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Course descriptions, prerequisites and more...

Below you will find the list of courses offered through the College's schools, departments, and programs. This list includes important information about each course, including the course description, credit hours, prerequisites, repeatability, and more. Use the filters to narrow your search.

220 courses found. Showing results 1–10.
  • HIST-A 100 Issues in United States History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  • HIST-A 112 American Diversity: A History (3 cr.) How has Americans' "diversity" -racial, ethnic, religious, gender, sexual, generational, regional, and class differences- shaped U.S. history? Why and how have Americans used different identity categories? Studying individuals and episodes, this course emphasizes the roles of culture, conflict, and government in making one of the world's most diverse nations.
  • HIST-A 200 Issues in United States History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but are usually broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  • HIST-A 205 Asian American History (3 cr.) Examines the history of Asian migration to the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present as part of the making of the "Pacific World." Major themes to be explored include community formation, race, citizenship, nation, and transnationalism.
  • HIST-A 207 Introduction to Native American History (3 cr.) This introductory course surveys the history of Native peoples of North America from the earliest times to the present. It seeks to provide students with a broad understanding of Native American history, prepare students for more advanced coursework in Native studies, and enhance students' understanding of colonialism and American history.
  • HIST-A 222 Law in America (3 cr.) This course will examine the American legal system from the Revolution to the present. It will use trials, judicial opinions, statutes, stories, films, and other materials to study criminal prosecutions, private law suits, constitutional conflicts, and other critical parts of the American legal experience. The basic goals of the course are to help students understand why law has had a powerful role in the development of American society and the consequences of the American reliance on law.
  • HIST-A 225 Elvis, Dylan, and Post-War America (3 cr.) Surveys changes in American society from World War II through the 1960s. Using lectures, readings, and films, the course looks at key debates of the times over war, sexuality, patriotism, and the counter-culture and pays attention to pivotal figures like Kinsey, Elvis, Dylan, and John Kennedy.
  • HIST-A 230 American Pleasure: Leisure and Enjoyment in Modern U.S. History (3 cr.) Transformation of pleasures in industrial/post-industrial US, 1860s-present. Nature of different pleasures and ways Americans have experienced and justified them. Particular focus on attempts to regulate and abolish certain forms of enjoyment. Topics include alcohol, eating, prostitution, contraception, pornography, smoking, dancing, amusement parks, vacations, music, movies, television, Christmas and other holidays.
  • HIST-A 235 History of American Empire (3 cr.) When did the United States become an empire? Did it inherit an imperial mindset from Britain? Would it be a different kind of empire, or an alternative to empire? This course explores the history of American political discourse about empire, and the history of American foreign relations throughout the world.
  • HIST-A 240 Get Me Out! The History of Birth (3 cr.) A history of childbirth in North America, focusing on birthing women, midwives and doctors, from the 17th century to the present day.