Majors, minors + certificates

Minor in Scientific Skills and Research Integrity (SSRIMIN)Department of History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

Students pursuing the Minor in Scientific Skills and Research Integrity will acquire the competencies and analytic skills to conduct research responsibly, to collaborate and communicate effectively, and to reflect on urgent questions about science in society—questions concerning regulation, responsibility, reliability and sustainability. Students will learn to appreciate that science literacy means more than knowing facts and will gain a broader understanding of how science works. Students will be acquainted with a broad set of issues, including questions of authorship and publication ethics, expertise and the evidential basis for science policy decisions, and responsible communication both within science and beyond. Throughout the program, the focus will be on applications of these skills to the student's major.

Minor requirements

The minor requires at least 15 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introductory Course. One (1) course from the .
    • An introduction to the formative steps in the scientific tradition. The course will survey in a chronological sequence aspects of the Aristotelian worldview, the Copernican revolution, the mechanical philosophy, the chemical and Darwinian revolutions, and the rise of twentieth-century science. (3 credit hours.)
    • Patterns of scientific reasoning presented in a simple form useful to both nonscientists and prospective scientists for understanding and evaluating scientific information of all sorts. Illustrations in the natural, biological, behavioral, and biomedical sciences are drawn from a wide variety of historical and contemporary sources, including popular magazines and newspapers. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Junior standing or consent of instructor. R: one course in philosophy or philosophy of science. Science claims to tell us what the world is like, even the part of the world we cannot see, and to explain why things happen the way they do. But these claims are controversial. This course examines competing models of scientific explanation and the ongoing debate over whether scientific theories should or even can be interpreted realistically. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Core Course. One (1) course from the .
    • Science is governed by methods: methods for performing experiments, analyzing data, testing hypotheses, and writing scientific papers. This course frames the philosophical and historical debates about scientific methods and introduces the conceptual tools to discuss and reflect on the rules and procedures that make the pursuit of knowledge scientific. (3 credit hours.)
    • Covers the debates about the view that science is (or ought to be) value-free and the roles that values play (or should play) in science. The course includes historical perspectives, but the emphasis will be on current issues and urgent questions about science in society — questions concerning regulation, responsibility, reliability and sustainability. (3 credit hours.)
  3. Research Ethics. Document with the Department of History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine that you have completed the following no-credit courses/workshops through the IU Office of Research Compliance:
    • Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)
    • Human Subject Research
  4. Tool Skill. One (1) course from the .
    • Any of the following Statistics courses:
      • R: To be successful in this course, students should have an understanding of basic algebra.. CJUS-K 300 covers the properties of single variables, the measurement of association between pairs of variables, and statistical inference. Additional topics, such as the analyses of qualitative and aggregated data, address specific criminal justice concerns. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370, ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300, MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300, PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201; and MATH-M 118 or consent of instructor. R: ECON-E 202 or ECON-S 202 and MATH-M 119. Lectures emphasize the use of basic probability concepts and statistical theory in the estimation and testing of single parameter and multivariate relationships. In computer labs, using Microsoft Excel, each student calculates descriptive statistics, probabilities, and least squares regression coefficients in situations based on current business and economic events. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370; ANTH-A 306; CJUS-K 300; MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310; POLS-Y 395; PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310; SOC-S 371; STAT-K 310 or STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303; or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201; and MATH-M 118 or consent of instructor; Honors student. R: MATH-M 119 and ECON-E 202 or ECON-S 202. Honors course. Designed for students of superior ability. Covers same core material as ECON-E 370 and substitutes for ECON-E 370 as a prerequisite for other courses. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370; ANTH-A 306; CJUS-K 300; MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310; POLS-Y 395; PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310; SOC-S 371; STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303; or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to methods and statistics used in political inquiry, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, sampling, statistical inference and hypothesis testing, measures of association, analysis of variance, and regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: One of MATH-M 106, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-M 212, MATH-S 211, MATH-S 212, MATH-V 118, or, MATH-V 119. Introduction to statistics; nature of statistical data; ordering and manipulation of data; measures of central tendency and dispersion; elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduces the logic of statistical inference. Students will learn how to use sample data to reach conclusions about a population of interest by calculating confidence intervals and significance tests. Estimating the effects of multiple independent variables using cross-tabulations and/or regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, STAT-K 310 or STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301, SOC-S 371, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 119 or equivalent. Introduction to probability and statistics. Elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation, hypothesis testing, Bayesian inference, statistical decision theory. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Math-M 118 or equivalent. Introduction to methods for analyzing data arising in business, designed to prepare business students for the Kelley School’s Integrative Core. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models, fundamental principles of estimation and hypothesis testing, applications to linear regression and quality control. Microsoft Excel used to perform analyses. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Mastery of high school algebra; or MATH-M 014. Introduction to methods for analyzing data arising in the life sciences, designed for biology, human biology, and pre-medical students. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models, fundamental principles of estimation and hypothesis testing, inferences about means, correlation, linear regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to general principles, goals, and objectives of museum practice. Museum history, administrative organization, physical plant design, restoration, acquisition, exhibit, and educational programs. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 202, PHYS-P 222, or PHYS-H 222; or consent of instructor. Telescopes, astronomical imaging, spectroscopic and photometric observations, and reductions. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Topics in astrophysics not covered extensively by other courses. The topic will vary depending on instructor. Possible topics include the solar system, celestial mechanics, astrobiology, stellar interiors, stellar atmospheres, stellar populations, galaxy dynamics, and cosmology. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • P or C: BIOL-L 112. R: BIOL-L 111. Laboratory experiments in various aspects of biology, with a focus on investigative logic and methods. Introduces aspects of cell biology, genetics, and evolutionary biology. Should not be taken during first semester of residence unless credit has been earned for both BIOL-E 111 and BIOL-E 112. Credit given for only one of BIOL-H 112 or BIOL-L 113. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Two semesters of college chemistry. R: BIOL-L 211. Does not count as an upper-level lab in the Biology B.A. major or Biology B.S. degree. Audio-tutorial laboratory of exercises and demonstrations to yield proficiency in principles and techniques of cultivation and utilization of microorganisms under aseptic techniques. Credit given for only one of BIOL-M 255 or BIOL-M 315. (2 credit hours.)
    • R: Mastery of two years of high school algebra or the equivalent. Students will learn to write simple computer programs. Programming assignments will focus on the implementation of an important class of models from cognitive science, such as neural networks or production systems. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: COGS-Q 260, CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, or CSCI-H 211 with a grade of B or higher. Develop computer programming skills, learn to write programs that simulate cognitive processes, and run experiments with human subjects. The relation between computation and intelligence and a selection of approaches from artificial intelligence will be explored. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: Mastery of two years of high school algebra or the equivalent. An introduction to the suite of mathematical and logical tools used in the cognitive and information sciences, including finite mathematics, automata and computability theory, elementary probability, and statistics, together with short introductions to formal semantics and dynamical systems. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 350 or COGS-Q 250. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: COGS-Q 260, CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, of CSCI-H 211 with a grade of B or higher. R: Mastery of two years of high school algebra or the equivalent; PSY-K 300 or equivalent familiarity with statistics. This course develops tools for studying mind and intelligence, including experimental techniques, and mathematical and computational models of human behavior. Topics include neural structures for cognition, attention, perception, memory, problem solving, judgment, decision making, and consciousness. Students will design and analyze laboratory experiments and apply formal models to the results. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 270 or COGS-Q 370. (4 credit hours.)
    • This course examines the construction of social meaning associated with mediated messages as well as the range of uses and consequences of exposure to mediated messages in individuals, groups, organizations, and society. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 213 or TEL-T 205. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Design and execution of simple experiments, treatment of results, search of the literature, and preparation of experimental reports. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 211; and PSY-P 304 or PSY-P 320; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Research methodology in the study of social behavior. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Experiments with and demonstrations of contemporary approaches in behavioral neuroscience. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 211; and PSY-P 315 or PSY-P 316; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Research methods in developmental psychology and their application to selected problems in the development of humans and of nonhuman species. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Laboratory experience in all facets of a neuroimaging experiment, including experimental design, data acquisition, data analysis, data interpretation, and data presentation. Introductory magnetic resonance (MR) physics and the physiology of blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) changes are included. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 211; and PSY-P 325 or PSY-P 335; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Experimental study of human learning and cognitive processes. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-K 300 or equivalent; and PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Surveys the principles/practice of human brain electrical activity recording techniques used in research and in the clinic, including electroencephalography (EEG) and event related potentials (ERPs). Primarily hands-on lab learning, small group recording practice and subsequent data analysis, supplemented by lectures, seminars, discussions and demonstrations. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. R: BIOL-L 211. Laboratory course designed to provide the advanced undergraduate with training in molecular techniques useful for studying the nervous system. Techniques will include PCR, subcloning, bacterial transformation, mammalian cell transfection, working with fluorescent proteins, RNA interference, Western blotting and sectioning/staining brain tissues. (3–4 credit hours.)
    • Other courses may be selected in consultation with the student's academic advisor and with approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies
  5. Elective. One (1) course from the .
    • From primitive humans to the present: survey of medical concepts, systems of health care, and the social relations of physician and patient. (3 credit hours.)
    • Studies the history of the discovery of radioactivity through the development of the first atomic bomb. Weighs risks and benefits of nuclear power and radioactivity in the age of climate change, alternative power sources and medical technology. Emphasizes the methodological, political, and moral challenges of judging risks and making decisions about human health and environmental safety. (3 credit hours.)
    • Critical and historical evaluation of a wide range of occult topics: superstitions, magic, witchcraft, astrology, the Cabala, psychic phenomena (mesmerism, spiritualism, ESP), and UFOs. (3 credit hours.)
    • Acquaints learners with the logical limits of computation and with their migration into physics from the framework of the foundations of mathematics within which they were originally conceived. (3 credit hours.)
    • Introduction to foundational concepts in statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, special relativity and general relativity. Discussion of philosophical issues concerning the nature of the material world and the process of scientific inquiry. Emphasis on developing writing skills and the ability to present complex ideas clearly and critically. (3 credit hours.)
    • The outcome of scientific research informs and shapes our society and culture at all levels. This course explores how science engages with the public, how the public engages with science, and how the relation between science and the public has changed over time. (3 credit hours.)
    • The history of public health and medicine from ancient to modern times. Addresses a selection of historical, philosophical and ethical problems including medical understandings of the body; ideas about the nature and causes of disease, from "airs" and "humors" to germs to genetic predispositions; assessment of risks and liabilities. (3 credit hours.)
    • Examines cultural, historical and philosophical issues involving the use of still and moving images in science. Are pictures necessary? For what? How do pictures represent? How do they get designed, used and understood? What can pictures represent or communicate? Can they equally represent facts and values? How do they work as evidence, or as tools for thinking? What is the role of film in science and science in film? (3 credit hours.)
    • R: Knowledge of modern biology or European or American history . Advanced undergraduate survey of key figures and pivotal moments in the history of biology that have re-defined its scientific character by either opening new lines of inquiry and explanation, developing new kinds of instruments, practices, and institutions, or changing the social role of the biological scientist. Credit given for only one of HPSC-X 308 or HPSC-X 408. (3 credit hours.)
    • Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, and Enlightenment. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Junior standing or consent of instructor. . R: at least one course sequence in Western history (such as HIST-H 103 and HIST-H 104). Growth of quantitative methods in physical science and experimental methods in physical science and experimental methods in natural history. Gradual separation of science from philosophy and theology. (3 credit hours.)
    • How do people conceptualize and write about their mental trauma and psychological distress? Personal narratives of depression, aphasia, head injury, and other forms of neurological damage and emotional affliction are examined from a variety of perspectives and considered for their contribution to clinical science, rehabilitative services, and popular understanding of limits to human experience. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Junior standing or consent of instructor. R: one course in philosophy or philosophy of science. Science claims to tell us what the world is like, even the part of the world we cannot see, and to explain why things happen the way they do. But these claims are controversial. This course examines competing models of scientific explanation and the ongoing debate over whether scientific theories should or even can be interpreted realistically. (3 credit hours.)
  6. Capstone. One (1) course from the .
    • Students select one scientific episode (past or current) related to the student's major and produce an account that illustrates an important methodological or epistemological issue. The final product will be a research paper or creative activity (e.g. a web-based presentation). (3 credit hours.)
  7. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 9 credit hours in the minor must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the minor.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the minor—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to minor requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.