Majors, minors + certificates

Minor in Social Science and Medicine (SSMEDMIN)Department of Sociology

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

This minor allows students to explore the social origins of health and disease and the delivery and consumption of medical services, paying special attention to relevant social, historical, behavioral, and ethical contexts. The minor facilitates and certifies a greater understanding of the social context of health than could be achieved in a less integrated course of study. It emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach to health issues that establishes a bridge between the social sciences and health profession studies.

Minor requirements

The minor requires at least 15 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introductory course. One (1) course from the .
    • (approved topic: "Medicine in America") Introduces sociology through in-depth study of a major social problem; examines research on the problem; and explores alternative policies. Problems treated vary by section. Examples include the environment; women, men, and work; medicine in America; the sociology of sport; alcohol and drug use. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 15 credit hours. May be counted only once in the major toward departmental requirements. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Electives*.
    1. Advanced College Electives. Two (2) courses from the .
      • Social factors in mental illness: incidence and prevalence by social and cultural categories; variations in societal reaction; social organization of treatment institutions. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the sociological aspects of health, illness, patienthood, medical professionals, and health care systems. What factors create inequalities in health and in medical treatment? Expands understanding of health and illness and of conventional medical and insurance practices, and explores ways to improve health care in America. (3 credit hours.)
      • Designed for all students, this course is particularly relevant for those planning a career in health care. Explores current events and social problems, such as the re-emergence of childhood infectious diseases. Uses these examples to discuss sociological topics on the new Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). (3 credit hours.)
      • P: ANTH-B 200; or consent of instructor. Incorporates principles from evolutionary theory into our understanding of various infectious and chronic diseases common to human populations both past and present. Although proximate mechanisms involving physiology and behavior will be discussed, the focus will be to determine why such mechanisms have evolved in the first place. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: ANTH-B 200; or consent of instructor. Reviews the roles of hormones in the evolution and expression of human and nonhuman animal behaviors. Emphasis placed on behaviors associated with aggression, stress, mating, and parenting. Particularly relevant for students interested in evolutionary psychology and human health. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Sophomore standing. Variation within and between human populations in morphology, gene frequencies, and behavior. Biological concepts of race, race classification along with other taxonomic considerations, and evolutionary processes acting on humans in the past, present, and future. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Junior standing; or consent of instructor. In-depth perspectives on central topics in contemporary medical anthropology. Focus varies and may include such topics as HIV-AIDS in cross-cultural context; anthropological perspectives on disability; child health and nutrition; health and structural inequalities; and medical anthropology of gender and reproduction. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Provides a rigorous exploration of the theory of evolution—the conceptual core of biology. Topics include origins and history of life; the interplay of heredity and environment in shaping adaptations; molecular, behavioral, and social evolution; patterns of speciation, extinction, and their consequences; methods for inferring evolutionary relationships among organisms. Credit given for only one of the following: BIOL-L 318, BIOL-L 479, or BIOL-S 318. (3 credit hours.)
      • An ethnographic and legal analysis of the AIDS epidemic and its implications for criminal justice. Consideration of the institutional, scientific, and symbolic dimensions of the epidemic and of ethnographic research regarding illegal behaviors, and the transmission of HIV. (3 credit hours.)
      • The study of the chronic mentally ill and of career criminals. Examination of the groups so labeled, the responses of the criminal justice and mental health systems to them, and their movement back and forth between the streets, prisons, and psychiatric centers. (3 credit hours.)
      • Epidemic infectious disease in human history, explored in a wide variety of cultures and civilizations. (3 credit hours.)
      • Advanced topics examining pressing health and environmental challenges around the world. Focuses on the interaction of health and environmental problems that cross national borders and require a multinational or global effort to solve. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; or PSY-P 155. Focuses on the role of psychological factors in health and illness. Through readings, lecture, and discussion, students will become better consumers of research on behavior-health interactions and develop a broad base of knowledge concerning how behaviors and other psychological factors can affect health both positively and negatively. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; or PSY-P 155; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. A foundational course that examines clinical phenomena and their treatments from a scientific perspective. Emphasizes critical thinking and its importance in clinical practice. Focuses on questions, methods, findings, and applications drawn from clinical science and on ways to apply scientific knowledge and approaches to clinical practices. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; or PSY-P 155. A first course in abnormal psychology with emphasis on forms of abnormal behavior, etiology, development, interpretation, and final manifestations. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. R: 3 credits of Biology such as BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 111, BIOL-L 112, BIOL-A 215, or BIOL-P 215. A survey of contemporary neuroscience, examining the neural basis of behavior with approaches including molecular, cellular, developmental, cognitive, and behavioral neuroscience. Sensory and motor function, learning and memory, and other behaviors are considered using anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, and genetic approaches, providing a balanced view of neuroscience. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 324. A survey of major behavior disorders, with emphasis on empirical research and clinical description relative to etiology, assessment, prognosis, and treatment. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-K 300 or equivalent; and PSY-P 211. Introduces the evidence-based, or empirically supported, movement for selecting psychological interventions; research methods for evaluating interventions and related issues (e.g., therapy process); examples of empirically supported treatments (ESTs) for selected disorders; and issues regarding implementation of ESTs to the real world and future directions. (3 credit hours.)
      • What is the meaning of illness and healing? Is religion good or bad for health? How should healthcare providers respond to patients' religious beliefs? What is the relationship between complementary and alternative medicine or prayer and religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, or Christianity? This course is ideal for pre-med, pre-law, business/management, and other interested students. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Intermediate College Elective. One (1) course from the .
      • Additional course from the Advanced College Electives list
      • Introduction to the natural history of humans (Homo sapiens). Includes coverage of evolutionary theory and its relevance for understanding contemporary human biology, genetics and inheritance, description and analysis of human biological variation and adaptation, human-environment biocultural interactions, similarities and differences between humans and non-human primates, and the fossil record for primate and human evolution. (4 credit hours.)
      • A survey of health and disease from a biocultural perspective, which incorporates the evolutionary, ecological, and sociocultural context of health and disease to answer such questions as why we get sick and why there is population variation in the risk of becoming sick. Topics include reproductive, infectious, and chronic diseases. (3 credit hours.)
      • Focuses on concepts of health and illness in traditional cultures and societies. Addresses a variety of cross-cultural situations from the East and the West; special emphasis on Middle Eastern Arab traditions (Muslim, Christian, and Jewish). A student may conduct research on a traditional community in any part of the world. (3 credit hours.)
      • Provides a history to childbirth in North America in the last several hundred years, with occasional connective and comparative glances elsewhere. (3 credit hours.)
      • Europe in the age of bubonic plague, 1348–1715, with emphasis on changes in climate, population, food supplies, public health measures, economy, social relations, and religious and artistic responses to disaster. (3 credit hours.)
      • The history of medicine can best be understood in the context of the society of which it is a part. Stories of health and illness are placed within deeper historical contexts to enhance understanding of past societies. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examination of pressing health and environmental challenges around the world, such as deforestation, climate change and the spread of infectious diseases. Focuses on the interaction of health and environmental problems that cross national borders and require a multinational or global effort to solve. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Free Elective. One (1) course from the .
      • Additional course from the Advanced College Electives list
      • Additional course from the Intermediate College Elective list
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
  3. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the minor.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the minor—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to minor requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Notes

  • * With permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, up to three (3) credit hours of experiential learning courses with a health or mental health focus can be counted toward the minor