg, Chekhov. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Study of literature by women from different ages and societies. Consideration of issues such as the relationship to literary tradition and cultural context, the creation of an authoritative voice, or the representation of women in literature. Course may focus on one genre or mode (such as drama, lyric, autobiography, or satire). (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Historical interrelations between literature and philosophy. Recent topics have included free will and the problem of evil; mysticism, criminality, and suffering; existentialism and the literature of the absurd. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Selected topics focusing on Yiddish fiction and drama (1810-1914) or twentieth-century Yiddish fiction, drama, and poetry. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of CMLT-C 377 and GER-E 351. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Selected topics on history of Ashkenazic Jews; Old Yiddish and premodern Yiddish folklore and popular culture; history and sociology of Yiddish; modern Yiddish culture; and centers of modern Yiddish culture. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of CMLT-C 378 and GER-E 352. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Specific problems concerning the relationship of two or more literatures or of literature and another area in the humanities. May be repeated twice. (3 credit hours.)
    • English
    • Jewish authors, such as I. B. Singer and Elie Wiesel; groups of authors, such as Holocaust writers and writers about the immigrant experience; or genres and themes. Topic will vary from semester to semester. (3 credit hours.)
    • Folklore and Ethnomusicology
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Expressions of regional cultures and emerging nations of Europe. Social functions of folklore and folk music in rural and urban communities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Studies of folk culture in relationship to other fields. Focuses on such interdisciplinary topics as folk culture in relationship to language, literature, psychology, history, religion, sociology, musicology, or anthropology. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Germanic Studies
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected topics focusing on Yiddish fiction and drama (1810–1914) or twentieth-century Yiddish fiction, drama, and poetry. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours for CMLT-C 377, GER-E 351, and GER-Y 300. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected topics on history of Ashkenazic Jews; Old Yiddish and premodern Yiddish folklore and popular culture; history and sociology of Yiddish; modern Yiddish culture; and centers of modern Yiddish culture. Conducted in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours for CMLT-C 378, and GER-E 352, GER-Y 350. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of instructor. Readings in Yiddish or English translations on a topic in Yiddish Culture. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours in GER-X 493 and GER-Y 495. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Global and International Studies, School of
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of global issues relating to security, protests, and media. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of international and global issues relating to politics, security, media and health. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Provides academic structure to undergraduate students who wish to engage in a work experience through participation in internships domestically or internationally. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Global Living-Learning Community
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Global Village director. Intermediate consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Hutton Honors College
    • (approved topic: "Literature of the Holocaust") Focuses on works of fiction and/or nonfiction that are distinctive of a particular time period, memorable event or occurrence, or location. Relevant monographs capture the essence of a specific era, happening, or the perspectives of people in a particular place. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focusing on topics in arts and humanities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jewish Studies
    • (approved topic: "Literature of the Holocaust") Selected arts and humanities topics and issues in Jewish studies. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Russian Jewish Writers") Selected arts and humanities topics and issues in Jewish studies. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Media School, The
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Media historiography, topics in national media history, national and international movements and trends. Topic varies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 420 and MSCH-F 420. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Junior/senior standing; or consent of instructor. Structure and function of international communication systems and barrier to flow of information among nations. Emphasis on gathering and disseminating information around the world. Study of the major newspapers of the world, international news agencies, and international broadcasting and satellite networks. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 448 or MSCH-J 448. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Junior/senior standing; or consent of instructor. American social-intellectual history integrated with the story of news media development, emphasizing the historical relationship of the mass media to American social, economic, and cultural patterns and developments. Origin, growth, shortcomings, and achievements of media. Impact of society on the media and vice versa. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 450 or MSCH-J 450. (3 credit hours.)
    • Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected works of Middle Eastern literature in relation to a singular cultural problem or theme. Topics will vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Religious Studies
    • Introduction to the doctrines, spirituality, and practice of Orthodox Christianity as expressed in various cultural and national contexts. Particular attention is paid to Orthodox asceticism, monasticism, parish life, theology, and religious rivalry within the confession. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Course on Judaism or consent of instructor. Special topics such as problems in Jewish mystical tradition, the nature of religious community, charismatic leadership, religious biography. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in REL-A 430 and REL-R 445. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Religious problems confronting Jews and Judaism in our own time: women and Judaism, the impact of the Holocaust on Judaism, contemporary views of Zionism, religious trends in American Judaism. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected topics and movements in religion. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures
    • Introduction to history, literature, visual arts, music, film, and theatre of the Czechs. (3 credit hours.)
    • A history of the Czech lands and their art, literature, and music from the ninth through the late nineteenth centuries. Some discussion of Slovak language and literature also included. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of Czech fiction and drama from World War II to the present. Some discussion of émigré literature also included. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Focus on either Czech or Central European literature and culture; intensive study of an author, a period, or a literary or cultural development. Readings and lectures in English. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of Polish culture from the origins of the Polish state to modern times. Important historical, political, and social developments and trends as seen through literature, art, science, music, architecture, and political documents. Knowledge of Polish not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Polish literature and culture from the nineteenth century to World War II in its turbulent historical and sociopolitical context. Special attention will be given to cultural representations of historical upheavals and the analysis of literary and artistic strategies of responding to the conditions of foreign occupation, colonization, and genocide. Knowledge of Polish language and culture not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Focus on Polish literature and culture with comparisons to other world literatures and cultures; intensive study of an author, a period, or a literary or cultural development. Readings and lectures in English. No previous knowledge of Polish literature or culture required. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • An exploration of the post-World War II history of Polish cinema, made famous worldwide by directors such as Wajda, Kieslowski, and Polanski. Topics of interest include the cinema of moral anxiety (1970s); absurd comedies depicting life under communism; adaptations of literary classics; and new topics and genres in contemporary Polish film. (3 credit hours.)
    • Masterpieces of Russian short fiction in a variety of literary modes, from the early nineteenth century to the present, with particular attention to Russian writers and works that have influenced the short story worldwide. Authors include Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Chekhov, Babel, and Nabokov. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of development of Russian culture and thought from medieval Russia to the present, as seen primarily through literature and the arts. No knowledge of Russian is necessary. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of Russian culture from the late Soviet period to the present. Concentration on three simultaneous dichotomies: anthropological versus artistic culture; nationalism and classic Russian themes versus Western and postmodern trends; and popular versus serious art, music, and literature. Knowledge of Russian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey, analysis, and origins of traditional Russian folk tales based on thematic and structural classifications. Various approaches and theories are introduced in analyzing and interpreting folk tales, e.g., structural, formalist, thematic, and psychological. Pagan mythology, customs, and rituals are viewed as the possible origins of folktales. Influence of folk tales in music, arts, and cinema. (3 credit hours.)
    • The golden age of the Russian novel; its social, cultural, and economic context; the flowering of art and music; the rise of the metropolis in association with poverty, alienation, quest for identity (both national and personal), as reflected in the romantic and realistic works of Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, and Dostoevsky. Knowledge of Russian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • 1880 to present, a period of profound political, social, and intellectual ferment: the Bolshevik Revolution, Civil War, collectivization, the Stalinist purges, World War II, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the rise of a “new” Russia. Knowledge of Russian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Two giants of world literature who have shaped not only modern cultural history but philosophy and politics as well. Major works of each author will be read within an international perspective. Knowledge of Russian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Development of Russian cinematography from 1896 to the present. Characteristic features of Soviet films; the theory and practice of filmmaking in the former Soviet Union; the Soviet and Russian cinema in its relationship to Russian literature and in the larger context of European cinema art. Knowledge of Russian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Broad cultural overview of Central European cinema, highlighting major developments of cinema in Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, and the former Republics of Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia in the post-Stalin era. Special attention will be given to the individual style and aesthetics of several major film directors. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: SLAV-R 302 or equivalent. R: SLAV-R 263, SLAV-R 264. Reading, in the original, of important Russian literary works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Discussion and analysis of the works. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: SLAV-R 302 or equivalent. Extensive translation from the original of selected works on Russian history, government, music, folklore, geography, culture. Discussion of both linguistic problems and content. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of the cultures of Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Albania, and Romania, concentrating on the modern period. Lectures and readings in English. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study and analysis of literary and cultural issues and problems in the Slavic studies area. Variable topics ranging from a study of a single novel or genre to selected themes of Slavic literature in their historical and cultural contexts. Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of literary and intellectual history of the South Slavs in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, with a special focus on the foundational ideology of nations and nationalism in this period. Readings and discussions in English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of the history and cultures of the Croats, Slovenes, Serbs, Macedonians, and Bulgarians from prehistory to the present. Readings and lectures in English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Selected topics from Slavic and East European literatures and cultures. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • An area studies exploration of the ways in which people of Central and East European heritage express and adapt their ethnic identities in a United States context. With departmental approval, may be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • An introductory course on the linguistic analysis of Slavic languages. With departmental approval, may be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of Ukrainian culture from Kyivan Rus to the present, including such diverse facets of Ukrainian culture as folklore, language, art, literature, and modern pop-culture. Readings are supplemented by documentaries, cartoons, and music. Knowledge of Ukrainian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jacobs School of Music
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
  5. Electives. Two (2) courses from the .
    • Central Eurasian Studies
    • P: Freshman or sophomore standing; or consent of department. Introduction to the history of the traditional Central Eurasian ("Inner Asian") peoples through lecture and film. Topics include Proto-Indo-Europeans, Silk Road, Attila, steppe empires, Dalai Lama, Manchu and Russian relations, and the re-emergence of Central Eurasia in the late twentieth century. Extensive use of films. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 191 or CEUS-U 190. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for introductory topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 199 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to Hungary, Estonia, and Finland, three European nations whose peoples speak unique Uralic languages. Covers their culture and history as shaped by their Uralic heritage and by Germanic, Turkish, and Slavic conquerors. Focuses on national awakenings, independence, communism, and their role in Europe today. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for intermediate topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 299 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • In-depth study of modern Finnish history, stressing Russification; 1905 Revolution; independence; interwar period, the Winter War and the Continuation War; "Finlandization," economic miracle, and welfare state; changing role of women; Finland as part of Scandinavia; literature, art, and music; and membership in the European Union. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Baltic-Finnish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Explores Central Asia's role in world history, in Islam, and as a link between East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe. Readings in English translation. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Surveys Islam and Muslim communities in areas of the former U.S.S.R. After basic coverage of Islam, Russian expansion, and their interaction, the course focuses on the pressures experienced by and exerted by Islam as a religion and socio-cultural system, with attention to religious life's adaptations to the Soviet and post-Soviet context. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 313 or CEUS-U 394. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Central Asian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Europe's largest minority, the so-called "Gypsies," more properly the Roma, have been killed, hunted, and reviled; yet the exotic flavoring of "Gypsiness" has fascinated writers, artists, and composers. Surveys Roma history and representations. No background in East European studies, music, or film is required; readings are in English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Variable title course for topics in Hungarian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Examines Mongolia's turbulent history from independence from China's last dynasty in 1911 through theocracy, revolution, and communism to today's market democracy. Also focuses on social, economic, cultural, and demographic changes. No prerequisite. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 360 or CEUS-U 469. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Mongolian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Traces the Ottoman Empire from its beginnings to its height under Suleyman the Magnificent. Themes include Turks before the empire, Asia Minor before the Turks, rival principalities, centralization, Ottomans as European and Middle Eastern, economy, society, religion, law, learning, ethnic/cultural diversity, and the "classical age" as a concept. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Turkish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) In-depth exploration of Chinggis Khan's Mongol Empire from its origins in the twelfth century in the continent-wide breakdown of the 1330s-1370s. Primary sources (Mongolian, Chinese, Middle Eastern, and European) in translation, including many of the medieval era's greatest histories and travelogues. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 393 or CEUS-U 368. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topic in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 399 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Survey of Russia and Central Asia's complex relations, covering Russian expansion in the sixteenth century, Russian conquest in the nineteenth century, socio-political developments, and the emergence of modern nations in the 1920s. Themes include mechanism of Empire, dynamics between conqueror and conquered, and colonial administration of Islamic peoples. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 412 or CEUS-U 494. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Surveys Islamic Central Asia from the sixteenth century to the Russian conquest, especially Chinggisid Uzbek states and the "tribal" dynasties, but also East Turkestan to 1755, and nomadic Qasaqs, Qirghiz, Turkmens. Themes include political institutions, legitimation, nomads and sedentaries; ethnic developments; religion and culture; sources and historiography. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 413 or CEUS-U 493. (3 credit hours.)
    • College of Arts and Sciences
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 104 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the social and historical studies Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 104 or COLL-S 104. (3 credit hours.)
    • Collins Living-Learning Center
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • European Studies, Institute for
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected ideas, trends, and problems in contemporary Europe from the perspective of social and behavioral sciences. Specific topics will be announced each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Geography
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) What do bananas, the 1979 Islamic Revolution, and drone warfare have in common? How do economic development, geopolitics, and resource extraction shape current events? Answers to these and other questions are used to explain the roots of contemporary global events. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines the geography of the Caucuses and North Central Asia. Focuses on general issues, such as the challenges posed by living in Russia's shadow, environmental degradation and political identity, before turning to an examination of each country. (3 credit hours.)
    • Geographic problems and prospects of the former republics of the Soviet Union with an emphasis on political geography, environmental issues, population, urbanization, energy, and the location of economic activity. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Emphasizes common themes across the countries of Europe and the distinctive cultures that make up the region. Begins with a discussion of the physical landscape of Europe, then explores the cultural and economic landscape of the region. (3 credit hours.)
    • Global and International Studies, School of
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of global issues relating to security, protests, and media. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of international and global issues relating to politics, security, media and health. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Provides academic structure to undergraduate students who wish to engage in a work experience through participation in internships domestically or internationally. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • History
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems across more than one period of Western European history. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in modern European history (1750–present). Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines the origins, character, and development of anti-Semitism from the Enlightenment to the post-Holocaust period. Asks whether anti-Semitism is a single phenomenon with a clear tradition and cause, or whether it has varied markedly over time and from country to country. (3 credit hours.)
    • Anti-Semitism in imperial and Weimar Germany; the Nazi rise to power; the destruction of European Jewry; Jewish behavior in crisis and extremity; the attitude of the Allied nations; mass murder in comparative historical perspective; theological, moral, and political implications. Credit given for only one of HIST-B 323 or JSTU-J 323. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to main events and issues in Russian history from earliest times to the Crimean War in the mid-nineteenth century. Covers foundation of a great Slavic state into the Eurasian plain, the Kievan era of early state building, colorful rulers such as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 101, HIST-D 102, or HIST-H 261. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to main events and issues in Russian history from the middle of the nineteenth century to present. Covers the great liberating reforms of Tsar Alexander II, the last tsar, Nicholas II, the revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin, the brutal tyrant Joseph Stalin, and the last Communist leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 101, HIST-D 103, or HIST-H 261. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) In recent decades democratically-oriented revolutions have occurred in Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union, Latin America, Africa, East and Southeast Asia, and the Middle East. What accounts for this phenomenon? What common ideas and practices link them? Why were some more successful than others? (3 credit hours.)
    • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • The revolution in Soviet politics, culture, and daily life wrought by Mikhail Gorbachev (1986–1991) and the end of the Soviet Empire. Examination of selected issues: political structures, family, education, youth, status of women and minorities. Historical roots traced. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 302 or REEI-R 302. (3 credit hours.)
    • Biographies of a number of Russia’s most colorful personalities and the times in which they lived; among them, Ivan the Terrible, Pugachev, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Bakunin, Tolstoy, Lenin, Trotsky, Stalin. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of the history of Jewish life in Eastern Europe. Topics to be discussed will include Hasidism, Kabbalah, shtetl life, Haskalah (the Jewish Enlightenment), Socialism, Yiddish literary traditions, and the Holocaust. (3 credit hours.)
    • Russian empire under Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Napoleon’s invasion, expansion across Asia into the Americas, nationalism, war, and revolution. Other topics include daily life of the common people, gender issues, religion, and the emergence of a modern industrial society. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 308 or HIST-D 409. (3 credit hours.)
    • Issues covered include Soviet politics and society on the eve of WWII, prewar diplomacy, the major battles of WWII on the Eastern Front, the Soviet “home front,” popular culture, and the impact of WWII on the Soviet Union and on the Soviet Union’s international position. (3 credit hours.)
    • Causes and development of Russian revolutions and civil war; Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin; purges, terror, economic development, society, and arts under Stalin; struggle against Hitler; scope and limits of de-Stalinization under Khrushchev; minorities, dissent, and life in the Soviet Union. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 310 or HIST-D 410. (3 credit hours.)
    • A history of one of the most neglected nations in European history, once the breadbasket of the Soviet Union and now one of the largest nations in Europe. Examines issues of national identity and national consciousness and explores the place of Ukraine in Eurasian history. (3 credit hours.)
    • Origin of the Hungarian people; settlement of the Danubian basin; adoption of Christianity; formation of Hungarian state; impact of western European civilization and economic system during Middle Ages and Renaissance; effect of Ottoman domination; Ottoman-Habsburg conflict; liberation of Hungary from Turkish rule. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 321 or HIST-D 421. (3 credit hours.)
    • Modernization and rebuilding of Hungary during Habsburg enlightened absolutism; age of reform and the revolution of 1848–1849; compromise of 1867; social and economic transformation of Hungary within the framework of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy; problems of a multinational state; World War I and collapse of historical Hungary. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 322 or HIST-D 422. (3 credit hours.)
    • Decline of the Ottoman Empire. Revolutionary traditions and movements; peasant societies and folk customs; literary and linguistic nationalism; Balkan irredentism. Formation of Serbian (Jugoslav), Greek, Rumanian, Bulgarian, Albanian, and Turkish national states. Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and British influence and imperialism in southeastern Europe and Near East. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 325 or HIST-D 425. (3 credit hours.)
    • Enlightened despotism; Metternichian system; struggle for German unification; Habsburg culture and civilization. German-Austrian, Hungarian, Czechoslovak, South Slavic, Rumanian, and Polish nationalism. Industrialization; Christian socialism and Austro-Marxism; murder at Sarajevo; destruction of the empire; its legacy to Europe. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 327 or HIST-D 427. (3 credit hours.)
    • Begins around 1900 with twilight of great empires (Russian, Prussian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian), exploring origins of modern eastern Europe, the “rebirth” of Eastern Europe after WWI; wild 1920s; polarizing ideological spectrum of the 1930s; and dynamics of communism and fascism. Given the spectre of WWII, this course will pose the question of whether and how we can read the interwar years in a way other than as a prelude to an inevitable catastrophe to come. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 328, HIST-D 329, or HIST-D 428. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines origins of communism in Eastern Europe, brutal takeover and Stalinization, attempts to reform communism, the fall of communism and ensuing battles for privatization, democratization, and the Wars in Yugoslavia. Looks at political institutions that shaped communist and post-communist Eastern Europe and important social and cultural developments. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 328, HIST-D 330, or HIST-D 428. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Topics include the origins of Judaism, Jewish life in ancient Israel and the Diaspora, Judaism and the origins of Christianity, Jewish society and culture under Christian and Muslim rule in the Middle Ages. Credit given for only one of HIST-H 251 or JSTU-J 251. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jewish history from early modern times to the present. Topics include Jewish daily life in early modern Europe and Ottoman Turkey, Jewish mysticism, Hasidism, Jewish emancipation, modern Judaism, anti-Semitism, the Holocaust, Zionism, the State of Israel, and the history of American Jewry. Credit given for only one of HIST-H 252 or JSTU-J 252. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The refinement of students’ skills as historians; will focus on the skills of writing, interpretation, historical reasoning, discussion, and research. May be repeated with a different topic and the authorization of the history undergraduate advisor for a total of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: HIST-J 300 or HIST-J 301. Normally limited to majors. Capstone course, generally taken in senior year. Students will discuss and analyze primary and/ or secondary sources and undertake a substantial project demonstrating mastery of the historian’s skills. Topics will vary. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jewish Studies
    • Topics include the origins of Judaism, Jewish life in ancient Israel and the Diaspora, Judaism and the origins of Christianity, Jewish society and culture under Christian and Muslim rule in the Middle Ages. Credit given for only one of HIST-H 251 or JSTU-J 251. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jewish history from early modern times to the present. Topics include Jewish daily life in early modern Europe and Ottoman Turkey, Jewish mysticism, Hasidism, Jewish emancipation, modern Judaism, anti-Semitism, the Holocaust, Zionism, the State of Israel, and the history of American Jewry. Credit given for only one of J252 or HIST-H 252. (3 credit hours.)
    • Anti-Semitism in the modern world; the Nazi rise to power; the destruction of European Jewry; Jewish behavior in crisis and extremity; the attitude of the Allied nations; mass murder in comparative historical perspective; anti-Semitism and racial thinking; collaboration, resistance, and rescue. Credit given for only one of JSTU-J 323 or HIST-B 323. (3 credit hours.)
    • Russian and East European Institute
    • (Can be used to meet the requirement for any of the 3 areas) Interdisciplinary study of the geography, natural resources, peoples, religions, economy, political and social systems, education, law, cultures, literatures, and arts of Russia. Emphasis on recent developments with appropriate attention to historical roots. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 302 or REEI-R 302. (3 credit hours.)
    • (Can be used to meet the requirement for any of the 3 areas) Interdisciplinary study of the geography, natural resources, peoples, religions, economy, political and social systems, education, law, cultures, literatures, and arts of East Central and Southeastern Europe. Emphasis on recent developments with appropriate attention to historical roots. (3 credit hours.)
    • Brief examination of selected topics related to Russia and East Europe. Variable topics. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 6 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Anthropology
    • Remembrance is analyzed as a cultural and social reality. Review of the theoretical literature on collective memory as it unfolds in written, narrative, visual, and audiovisual art; in architecture and monuments; in private and public ritual; in genealogy; and in the social experience of the body. (3 credit hours.)
    • Europe is viewed as an idea, an identity, and an historical consciousness. Students explore the meaning of this idea in the contemporary development of social and cultural anthropology, and in such social areas as regionalism and nationalism, ethnic identity, gender and kinship, religion, the city versus the village, and political life. (3 credit hours.)
    • General anthropological introduction to social institutions and cultural forms of the Arab countries of North Africa and the Near East, Israel, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, development of Islam and Muslim empires, traditional adaptive strategies, consequences of colonialism, independence and rise of nation-states, impact of modernization, changing conceptions of kinship, ethnicity, and gender. Credit given for only one of ANTH-E 397, CEUS-R 352, CEUS-U 397, or NELC-N 397. (3 credit hours.)
    • General anthropological introduction to societies and cultures of contemporary Muslim successor states of former Soviet Central Asia, Western China (Xinjiang), and Iran and Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, ethnohistory, traditional subsistence strategies, family, kinship, gender, sociopolitical organization, impact of colonial rule of tsarist and Soviet Russia and China, development of modern nation-states in Iran and Afghanistan, and dynamics of current conflicts and future prospects. Credit given for only one of ANTH-E 398, CEUS-R 316, or CEUS-U 398. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Intensive examination of selected topics in anthropology. Emphasis on analytic investigation and critical discussion. Topics vary. May be taken with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Explores the contradictory effects of socialism's "fall" through a study of new ethnographies of postsocialist societies. Regional inquiries will be related to broader intellectual issues such as globalization, social suffering, commodification and cultural identity, ethnicity and nation building, armed conflict, and gender inequalities. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Cross-cultural exploration of communication systems, ranging from face-to-face interaction to mediated forms of communication, with an emphasis on their cultural foundations and social organization. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in ANTH-E 415 and CMCL-C 415. (3 credit hours.)
    • This advanced seminar in medical anthropology focuses on theoretical approaches to understanding the body and notions of health, illness, and disease across cultures. Concentrates on interpretive and critical (political economy) approaches to issues of health and includes critical study of Western biomedicine. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Current issues in linguistic anthropology, designed to acquaint the student with readings and points of view not covered in the introductory courses. Topics such as languages of the world, variation in language, problems in linguistic structure, and culture and communication. Topic varies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Central Eurasian Studies
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for introductory topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 199 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for intermediate topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 299 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Variable title course for topics in Baltic-Finnish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • An introduction to Central Eurasia, especially the former Soviet Union, focusing on the 1980s and beyond. Main topics are politics, society, and economy; others include demography, Islam, women, and foreign policy. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 315 or CEUS-U 395. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Central Asian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Variable title course for topics in Hungarian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Mongolian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Turkish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Analyzes environmental and social conditions in the immense region of Northern and Central Eurasia (former Soviet Union). Covers general environmental and political situations; environmental transformation under Soviet rule; environmental and health problems; conclusions on current trends. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 394 or CEUS-U 374. (3 credit hours.)
    • Challenges the assumption that terms such as "Chinese," "Taiwanese," or "Kazakh" represent straightforward concepts. Via theories of identity, and careful attention to the history of China and Inner Asia, explores and explodes the association of identity and descent, language and ethnicity, citizenship and nationality. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topic in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 399 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Exploration of the roles of religious figures and institutions in sanctioning, exercising, and/or undermining political authority in Islamic Central Asia. Focuses on the political influence wielded by the local representatives of Islam's spiritual ideal, especially Sufi shaykhs and how they used their extraordinary socio-economic and political power. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 416 or CEUS-U 498. (3 credit hours.)
    • College of Arts and Sciences
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 104 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the social and historical studies Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 104 or COLL-S 104. (3 credit hours.)
    • Collins Living-Learning Center
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Criminal Justice
    • Roles of legal institutions and processes in social and cultural systems. Cross-cultural examination of the foundations and contexts of legal forms and content and their relation to social, economic, and political systems and institutions. Analysis of legal impact, legal change, and legal development. (3 credit hours.)
    • Interdisciplinary course examines how the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government are being influenced by the forces of transition. Analysis of Russian crime, including corruption, patterns of interpersonal violence, human trafficking, and drug use. Last section focuses on the Russian criminal justice system, including juvenile justice, policing, and prisons. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Intensive study and analysis of selected problems in criminal justice. Topics will vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Economics
    • P: ECON-E 321. Economic institutions, resource allocation mechanisms, incentives and decision-making in a Soviet-type economy; economics of transition to a market-oriented system. Particular attention is paid to price liberalization, development of the financial system, privatization of state-owned assets, opening to the world economy, and the role of private sector. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 386 or ECON-E 497. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: ECON-E 321; Additional prerequisites may be required depending on the seminar topic. Intensive study of a topic area in economics. Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ECON-S 201 or ECON-E 201; Honors student. Designed for students of superior ability. Covers same core material as ECON-E 202 and substitutes for ECON-E 202 as a prerequisite for other courses. (3 credit hours.)
    • European Studies, Institute for
    • A course with two interrelated parts. The first involves an analysis of the decision-making powers of the European Union (EU). This analysis then leads to a formal simulation of the EU. This course may be repeated for credit, for a maximum of 3 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected ideas, trends, and problems in contemporary Europe from the perspective of social and behavioral sciences. Specific topics will be announced each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Gender Studies
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Topical seminar in gender studies. Analysis of a particular issue or problem that has generated debate within gender-related scholarship in a particular discipline, or across several disciplines/fields of inquiry. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Global and International Studies, School of
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of global issues relating to security, protests, and media. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of international and global issues relating to politics, security, media and health. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Provides academic structure to undergraduate students who wish to engage in a work experience through participation in internships domestically or internationally. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Global Living-Learning Community
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Global Village director. Intermediate consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Global Village director. Intermediate consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Global Village director. Advanced consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study and analysis of intelligence in U.S. foreign policy and national security issues from 1776 to the present. A look at wartime and peacetime tactics, the Cold War, post–September 11th strategies, and both state and non-state threats. Examines shift to human intelligence, civil liberty issues, and foreign and domestic intelligence activities. (3 credit hours.)
    • Hutton Honors College
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focusing on topics in social and historical studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • International Studies
    • This introductory, interdisciplinary course exposes students to the various academic approaches essential to international studies and to the various concentrations that comprise the major. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Focuses on the interaction between social, political, and economic forces and human development at global, national, and subnational scales; introduces theoretical perspectives on economic development and the function of markets. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) This course focuses on the intensive study and analysis of selected international problems and issues within an interdisciplinary format. Topics will vary but will cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Advanced topics focusing on human rights discourse and the role international law, treaties and conventions play in addressing these rights globally. Topics are interdisciplinary in theory and method. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Advanced topics focusing on the development of the modern state and the role of international organizations in maintaining global security and promoting global governance. Addresses issues of political and cultural diplomacy and their effect in international disputes. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) This seminar will examine an international issue through a foreign perspective. Course readings and discussions will be conducted in a foreign language at an advanced level.  The seminar's objective is to expose participants to global problems utilizing non-U.S. sources. (1 credit hour.)
    • P: INTL-I 315. This required seminar is designed for senior majors who have completed all of the International Studies degree requirements to consolidate their studies. Students complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to their concentration. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of nationalism to explore how history, politics and culture conflict and converge in shaping multiple identities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Examines issues of international scope through service learning projects. Content varies with instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in INTL-I 435 and INTL-X 370. (3 credit hours.)
    • Political Science
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Examines countries around the world to investigate fundamental questions about politics. Topics include democratic development, promotion of economic prosperity, maintenance of security, and management of ethnic and religious conflict. Critical thinking skills encouraged. Cases for comparison include advanced industrialized democracies, communist and former communist countries, and developing countries. Credit given for only one of POLS-Y 107 and POLS-Y 217. (3 credit hours.)
    • Causes of war, nature and attributes of the state, imperialism, international law, national sovereignty, arbitration, adjudication, international organization, major international issues. Credit given for only one of POLS-Y 109 or POLS-Y 219. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Extensive analysis of selected contemporary political problems. Topics vary from semester to semester and are listed in the online May be repeated with different topics for 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Intensive examination of selected political topics for freshman and sophomore honors students. Emphasis on critical discussion and preparation of brief papers. May be repeated once for credit. (3 credit hours.)
    • Political process and government structure in the Russian state. Political institutions inherited from tsarist empire and the Soviet state (1917–1991), history of subsequent political reform. Political problems of ethnic conflict, creating democratic institutions, and of transition from socialism to market economy. (3 credit hours.)
    • Compares political change in the East European states, and emphasizes the legacies of authoritarianism and communism and the post-communist transition to democracy. Topics include the building of political institutions, the inclusion of citizens into the polity, the reform of the economy, the management of ethnic and social conflicts, and integration into the European Union. (3 credit hours.)
    • Comparative study of major twentieth-century genocides. Examines the political conditions, ideologies, and movements leading up to mass murder, and the ethnic and global context of genocide. Focuses on the question of responsibility and accountability from the viewpoints of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders in the national and international communities. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study of the politics of the European Union (EU). Assesses past and present dynamics of economic and political integration in Europe, the structure and work of European Union institutions, and EU public policies such as the Single Market, the common currency, common foreign and security policy, and trade. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) May be taken alone or in conjunction with related political science courses. A course tied to simulations of international organizations such as the European Union, the United Nations, or the Organization of American States. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Examination of the socioeconomic conditions and political ideologies leading up to the Holocaust, and the political, administrative, and social context for the genocide from the vantage of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders. Focus on the individual, national, and international responses to and responsibilities for the Holocaust. Consideration of the Holocaust's legacies for the postwar world. (3 credit hours.)
    • Compares factors that influence foreign policy and the foreign policy process. Focuses on domestic or internal sources of foreign policy behavior, including impact of individual leaders, group decision-making processes, bureaucratic politics, ideology and political culture, historical experience, and type of political system. Classroom simulations are central to the course. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: POLS-Y 332. Behavior of Russia and U.S.S.R. in world affairs from 1945 to the present. Emphasis on impact of geographic assets and vulnerabilities, historical experience, domestic politics, and the changing international environment. (3 credit hours.)
    • The nature of war. Theories and evidence on the causes of war. Discussion of the ways in which war has been conceived and perceived across time and of methods employed to study the phenomenon of war. (3 credit hours.)
    • Theories about the interaction between the international economic and political systems are the subject of this course. Works from each of the main traditions—liberal, Marxist, and statist—will be assigned. Specific topics covered will include (among others): the politics of trade, aid, foreign investment, and international monetary affairs; theories of dependency and imperialism; the politics of international competition in specific industries; the stability/ instability of international economic regimes. (3 credit hours.)
    • An exposition and critical analysis of the major political philosophers and philosophical schools from Plato to Machiavelli. (3 credit hours.)
    • An exposition and critical analysis of the major political philosophers and philosophical schools from Machiavelli to the present. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Origins and evolution of the UN; principal UN bodies, how they operate and what they do; who finances the UN; controversies and voting patterns in the UN; attitudes toward the UN and debates within member countries regarding its role; impact of UN activities and programs (e.g., conflict resolution and mediation, peacekeeping and peace enforcement; nation building, development aid, weapons proliferation, human rights, health, environment). Credit given for only one of NELC-N 398 or POLS-Y 399. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Topic varies with the instructor and year; consult the online May be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (2–3 credit hours.)
    • Business, Kelley School of
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
    • Public and Environmental Affairs, School of
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) No description is available for this course.
    • Art History
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) A survey of major styles and monuments in art and architecture from prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages. Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 101 or FINA-A 101. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Origins and development of the architecture, and especially the sculpture and painting, of the period from Constantine the Great (300 A.D.) to the fall of Constantinople in 1453 in the Byzantine East and the beginning of the Renaissance in the Latin West. Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 226 or FINA-A 226. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of major artists and styles in painting and sculpture from c. 1770 to 1900, emphasizing developments in France, England, and Germany. Topics include neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, and post-impressionism. Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 341 or FINA-A 341. (3 credit hours.)
    • Christian art as it developed in its first centuries within the Roman Empire (200-600). Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 421 or FINA-A 421. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Art and architecture of the Byzantine Empire (A.D. 600-1453). Consideration of materials from the core territories of the Byzantine world (Constantinople, Asia Minor, Greece), the Byzantine commonwealth of Orthodox lands (Kievan Rus, Serbia) and Western Europe (Sicily, Venice, Crusader states). Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 425 or FINA-A 425. (3 credit hours.)
    • Art, architecture and design of the first half of the twentieth century: cubism, futurism, German expressionism, Dada, constructivism, the Bauhaus, with emphasis on the central concepts of modernism and the avant-garde. Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 442 or FINA-A 442. (3 credit hours.)
    • Russian art from the twelfth century to the present. Emphasis on the period 1850 to the present: realism, the Slavic revival, symbolism, constructivism, and socialist realism. Credit given for only one of ARTH-A 480 or FINA-A 480. (3 credit hours.)
    • Central Eurasian Studies
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for introductory topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 199 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for intermediate topics in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 299 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Examination of major works of modern Finnish literature in translation. Themes include urbanization, industrialization, independence, the individual and society, alcoholism, "the sixties," role of women, and influence of fine arts, music, performing arts, and film. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Baltic-Finnish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Surveys Islam and Muslim communities in areas of the former U.S.S.R. After basic coverage of Islam, Russian expansion, and their interaction, the course focuses on the pressures experienced by and exerted by Islam as a religion and socio-cultural system, with attention to religious life's adaptations to the Soviet and post-Soviet context. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 313 or CEUS-U 394. (3 credit hours.)
    • Anthropology of former Soviet Central Asia and adjacent areas of Iran and Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, ethnohistory, subsistence traditions; kinship, gender, identities; religion; transformations under Russia, Iran, Afghanistan, and the war on terrorism. No previous knowledge presumed; background in anthropology helpful. Credit given for only one of ANTH-E 398, CEUS-R 316, or CEUS-U 398. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Central Asian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Europe's largest minority, the so-called "Gypsies," more properly the Roma, have been killed, hunted, and reviled; yet the exotic flavoring of "Gypsiness" has fascinated writers, artists, and composers. Surveys Roma history and representations. No background in East European studies, music, or film is required; readings are in English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Variable title course for topics in Hungarian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Ethnographic survey examines the social institutions and cultural forms in contemporary Middle Eastern societies (i.e., the Arab world, Israel, Turkey, Iran, and Afghanistan). Topics include ecology; Islam; pastoral nomadism; agriculture and cities; colonialism and nation-states; tribalism, ethnicity, and gender; and modernization, oil wealth, labor migration, and social unrest. Credit given for only one of ANTH-E 397, CEUS-R 352, CEUS-U 397, or NELC-N 397. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Mongolian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topics in Turkish studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • Surveys the Uralic (Finno-Ugric and Samoyed) peoples of northern Europe and Siberia. Topics include their origins and history, traditional and modern cultures, ethnic and national identity, development and modernization, and political independence and Russian rule. Also covers interrelations among Uralic peoples in the modern era. Credit given for only one of CEUS-R 392 or CEUS-U 370. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Variable title course for topic in Central Eurasian studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours in CEUS-R 399 and CEUS-U 320. (1–4 credit hours.)
    • College of Arts and Sciences
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 103 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the arts and humanities Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 103 or COLL-S 103. (3 credit hours.)
    • Collins Living-Learning Center
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) The arts, sciences, and professions in their larger contexts. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Comparative Literature
    • R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. The rise of realism in nineteenth-century fiction and its development into naturalism and impressionism; the symbolist reaction in poetry; the reemergence of the drama as a major genre. Authors such as Dickens, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Mallarme, Ibsen, Hauptmann, Strindberg, Chekhov. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Study of literature by women from different ages and societies. Consideration of issues such as the relationship to literary tradition and cultural context, the creation of an authoritative voice, or the representation of women in literature. Course may focus on one genre or mode (such as drama, lyric, autobiography, or satire). (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Historical interrelations between literature and philosophy. Recent topics have included free will and the problem of evil; mysticism, criminality, and suffering; existentialism and the literature of the absurd. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Selected topics focusing on Yiddish fiction and drama (1810-1914) or twentieth-century Yiddish fiction, drama, and poetry. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of CMLT-C 377 and GER-E 351. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Selected topics on history of Ashkenazic Jews; Old Yiddish and premodern Yiddish folklore and popular culture; history and sociology of Yiddish; modern Yiddish culture; and centers of modern Yiddish culture. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of CMLT-C 378 and GER-E 352. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) R: CMLT-C 205 or 3 credit hours of literature. Specific problems concerning the relationship of two or more literatures or of literature and another area in the humanities. May be repeated twice. (3 credit hours.)
    • English
    • Jewish authors, such as I. B. Singer and Elie Wiesel; groups of authors, such as Holocaust writers and writers about the immigrant experience; or genres and themes. Topic will vary from semester to semester. (3 credit hours.)
    • Folklore and Ethnomusicology
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Expressions of regional cultures and emerging nations of Europe. Social functions of folklore and folk music in rural and urban communities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Studies of folk culture in relationship to other fields. Focuses on such interdisciplinary topics as folk culture in relationship to language, literature, psychology, history, religion, sociology, musicology, or anthropology. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Germanic Studies
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected topics focusing on Yiddish fiction and drama (1810–1914) or twentieth-century Yiddish fiction, drama, and poetry. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours for CMLT-C 377, GER-E 351, and GER-Y 300. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected topics on history of Ashkenazic Jews; Old Yiddish and premodern Yiddish folklore and popular culture; history and sociology of Yiddish; modern Yiddish culture; and centers of modern Yiddish culture. Conducted in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours for CMLT-C 378, and GER-E 352, GER-Y 350. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of instructor. Readings in Yiddish or English translations on a topic in Yiddish Culture. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours in GER-X 493 and GER-Y 495. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Global and International Studies, School of
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of global issues relating to security, protests, and media. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Study of international and global issues relating to politics, security, media and health. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Provides academic structure to undergraduate students who wish to engage in a work experience through participation in internships domestically or internationally. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Global Living-Learning Community
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Global Village director. Intermediate consideration of a topic or issue of international dimension not normally covered by individual departments. Often interdisciplinary. Subjects vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Hutton Honors College
    • (approved topic: "Literature of the Holocaust") Focuses on works of fiction and/or nonfiction that are distinctive of a particular time period, memorable event or occurrence, or location. Relevant monographs capture the essence of a specific era, happening, or the perspectives of people in a particular place. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focusing on topics in arts and humanities. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jewish Studies
    • (approved topic: "Literature of the Holocaust") Selected arts and humanities topics and issues in Jewish studies. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topic: "Russian Jewish Writers") Selected arts and humanities topics and issues in Jewish studies. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Media School, The
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Media historiography, topics in national media history, national and international movements and trends. Topic varies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 420 and MSCH-F 420. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Junior/senior standing; or consent of instructor. Structure and function of international communication systems and barrier to flow of information among nations. Emphasis on gathering and disseminating information around the world. Study of the major newspapers of the world, international news agencies, and international broadcasting and satellite networks. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 448 or MSCH-J 448. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Junior/senior standing; or consent of instructor. American social-intellectual history integrated with the story of news media development, emphasizing the historical relationship of the mass media to American social, economic, and cultural patterns and developments. Origin, growth, shortcomings, and achievements of media. Impact of society on the media and vice versa. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 450 or MSCH-J 450. (3 credit hours.)
    • Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected works of Middle Eastern literature in relation to a singular cultural problem or theme. Topics will vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Religious Studies
    • Introduction to the doctrines, spirituality, and practice of Orthodox Christianity as expressed in various cultural and national contexts. Particular attention is paid to Orthodox asceticism, monasticism, parish life, theology, and religious rivalry within the confession. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: Course on Judaism or consent of instructor. Special topics such as problems in Jewish mystical tradition, the nature of religious community, charismatic leadership, religious biography. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in REL-A 430 and REL-R 445. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Religious problems confronting Jews and Judaism in our own time: women and Judaism, the impact of the Holocaust on Judaism, contemporary views of Zionism, religious trends in American Judaism. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Selected topics and movements in religion. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures
    • Introduction to history, literature, visual arts, music, film, and theatre of the Czechs. (3 credit hours.)
    • A history of the Czech lands and their art, literature, and music from the ninth through the late nineteenth centuries. Some discussion of Slovak language and literature also included. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of Czech fiction and drama from World War II to the present. Some discussion of émigré literature also included. (3 credit hours.)
    • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Focus on either Czech or Central European literature and culture; intensive study of an author, a period, or a literary or cultural development. Readings and lectures in English. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of Polish culture from the origins of the Polish state to modern times. Important historical, political, and social developments and trends as seen through literature, art, science, music, architecture, and political documents. Knowledge of Polish not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Polish literature and culture from the nineteenth century to World War II in its turbulent historical and sociopolitical context. Special attention will be given to cultural representations of historical upheavals and the analysis of literary and artistic strategies of responding to the conditions of foreign occupation, colonization, and genocide. Knowledge of Polish language and culture not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Focus on Polish literature and culture with comparisons to other world literatures and cultures; intensive study of an author, a period, or a literary or cultural development. Readings and lectures in English. No previous knowledge of Polish literature or culture required. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • An exploration of the post-World War II history of Polish cinema, made famous worldwide by directors such as Wajda, Kieslowski, and Polanski. Topics of interest include the cinema of moral anxiety (1970s); absurd comedies depicting life under communism; adaptations of literary classics; and new topics and genres in contemporary Polish film. (3 credit hours.)
    • Masterpieces of Russian short fiction in a variety of literary modes, from the early nineteenth century to the present, with particular attention to Russian writers and works that have influenced the short story worldwide. Authors include Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Chekhov, Babel, and Nabokov. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of development of Russian culture and thought from medieval Russia to the present, as seen primarily through literature and the arts. No knowledge of Russian is necessary. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of Russian culture from the late Soviet period to the present. Concentration on three simultaneous dichotomies: anthropological versus artistic culture; nationalism and classic Russian themes versus Western and postmodern trends; and popular versus serious art, music, and literature. Knowledge of Russian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey, analysis, and origins of traditional Russian folk tales based on thematic and structural classifications. Various approaches and theories are introduced in analyzing and interpreting folk tales, e.g., structural, formalist, thematic, and psychological. Pagan mythology, customs, and rituals are viewed as the possible origins of folktales. Influence of folk tales in music, arts, and cinema. (3 credit hours.)
    • The golden age of the Russian novel; its social, cultural, and economic context; the flowering of art and music; the rise of the metropolis in association with poverty, alienation, quest for identity (both national and personal), as reflected in the romantic and realistic works of Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, and Dostoevsky. Knowledge of Russian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • 1880 to present, a period of profound political, social, and intellectual ferment: the Bolshevik Revolution, Civil War, collectivization, the Stalinist purges, World War II, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the rise of a “new” Russia. Knowledge of Russian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Two giants of world literature who have shaped not only modern cultural history but philosophy and politics as well. Major works of each author will be read within an international perspective. Knowledge of Russian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Development of Russian cinematography from 1896 to the present. Characteristic features of Soviet films; the theory and practice of filmmaking in the former Soviet Union; the Soviet and Russian cinema in its relationship to Russian literature and in the larger context of European cinema art. Knowledge of Russian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Broad cultural overview of Central European cinema, highlighting major developments of cinema in Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, and the former Republics of Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia in the post-Stalin era. Special attention will be given to the individual style and aesthetics of several major film directors. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: SLAV-R 302 or equivalent. R: SLAV-R 263, SLAV-R 264. Reading, in the original, of important Russian literary works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Discussion and analysis of the works. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: SLAV-R 302 or equivalent. Extensive translation from the original of selected works on Russian history, government, music, folklore, geography, culture. Discussion of both linguistic problems and content. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of the cultures of Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Albania, and Romania, concentrating on the modern period. Lectures and readings in English. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Study and analysis of literary and cultural issues and problems in the Slavic studies area. Variable topics ranging from a study of a single novel or genre to selected themes of Slavic literature in their historical and cultural contexts. Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of literary and intellectual history of the South Slavs in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, with a special focus on the foundational ideology of nations and nationalism in this period. Readings and discussions in English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of the history and cultures of the Croats, Slovenes, Serbs, Macedonians, and Bulgarians from prehistory to the present. Readings and lectures in English. (3 credit hours.)
    • Selected topics from Slavic and East European literatures and cultures. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • An area studies exploration of the ways in which people of Central and East European heritage express and adapt their ethnic identities in a United States context. With departmental approval, may be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • An introductory course on the linguistic analysis of Slavic languages. With departmental approval, may be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • Survey of Ukrainian culture from Kyivan Rus to the present, including such diverse facets of Ukrainian culture as folklore, language, art, literature, and modern pop-culture. Readings are supplemented by documentaries, cartoons, and music. Knowledge of Ukrainian not required. (3 credit hours.)
    • Jacobs School of Music
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
  6. Minor GPA Requirement. A GPA of at least 3.000 for all courses taken in the minor including those where a grade lower than C- is earned is required.
  7. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the minor.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the minor—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to minor requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.