Majors, minors + certificates

Minor in Apparel Merchandising (Minors)Students on Summer 2018, Fall 2018, or Spring 2019 requirements (APMDMIN)School of Art, Architecture + Design

The Minor in Apparel Merchandising provides students with a broad, introductory exposure to topics foundational to apparel merchandising (including an overview of the apparel industry and retail merchandising), as well as the opportunity either to study additional topics in an exploratory way, or to gain more focused experience with a specific topic area of their choice.

Minor requirements

The minor requires at least 15 credit hours (21 credit hours with the Addenda Requirements), including the requirements listed below.

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  1. Fundamental Skills.
    1. Introduction to Apparel Merchandising. One (1) course from the Introduction to Apparel Merchandising list.
      • SOAD-M 209 Apparel Industries An examination of the retail cycle and the social and economic factors underlying the fashion business. Retail merchandising principles and contemporary retail issues are examined. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 209 or SOAD-M 209. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Introductory Elective. One (1) course from the Introductory Elective list.
      • SOAD-F 203 Materials for Merchandising and Fashion Design P: Grade of C- or higher in one of AMID-R 100, SOAD-A 100, or SOAD-M 209.. Lecture plus laboratory. Course fee required Textile fibers, yarns, fabrication, and finishes, textile processing and properties; selection and care of textiles for human use. Credit given for only one of AMID-F 203 or SOAD-F 203. (3 credit hours.)
      • SOAD-M 204 Manufacturing and Quality Analysis P: Grade of C- or higher in one of AMID-R 100, AMID-R 209, or SOAD-M 209. Focuses on the manufacturing and product development stage of the retail cycle. This stage comprises apparel merchandising history, technology, textiles, performance, value, and quality analysis. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 204 or SOAD-M 204. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Principles of Retail Merchandising. One (1) course from the Principles of Retail Merchandising list.
      • SOAD-M 315 Principles of Retail Merchandising P: Sophomore standing or higher; and BUS-K 201; and grade of C- or higher in MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, or equivalent; and one of AMID-R 100, AMID-R 209, or SOAD-M 209. An examination of the contemporary retail environment as it relates to principles, such as the profit and loss analysis, retail math, markups, markdowns, and turnover. Comprehensive analysis and strategy development using retail merchandising principles are emphasized. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 315 or SOAD-M 315. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Advanced Courses. Two (2) courses and six (6) credit hours from the Advanced Courses list.
    • SOAD-M 308 Brand Management and Advertising P: Junior standing. Strategic marketing communication centered on building and maintaining brand equity, encompassing all stages of the retail cycle. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 308 or SOAD-M 308. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 309 Strategies in Retail Promotion P: Sophomore standing or higher; one course from AMID-R 100, AMID-R 209, or SOAD-M 209. Application of design elements and principles to commercial display and development of creative visual merchandising techniques; various media explored. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 309 or SOAD-M 309. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 316 Retail Product Management P: Sophomore standing or higher; and one of AMID-R 100, AMID-R 209, or SOAD-M 209. Design thinking will be used to study strategic product management in the current retail environment. Function and practices in product distribution, merchandising and retail selling to the end use consumer segments of the retail cycle will be examined as they relate to contemporary retail store management and operations. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 316 or SOAD-M 316. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 327 Product Development P: AMID-R 204 or SOAD-M 204; and junior standing; or consent of department. Functions and practices of product development; understanding and defining the customer; researching fashion trends from color and fabric to silhouette; identifying how and when to apply trends to targeted customers; practical application of executing concepts into finished products. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 327 or SOAD-M 327. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 350 Omnichannel Innovation Application of Human-Centered Design (HCD, aka. design thinking) in omnichannel merchandising to develop innovative omnichannel solutions and improve consumer/human experience. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 350 or SOAD-M 350. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 404 International Textiles and Apparel Trade P: AMID-F 203 or SOAD-F 203; and ECON-E 201 or ECON-E 202; and junior standing. International factors affecting the United States textile, apparel, and retail industries, including comparative analysis of the economic, political, and social implications of globalization. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 404 or SOAD-M 404. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 405 International Fashion Consumers and Retailers P: Junior or senior standing. For students pursuing a degree, major or minor through the Department of Apparel Merchandising and Interior Design Global and country-specific factors that impact distribution systems for—and consumption of—fashion related products. Promotes an understanding of consumers of fashion products within a global context and motivations for pursuing a global marketing and retailing strategy. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 405 or SOAD-M 405. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 409 Retail Industry Field Seminar P: Consent of instructor and department chair. Study tour designed as an overview of the retail, apparel, and textile industry, taught through a series of seminars conducted by business professionals outside the Bloomington community. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 409 or SOAD-M 409. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 410 Apparel Entrepreneurship P: Junior standing. Explores the entrepreneurial concept through the use of the entire retail cycle related to the vision of developing a business plan and ultimately opening a retail business selling unit. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 410 or SOAD-M 410. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 412 Global Sourcing P: Junior standing; and one of AMID-R 100, AMID-R 204, AMID-R 209, SOAD-M 204, or SOAD-M 209. Issues and strategies of global sourcing in the apparel industry: natural resources, labor issues, factory profiles, quota and duty issues of key sourcing centers. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 412 or SOAD-M 412. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 413 Planning and Analysis P: Grade of C- or higher in AMID-R 315 or SOAD-M 315. Essentials of merchandise buying and planning: consumer trends, market resources and trade practices, seasonal plans, assortment planning and analytic tools for inventory evaluations. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 413 or SOAD-M 413. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 416 Sustainability in Product: Fashion Design, Merchandising, and Retailing P: Senior standing. Examination of sustainability concepts as applied to decision making throughout the process of product design, development, retailing, use, and disposal. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 416 or SOAD-M 416. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 450 Profiling the Apparel Customer P: Junior standing. In-depth study of customer-driven thinking supported by the understanding and study of retail research, design, branding, marketing and sales strategies. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 450 or SOAD-M 450. (3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-M 485 Topics in Apparel Merchandising Advanced selected topics in an area of apparel merchandising. Topics vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours in AMID-R 485, AMID-R 492, and SOAD-M 485. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • SOAD-X 492 Independent Study in Retail P: Consent of department. Independent coursework or project under supervision on problems of special interest. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in AMID-R 490, AMID-X 492 and SOAD-X 492. (1–3 credit hours.)
  3. Addenda Requirements*.
    1. Introduction to Business Computing. One (1) course from the Introduction to Business Computing list.
      • BUS-K 201 The Computer in Business No description is available for this course.
    2. Finite Mathematics or Calculus or equivalent. One (1) course from the Finite Mathematics or Calculus or equivalent list.
      • MATH-D 117 Introduction to Finite Mathematics II P: MATH-D 116 or consent of the department. MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117 is a two-course sequence Topics for the course are taken from MATH-M 118. Credit for the College of Arts and Sciences Foundations requirement in Mathematical Modeling or the College's N&M Breadth of Inquiry requirement will be given only upon completion of both MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117 with a passing grade. Credit given for only one of MATH-A 118, MATH-M 118, MATH-S 118, MATH-V 118; or MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117. (2 credit hours.)
      • MATH-J 113 Introduction to Calculus with Applications P: MATH-J 112 with a grade of C- or higher; or consent of department. For Groups students only. MATH-J 113 can count toward the College of Arts and Sciences Foundations requirement in mathematical modeling and the College of Arts and Sciences natural and mathematical sciences Breadth of Inquiry requirement for Groups students´╗┐ A survey of calculus. Credit given for only one of MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. (3 credit hours.)
      • MATH-M 118 Finite Mathematics R: To be successful students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 014, MATH-M 018, or MATH-J 111 Sets, counting, basic probability, including random variables and expected values. Linear s, matrices, linear programming, and applications. Credit given for only one of MATH-A 118, MATH-M 118, MATH-S 118, MATH-V 118; or MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117. (3 credit hours.)
      • MATH-M 119 Brief Survey of Calculus I R: To be successful students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 025 or MATH-M 027 Introduction to calculus. Primarily for students from business and the social sciences. Credit given for only one of MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. (3 credit hours.)
      • MATH-M 211 Calculus I R: To be successful students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus, and trigonometry as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 027 Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications. A student may receive credit for only one of the following: MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. (4 credit hours.)
      • MATH-M 213 Accelerated Calculus P: Placement by examination. Designed for students with one year of calculus in high school. Students completing MATH-M 213 with a final grade of A or B may receive credit for MATH-M 211 Review of material covered in MATH-M 211 followed by an intensive study of all material in MATH-M 212. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 212 or MATH-M 213. (4 credit hours.)
      • MATH-S 118 Honors Finite Mathematics P: Mastery of two years of high school algebra. Designed for students of outstanding ability in mathematics. Covers all material of MATH-M 118 and additional topics from statistics and game theory. Computers may be used in this course, but no previous experience is assumed. (3 credit hours.)
      • MATH-S 211 Honors Calculus I P: Hutton Honors College membership or consent of department. R: To be successful students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus and trigonometry as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 027 Designed for students of outstanding ability, who are considering further study in mathematics. Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications, with emphasis placed on theory. Credit given for only one of MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-S 211, or MATH-V 119. (4 credit hours.)
      • MATH-V 118 Finite Mathematics with Applications (approved topics: "Finite Math in Action"; "Finite Mathematics for the Social and Biological Sciences"; "Finite and Consumer Mathematics") R: To be successful students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 014, MATH-M 018, or MATH-J 111 Sets, counting, basic probability, linear modelling, and other discrete topics. Applications to various areas depending on topic. Possibilities include social and biological sciences and consumer mathematics. Credit given for only one of MATH-A 118, MATH-M 118, MATH-S 118, MATH-V 118; or MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117. (3 credit hours.)
      • MATH-V 119 Applied Brief Calculus I (approved topic: "Applied Brief Calculus I for the Life Sciences") P: Two years of high school algebra or MATH-M 014. R: To be successful students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 025 or MATH-M 027 Introduction to calculus. Variable topic course with emphasis on non-business topics and applications. The topic(s) will be listed in the Schedule of Classes each semester. A student may receive credit for only one of the following: MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-S 211, or MATH-V 119. (3 credit hours.)

Notes

  • * Courses used to fulfill addenda requirements require a grade of C- or higher and do not count toward the Minor GPA or Minor Hours.