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Course descriptions, prerequisites and more...

Below you will find the list of courses offered through the College's schools, departments, and programs. This list includes important information about each course, including the course description, credit hours, prerequisites, repeatability, and more. Use the filters to narrow your search.

56 courses found. Showing results 1–10.
  • ECON-B 251 Fundamentals of Economics for Business I (3 cr.) First course in a two-course sequence that introduces business students to essential economic concepts. Examines the economic notions of cost and gains from trade, determinants of economic growth, consumer and firm behavior in competitive and non-competitive environments, the effects of taxation, externalities, moral hazard and adverse selection, and basic game theory. Credit given for only one of ECON-B 251 or ECON-E 251.
  • ECON-B 252 Fundamentals of Economics for Business II (3 cr.) P: ECON-B 251. Continuation of Fundamental of Economics for Business I. After a review of the major types of markets, explores macroeconomic concepts, beginning with measurement and the National Income Accounts, and then moving to cycle fluctuations and performance of stock markets. Concludes with microeconomic and macroeconomic perspectives in two areas: labor markets and globalization will applications in business contexts. Credit given for only one of ECON-B 252 or ECON-E 252.
  • ECON-E 113 Capitalism and Democracy (3 cr.) Examines economics and politics through the lenses of capitalism and democracy. Compares virtues of different economic systems (socialism, communism, capitalism) and political systems (autocracy, democracy) based on efficiency and equality. Discusses relationships between systems with focus on whether the erosion of liberal democratic norms affects how economy functions, and vice-versa. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 113 or POLS-Y 121.
  • ECON-E 115 Everyday Economics (3 cr.) Cannot be counted toward a major, interdepartmental major, or minor in economics. Establishes the foundation necessary to achieve economic literacy by providing an introduction to economic concepts and institutions encountered in daily life: credit markets, inflation, interest rates, taxes, retirement savings, insurance, and the fundamental economic principles underlying these markets.
  • ECON-E 201 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.) Scarcity, opportunity cost, competitive and non-competitive market pricing, and interdependence as an analytical core. Individual sections apply this core to a variety of current economic policy problems, such as poverty, pollution, excise taxes, rent controls, and farm subsidies.
  • ECON-E 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201. Measuring and explaining aggregate economic performance, money, monetary policy, and fiscal policy as an analytical core. Individual sections apply this core to a variety of current economic policy problems, such as inflation, unemployment, and economic growth.
  • ECON-E 203 Introduction to International Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-B 251 or ECON-E 251. Basic introduction to global economy with an emphasis on fundamentals of international trade: why and how nations trade; the cost and benefits of free trade; the basis for and implications of trade restrictions; international migration and capital flows; international economic institutions and agreements; foreign exchange.
  • New course description or prerequisite(s) for Spring 2023! (Previous versions)ECON-E 211 Applied Principles of Microeconomics: Creative Commerce (3 cr.) P: Eskenazi School of Art, Architecture, and Design majors and minors only. Introduction to core microeconomic principles with applications to creative commerce. Covers scarcity, opportunity cost, competitive and non-competitive market pricing, as well as topics like supply chain management, branding, advertising and special behavioral features including snob effects, bandwagon effects, and particular search/shopping behavior for experience vs search goods. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 201 or ECON-E 211.
  • ECON-E 221 Models and Methods of Economic Analysis (3 cr.) P: ECON-B 251 or ECON-E 251; and MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. Preparation in the mathematical tools and analytical methods utilized in the economic decision-making models developed in ECON-E 321. Designed as an optional transitional class for students who did not complete ECON-E 321 prerequisites at IU or for students who want additional preparation for ECON-E 321.
  • ECON-E 251 Fundamentals of Economics I (3 cr.) First course in a two-course sequence that lays the foundations for a solid understanding of economics. Examines the economic notions of cost and gains from trade, determinants of economic growth, consumer and firm behavior in competitive and non-competitive environments, the effects of taxation, externalities, moral hazard and adverse selection, and public policy applications. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 251 or ECON-B 251.