Majors, minors + certificates

Certificate in Food Studies (FOODSTACRT)Food Institute

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The aim of the Certificate in Food Studies is to lead students toward a more profound understanding of the important environmental, political, economic, and public health issues attached to food production, transportation, transformation, and consumption.

Certificate requirements

The certificate requires at least 21 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introduction to Food Studies. One (1) course from the .
    • Explores many different aspects of the food movement in a single course. Topics include organic agriculture, school lunch reform, farm-to-school programs, urban agriculture and food sovereignty using a multi-disciplinary perspective. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Food Studies Courses1.
    1. History, Art and Culture of Food. One (1) course from the .
      • (approved topic: "American Appetites ") Invites a critical and historical analysis of the relation of culture to nation: why is the study of culture traditionally bound in national frames of reference, and how might we organize a study of culture differently? Pursues the question topically (by considering ideas, peoples, social movements, etc., that cross national borders) and conceptually (by attention to the intellectual traditions that make possible alternative mappings of cultural study). May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: " Food Culture & Taste of Italy ") An ethnographic survey of a selected culture area or ethnic group. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • Studies a range of people and places—from cave dwellers to reality TV, New Guinea to New York. Explores how food reflects and creates gender and promotes and expresses sexuality. Readings from many disciplines will foster wide ranging and lively discussion. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the theoretical and methodological tools that archaeologists use to study food and foodways in ancient societies from a global anthropological perspective. Reveals how studying food and ancient foodways helps anthropologists gain insight into the economic, historic, and political realities of past peoples. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics: "Global Appetites/Local Tastes"; "Food and Society"; "Foodstuff: Food and the Arts ") Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 103 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the arts and humanities Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 103 or COLL-S 103. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Chocolate: Food of the Gods ") Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 104 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the social and historical studies Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 104 or COLL-S 104. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics: "Food for Thought"; "Food Policy and Poverty ") P: Open only to freshmen. Introduction to college-level projects chosen from social and historical studies fields. Students will learn how scholars frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches in a small-class experience with a faculty member. Writing and related skills are stressed. Topics will vary. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 104 or COLL-S 104. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Food Cultures of Greece ") Selected ideas, trends, and problems in contemporary Europe from the perspective of arts and humanities. Specific topics will be announced each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • No credit for the French minor. Study of French culture focusing on cuisine, fashion, and other forms of creative expression, as well as their influence upon societies in France and around the world. May include study of manners, customs and stylistic trends in home design and architecture. Taught in English. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Food and Family in Italian American Culture ") No credit for the Italian minor. Selected materials emphasizing a particular author, genre, or theme in Italian culture. Interdisciplinary approach combining political, historical, social, and artistic methods. Subjects vary from semester to semester and are listed in the online Schedule of Classes. Taught in English. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Promotes understanding of the history and geographic distribution of the world's food cultures. Focuses on the material aspects of food and food's relationship to society. Increases knowledge of food and cultures through reading, discussion and cooking. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to major cuisines of different countries. Food knowledge and practical skills are acquired through reading and cooking. Students are expected to be active participants in the course through reading, cooking and tasting food. Includes the cooking of a 4–5 course meal each class. May repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. S/F grading. (3 credit hours.)
      • What is the relationship between war, food and a distinctive sense of place? Uses literary nonfiction, including memoirs and histories, to examine how war shapes what people eat, how they get food, and how they use it to connect to communities and the places they inhabit. Credit given for only one of GEOG-G 384 or GEOG-G 445. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Food in History ") Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Tasting Food in Japanese: Food, Language and Linguistics") P: Consent of Hutton Honors College. Honors seminar focusing on topics in social and historical studies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Political Economy of Food. One (1) course from the .
      • (approved topic: "Exploring Sustainable Agriculture and Trade ") Selected topics in anthropological methods, techniques, and area or thematic studies. Course content will draw on the fieldwork experiences and/or current research of the instructor(s). May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–4 credit hours.)
      • In this course we will examine, across space and time, the significance and meaning of food, its production and consumption in human culture and society. Ideas and practices concerning food are deeply held markers of who we are and how we define ourselves. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "People and Plants: Ethnobotany ") Intensive examination of selected topics in anthropology. Emphasis on analytic investigation and critical discussion. Topics vary. May be taken with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Discussion of the economy of food production, trade and consumption on a global basis. Gives a cross-cultural and historical perspective on the development of cooking and cuisine in relationship to individual, national, and ethnic identity. Relates cuisine to modernity, migration, and forms of cultural mixing and Creolization. (3 credit hours.)
      • Considers diverse expressions of "coffee culture" in production, markets, and consumption patterns. Explores the history of coffee production and trade, coffee's impact on international relations, and its implications for environmental changes, social justice, and economic development. Also studies local meanings of coffee and its consumption. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Buffalo Nation ") P: ANTH-P 200 or consent of instructor. Intensive examination of selected topics in archaeology. Development of skills in analysis and criticism. Topic varies. May be taken with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Foodstuff: Food and Culture ") Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 104 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the social and historical studies Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 104 or COLL-S 104. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: ECON-E 321. Basic theory of common property resources applied to environment and resource conservation problems. Topics include economic efficiency, equity, measurement problems, and policy formulation. (3 credit hours.)
      • Focuses on concepts of health and illness in traditional cultures and societies. Addresses a variety of cross-cultural situations from the East and the West; special emphasis on Middle Eastern Arab traditions (Muslim, Christian, and Jewish). A student may conduct research on a traditional community in any part of the world. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Crossing Animal Borders ") No credit for the Italian minor. Selected materials emphasizing a particular author, genre, or theme in Italian culture. Interdisciplinary approach combining political, historical, social, and artistic methods. Subjects vary from semester to semester and are listed in the online Schedule of Classes. Taught in English. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Just as we shape the environment, the environment shapes us. From globalization to food production to climate change, learn how humans and environments interact. (3 credit hours.)
      • A survey of the present and past distributions of the world's plants and animals, emphasizing ecological explanation of species distributions. Topics include evolution and distribution of major plant and animal groups, world vegetation, plant and animal domestication, introduction of plant and animal pests, destruction of natural communities, and extinction. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course examines the experience of food insecurity in the USA, the role of poverty in food production and consumption, and the current mitigation strategies and social movements challenging the global food regime. Students will learn the differences and connections between concepts of food security, food justice, and food sovereignty. Relationships between food and gender, race, and ethnicity will be explored, along with the geographical and social concepts of food deserts and food choice. (3 credit hours.)
      • From connecting with the earth to changing the food system, this course digs into the narratives surrounding community gardens and community orchards. Explores topics like sustainability, food justice, and the pastoral roots of these projects. Utilizes multimedia, speakers from community projects, and class discussion. (3 credit hours.)
      • How is the production and consumption of food related to poverty and development? Explores how global food systems affect farmers, farmworkers, retailers and consumers; the ways scientific advances changed rural economies in the Third World; and the history of famine and contemporary food security issues. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to food production and consumption systems, emphasizing linkages to land use and social change on food/farming system sustainability. Topics include urbanization, population growth, and economic liberalization; farming livelihoods, gender, and poverty; biotechnology; agro-ecology, global health. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Roots, Fruits, and Jamaican Ecologies ") Intensive study and analysis of selected Latin American and Caribbean problems of limited scope within an interdisciplinary format. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, or periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Food Security ") Examines issues of international scope through service learning projects. Content varies with instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in INTL-I 435 and INTL-X 370. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Food Security: Global Perspectives ") Advanced topics examining pressing health and environmental challenges around the world. Focuses on the interaction of health and environmental problems that cross national borders and require a multinational or global effort to solve. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Food Security: Issues/Spanish ") This seminar will examine an international issue through a foreign perspective. Course readings and discussions will be conducted in a foreign language at an advanced level.  The seminar's objective is to expose participants to global problems utilizing non-U.S. sources. (1 credit hour.)
      • (approved topic: "The Politics of What's for Dinner ") Extensive analysis of selected contemporary political problems. Topics vary from semester to semester and are listed in the online May be repeated with different topics for 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Farming the City: Global Perspectives on Urban Agriculture & Food Security") No description is available for this course.
    3. Science of Food. One (1) course from the .
      • Introduction to the natural history of humans (Homo sapiens). Includes coverage of evolutionary theory and its relevance for understanding contemporary human biology, genetics and inheritance, description and analysis of human biological variation and adaptation, human-environment biocultural interactions, similarities and differences between humans and non-human primates, and the fossil record for primate and human evolution. (4 credit hours.)
      • How the long-term history of human diet has influenced our genetic, physiological, cultural, and socioeconomic development. Evolutionary and ecological perspectives on modern human diet and nutrition, including survey of modern human and nonhuman primate diets and the record of prehistoric human diet and methods of dietary reconstruction. (3 credit hours.)
      • Principles of ecosystem ecology and their application to the sustainable use of energy and resources in urban and agricultural ecosystems, with emphasis on the integration of environmental, social, and economic concerns. (3 credit hours.)
      • Not open to biology majors. Interactions of human beings with other elements of the biosphere with emphasis on population, community, and ecosystem levels of ecology. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to the principles and biotechnological aspects of microbial fermentation and to the many and varied industries that rely on fermentation. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics: "Biology of Food"; "Foodstuff: Food and Science ") Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of COLL-C 105 will meet the objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences Critical Approaches curriculum. The curriculum is intended for freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the natural and mathematical sciences Breadth of Inquiry area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and related skills are stressed. Credit given for only one of COLL-C 105 or COLL-S 105. (3 credit hours.)
      • A survey of the present and past distributions of the world's plants and animals, emphasizing ecological explanation of species distributions. Topics include evolution and distribution of major plant and animal groups, world vegetation, plant and animal domestication, introduction of plant and animal pests, destruction of natural communities, and extinction. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Food for Thought–The Cognitive Science of Eating ") Applies concepts used by the natural and physical sciences to illuminate general laws of science and to describe natural phenomena using primarily quantitative methods and empirical inquiry. Uses the scientific method for asking and answering questions about scientific phenomena and scientific uncertainty. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
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      • (approved topics: "Food and Culture"; "Food Tourism and Public Health ") No description is available for this course.
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    4. Electives. Two (2) courses from the .
      • Additional course from the History, Art and Culture of Food list
      • Additional course from the Political Economy of Food list
      • Additional courses from the Science of Food list
  3. Internships2.
    • Indoor. Focuses on food preparation, or other aspects of the food system. Likely venues include campus dining halls, local restaurants, and community kitchens.
    • Outdoor. Focuses on food cultivation, production, and distribution. Likely venues include the campus farm, community or school gardens and local farms. Summer internships completed away from Bloomington are also likely to be approved.
  4. Capstone. One (1) course from the .
    • P: Senior major in Geography; or consent of instructor. In this capstone course, majors will put their Geography training to work in a collaborative, practically-oriented research project supervised by a faculty member. (3 credit hours.)
  5. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 9 credit hours in the certificate must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 9 credit hours in the certificate must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the certificate.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the certificate—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to certificate requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Notes

  • 1 At least 9 credit hours of courses used to fulfill the Food Studies Courses requirement must come from the College of Arts and Sciences. Courses not on the lists below may be included with approval from the Food Institute director.
  • 2 The Food Institute in collaboration with The College of Arts and Sciences Walter Center for Career Achievement will help students to arrange internships with IU facilities and other local sponsors. Although focused on Bloomington and the surrounding countryside, students might also choose to fulfill internship requirements at farms or kitchens closer to their own homes during summer breaks.