Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Arts in African American and African Diaspora Studies (AAADBA)Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Bachelor of Arts in African American and African Diaspora Studies (AAAD) examines the experiences of people of African descent in the United States and throughout the world. As a humanistic discipline in the democratic tradition, African American and African Diaspora Studies dispels myths and exposes those attitudes that perpetuate racism in American life. Students in AAAD study art, literature, film, folklore, music, dance, history, institutions, communities, culture, stratification, movements, or identities.

Graduates from AAAD successfully pursue careers in academics, theatre and drama, music composition, information technology, law, engineering, education, journalism, criminal justice, creative writing, fundraising, politics, social work, business, community organizing, non-profits, health care, the legal profession, banking and technology industries.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 30 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introductory course. One (1) course from the .
    • Required for the major. The culture of blacks in America viewed from a broad interdisciplinary approach, employing resources from history, literature, folklore, religion, sociology, and political science. (3 credit hours.)
  2. African American History. One (1) course from the .
    • History of blacks in the United States. Slavery, abolitionism, Reconstruction, and post-Reconstruction to 1900. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 355 or HIST-A 355. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: AAAD-A 355. 1900 to the present. Migration north, NAACP, Harlem Renaissance, postwar freedom movement. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 356 or HIST-A 356. (3 credit hours.)
  3. African American Literature. One (1) course from the .
    • African American writing before World War II, with emphasis on critical reactions and analyses. Includes slave narratives, autobiographies, rhetoric, fiction, and poetry. (3 credit hours.)
    • R: AAAD-A 379. The black experience in America as it has been reflected since World War II in the works of outstanding African American writers: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. (3 credit hours.)
  4. Senior Seminar. One (1) course from the .
    • P: African American and African Diaspora Studies major; and senior standing. Lecture/discussions on African American studies as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry and scholarship. Students will develop individual or group projects that synthesize their experiences as majors by demonstrating the interrelated nature of the department's concentration areas. (3 credit hours.)
  5. Focal Area. 18 credit hours, at least 9 of which must be at the 300–499 level, to include the following:
    1. Primary Area. Nine (9) credit hours from one of the following :
      • Arts
      • P: Consent of instructor by audition. R: Previous dance training desirable but not essential. Emphasis on ethnic and jazz traditions, although other genres are regularly performed. Repertoire varies from semester to semester. Participation in on- and off-campus concerts, workshops, and lecture demonstrations required. May be repeated individually or in combination with AAAD-A 110 or AAAD-A 120 for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (2 credit hours.)
      • Open to summer Groups Program students only. Through a musical/theatrical piece chosen for study and performance, students are encouraged to explore and develop their abilities and to experience growth and motivation that comes from participating in a unified and motivating group experience. (2 credit hours.)
      • The ensemble performs music composed by, for and about blacks, including spirituals, gospel, art songs, and excerpts from operas and musicals. Repertoire varies from semester to semester. Participation in on- and off-campus concerts, workshops, and lecture demonstrations required. No audition required. Students meet the first day of class prepared to sing. Vocal evaluations and part assignments will be done during class. Ability to read music is desirable but not essential. May be repeated individually or in combination with AAAD-A 100 or AAAD-A 120 for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (2 credit hours.)
      • An exploration of the relationships among musics of West and Central African people and their descendants in the United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Emphasis placed on the conceptual and aesthetic continuities between musical expression in Old and New World contexts—a uniformity which exists because of shared African cultural ancestry. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 112, FOLK-E 112, or FOLK-F 112. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Consent of instructor by audition. Introduces the richness and depth of black popular tradition through authentic performance practices. Repertoire varies from semester to semester. Participation in on- and off-campus concerts, workshops, and lecture demonstrations required. Ability to read music desirable but not essential. May be repeated individually or in combination with AAAD-A 100 or AAAD-A 110 for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (2 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to the history, culture, music, and body movements of dances in the African American and African Diaspora tradition with a focus on African-derived dances, primarily from Cuba, Puerto Rico, and America. Instruction through classroom lectures, discussions, videos, readings, and movement sessions. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines black female creativity in the United States from colonial times through the present. Studies art and creativity under slavery, nineteenth-century pioneering artists, racial and gender stereotypes in visual culture, the Harlem Renaissance, WPA art, civil rights and Black Power movements, feminist art, abstraction, conceptual and performance art, vernacular art, postmodernism, and black feminist futurism. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines representations of racial identity in American visual culture from the colonial period through the present. Focuses on evolving conceptions of European American, Native American, African American, Asian American, and Mexican American identities. Considers the political and social climate in which art was made, its consumption, and its place within existing histories. (3 credit hours.)
      • Investigates the complex relationship between photography and the African Diaspora from the invention of photography in 1839 through the present. Focuses on a range of photographic genres. Provides historical and theoretical reflections on photography of and by black people by considering the political and social climate in which these images were made, their consumption, and their place within existing histories. Emphasizes image making in the United States with occasional reference to African and European photography. (3 credit hours.)
      • Images of blacks in films, mainly American, from before "The Birth of a Nation" (1915) to the 1950s. Course will include segments as well as complete feature films (also "race films" when available), shorts, cartoons, and documentaries viewed in historical perspective. (3 credit hours.)
      • Problems raised by proliferation of films acted, authored, directed, and/or produced by blacks. Exploration of legitimacy of "black film aesthetic" and its reception by various segments of the black community. (3 credit hours.)
      • Images of blacks as reflected in American drama from 1767 to 1945. Selected dramas of both white and black playwrights, such as Isaac Bickerstaffe, William Wells Brown, Eugene O'Neill, and Richard Wright, who depicted blacks on the stage. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 283 or AAAD-A 383. (3 credit hours.)
      • Survey of cultural, social, and political attitudes that influenced blacks in the development of and participation in blues, jazz, urban black popular music, and "classical" music. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines rap music and hip hop culture as artistic and sociocultural phenomena with emphasis on historical, cultural, economic, and political contexts. Topics include the coexistence of various hip hop styles, their appropriation by the music industry, and controversies resulting from the exploitation of hip hop as a commodity for national and global consumption. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 295, FOLK-E 295, or FOLK-F 295. (3 credit hours.)
      • A chronological survey of Black popular music from 1945-2000: rhythm and blues, soul, funk, disco, hip hop, and their derivative forms. Emphasis placed on the context for evolution and the contributions of African Americans to the development of a multi-billion dollar music industry. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 297, AAAD-A 397, FOLK-E 297, FOLK-F 397, or MUS-M 397. (3 credit hours.)
      • Acquaints students with dancers and choreographers from the African American and African Diaspora who choose to communicate historical, political, recreational, and social themes through the modern, jazz, ballet, tap, and traditional (African and Caribbean) forms of dance and the expressive nature of movement from the black perspective and experience. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the historical and contemporary portrayals of African Americans in Hollywood and in independent narrative film focusing on the social and political functions of film, its legitimization of race, and its oppositional formations, interventions, and practices. Considers how film mediates and interrogates race and social relations in American society. (3 credit hours.)
      • Considers visual artistic production (painting, sculpture, photography, and film) during the Harlem or "New Negro" Renaissance, a period in which African American artists sought radical reconceptualizations of self and community through visual and literary expression. (3 credit hours.)
      • Considers visual artistic production (painting, sculpture, photography, and film) during the American Civil Rights and Black Power Movements. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: AAAD-A 120. Focuses on music industry concerns related to the ensemble's live presentations of Black popular music. Explores how Black popular music is manifested within the broader context of the music industry. Readings explore music industry structures and practices (copyright law, publishing, creative production, etc.) that directly impact African American artists' creative output and livelihood. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours individually or in combination with AAAD-A 338 and AAAD-A 339. (2 credit hours.)
      • P: AAAD-A 100. Students learn dance technique and experience performance from the perspective of the African American and African diaspora. Students perform in choreographic works created by the director and in works produced from student collaborative projects. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours individually or in combination with AAAD-A 337 and AAAD-A 339. (2 credit hours.)
      • P: AAAD-A 110. Through meetings with the instructor, students may complete a research project, and develop advanced-level choral leadership skills in vocal techniques, advanced sight reading, and intermediate piano skills. Students will organize and perform in small ensembles to demonstrate their abilities to perform Black choral music. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours individually or in combination with AAAD-A 337 and AAAD-A 338. (2 credit hours.)
      • P: Junior or senior standing. Examines rap music as artistic and sociological phenomena with emphasis on its historical and political contexts. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 345, AAAD-A 489, FOLK-F 345, or FOLK-F 389. (3 credit hours.)
      • A survey of the artistic traditions of the African in the New World, from the period of slavery in North and South America through contemporary African American and expatriate black American artists. (3 credit hours.)
      • A study in cross-cultural stereotyping as evidenced in the film medium. Analysis of Native American, Asian, black, Hispanic, and Jewish groups. Features, shorts, and animations screened to illustrate the "classic" stereotypes of each group and to demonstrate their impact on American society. (3 credit hours.)
      • Images of blacks as reflected in American drama from 1945 to the present. Emphasis on the contributions of black playwrights such as Lorraine Hansberry, Langston Hughes, Imamu Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones), Ted Shine, and Ed Bullins. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: AAAD-A 283, AAAD-A 379, AAAD-A 380, AAAD-A 383, or AAAD-A 384; or consent of instructor. Contributions of blacks to the theatre in America. Reading and discussion of selected dramas and critiques with opportunities for involvement in the oral interpretation of one or more of the plays. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course surveys the development of Motown Record Corporation, Detroit Era (1959-1972). Through lecture, discussion, guided listening, and visual experiences, the course studies the musical works, creative processes, business practices, historical events, media, technology, and sociocultural factors that contributed to Motown's identity as a unique artistic and cultural phenomenon. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 388, AAAD-A 389, or FOLK-E 388. (3 credit hours.)
      • Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 393 or MUS-M 393. (3 credit hours.)
      • A chronological survey of sacred and secular African American musical traditions in North America from the African past to the present. Emphasis placed on context for evolution, musical processes and aesthetics, interrelationships among genres and musical change, issues of gender, and music as resistance. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 394, FOLK-E 394, or MUS-M 394. (3 credit hours.)
      • A survey of contemporary jazz and soul (rhythm and blues) music and musicians in the United States. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 395 or MUS-M 395. (3 credit hours.)
      • A study of black music and musicians in the United States with emphasis on the black composer in contemporary music. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 396 or MUS-M 396. (3 credit hours.)
      • Historical and critical overview of films produced by African American women from the 1940s to the present. The course emphasizes how black women filmmakers combine their creative abilities with a desire to capture dominant issues that affect black women's lives in America. (3 credit hours.)
      • An in-depth investigation of Negro spirituals and gospel music, with some treatment of the traditions of lining-out and shape note singing. Examination of genres will address and integrate both the musical and the sociocultural perspectives. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 496 or FOLK-E 496. (3 credit hours.)
      • Literature
      • Examines historical texts and introduces them and tropes emphasized by writers to articulate issues of freedom, identity, and salvation as perceived by blacks in diaspora communities. Teaches students how to relate literary works to historical and cultural contexts and how to think critically about ideas, images, and master narratives as presented by African American writers and writers of the black diaspora. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines recent literary texts and introduces students to transnational themes and tropes emphasized by black writers to articulate issues of freedom, identity, and salvation; utilizes interdisciplinary methods to teach students how to appreciate literary artistry; relate literary works to historical and cultural contexts; and think critically about ideas, images, and master narratives as presented by African American writers and writers of the black diaspora. (3 credit hours.)
      • Representative African American writings including poetry, short story, sermons, novels, and drama. (3 credit hours.)
      • A survey of autobiographies written by black Americans in the last two centuries. The course emphasizes how the autobiographers combine the grace of art and the power of argument to urge the creation of genuine freedom in America. (3 credit hours.)
      • An examination of black poetry from Dunbar to the present, emphasizing the emergence, growth, and development of black consciousness as a positive ethnic identification. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: AAAD-A 379 or AAAD-A 380. Analysis of the African American novel from the Harlem Renaissance to the present: genesis, development, and current trends. Emphasis on traditions arising out of the black experience and on critical perspectives developed by black critics and scholars. (3 credit hours.)
      • History, Culture, and Social Issues
      • P: Groups student; and residence in Atkins Living Learning Center. Examines the impact of African American history and culture on the nation as a whole and on the international community. (1 credit hour.)
      • Exploration of the development of racism and racial ideologies in the United States, the Caribbean, Latin America, and South America from colonial times to the present. Emphasizes the interaction among cultural, political, and economic factors in shaping patterns of conflict and collaboration, domination and resistance. (3 credit hours.)
      • A comparative perspective on American race relations, specifically the similarities and differences of the struggles against Jim Crow in America and against apartheid in South Africa. In both places, the late twentieth century witnessed a revolt against the legal and philosophical framework of white supremacy. (3 credit hours.)
      • A comparative study of the cultural, historical, and socioeconomic life patterns of African Americans and Diaspora-based Africans in the United States. (3 credit hours.)
      • The course will explore black participation in the formal structures of American government and in the processes by which these structures are accessed. Black participation in local, state, and federal government arenas will be focused upon, and the political benefits to the black community of these involvements will be assessed. (3 credit hours.)
      • Interdisciplinary examination of salient aspects of black women's history, identity, and experience, including policies, cultural assumptions, and knowledge systems that affect black women's lives. While the primary focus is North America, the lives of black women in other cultural settings within the African Diaspora are also examined. (3 credit hours.)
      • Communicative experiences of black Americans, including black dialect, language and ethnicity, interracial communication, recurring themes, spokespersons in black dialogue, and sociohistorical aspects of black language and communication. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 238 or CMCL-C 238. (3 credit hours.)
      • An interdisciplinary study of how members of four minority groups—Native Americans, Asian Americans, blacks, and Hispanics—combine their struggle for social justice with their desire to maintain their own concepts of identity. (3 credit hours.)
      • The church's role as a black social institution from slavery to the present, its religious attitudes as expressed in songs and sermons, and its political activities as exemplified in the minister-politician. (3 credit hours.)
      • A seminar, primarily designed for sophomores and juniors, directed toward critical analysis of selected topics germane to the future socioeconomic and political position of African Americans. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examination of the historical participation and contributions of African Americans in sport. Students study African American sports pioneers and the social conditions affecting their participation. Period studied includes pre-slavery to the civil rights era (1500 to 1960s). (3 credit hours.)
      • The impact of African American sports heroes, famous teams, and annual sporting events on the shaping of African American culture and the combating of American racism. (3 credit hours.)
      • African American culture in the United States viewed in terms of history (antebellum to present) and social change (rural to urban). Use of oral traditions and life histories to explore aspects of black culture and history. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 292, AAAD-A 392, or FOLK-F 354. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: 3 credit hours of literature. The common and divergent experiences of African-American, Afro-Caribbean, and African travelers to the "City of Light," from eighteenth-century New Orleans Creoles to twenty-first-century youth of African descent, as seen through literature, performance, film, and other arts. Issues of colonization, expatriation, immigration, exile, the Harlem Renaissance and "negritude," race and diaspora, transnationalism. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 304 or CMLT-C 363. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course is an interdisciplinary and comparative study of historical, cultural, and political issues related to Africa and the African Diaspora (the Americas and Europe). Emphasis will also be on team teaching using IUB faculty. Course will be of interest to students in all university departments and schools. (3 credit hours.)
      • Comparative colloquium that explores the recent literature on racial connections between "the local" and "the global" in contemporary American experience. Through immersion in the new "transnational" critiques of the United States, students analyze texts that describe African, Asian, European, indigenous, and Latino sensibilities about culture, homelands, belonging, and exclusion. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines several aspects of the classical, indigenous, and modern political/social bondage. (3 credit hours.)
      • A research seminar, primarily designed for juniors and seniors, directed toward critical analysis of selected topics germane to the future socioeconomic and political position of African Americans. Reading and discussion of relevant texts, studies, and articles. Includes theory construction, research design, and data collection. (3 credit hours.)
      • Legal evolution of civil rights and analysis of specific relevant legal decisions that stimulated social change (the role of slavery, racial segregation, inequality of educational opportunity, and voting laws). (3 credit hours.)
      • Examination of the history, development, and manifestation of feminist consciousness among African American women. The course is particularly concerned with how black women's lived experience defines that consciousness, and the differing impact it has among various groups of black women, and in their larger social, political, and cultural communities. (3 credit hours.)
      • Explores the process, patterns, and paradoxes of the incorporation of individuals and groups identified and/or perceived as "immigrants" from a comparative-interdisciplinary perspective. Focuses on persons from "sending" countries in Africa, the Caribbean, and Asia to the United States. Also examines developments in other labor-importing, postindustrial countries such as France and England in relation to the people who settle there. (3 credit hours.)
      • Consequences of the black diaspora in North America; shifting views of blacks toward their native continent; analysis of current geographic, economic, and political relationships. (3 credit hours.)
      • Advanced study and analysis of selected issues and problems within the African American and African Diaspora experience utilizing interdisciplinary interpretation through analytical reasoning and philosophical discussions. Varied topics primarily in the areas of history, politics, sociology, anthropology, and economics. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Advanced study and analysis of selected issues and problems within the African American and African Diaspora experience utilizing interdisciplinary interpretations through analytical reasoning and philosophical discussions. Varied topics primarily in the areas of dance, music, film, theatre and drama, and literature. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the fight for civil rights by protest organizations such as Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, and Congress of Racial Equality; the emergence of black leaders such as King, Farmer, and Malcolm X; the challenge posed by Black Power advocates in the Black Panthers and Black Muslims; and the changes in American society made by the black revolution. (3 credit hours.)
      • An examination of the historical roles, structures, the impact of black protest strategies, and the origins of black movements to assess their impact on communities in Africa and in the diaspora. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examination of the influence of race, gender, and class from a perspective of power and culture. Use of interdisciplinary sources, including essays, fiction, art, and social science research to examine how different social groups vie for representation, self-definition, and power in different social and cultural settings. (3 credit hours.)
      • Histories, theories, policies, and citizen, state, corporate, nonprofit sector models of transforming past and present societies divided by race, ethnicity, gender, class, caste, tribe, and religion through restorative and distributive justice movements and policies such as civil rights, affirmative action, reparations, and reconciliation tribunals. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the economic, social, cultural and political development of black families residing primarily in rural areas of southern US prior to 1970. Primary attention given to institutional development, race relations, population, and migration. (3 credit hours.)
      • A survey study of national, cultural, and cross-cultural persuasion in theory and practice. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 427 or CMCL-C 427. (3 credit hours.)
      • Focuses on crime reporting in America, addressing the question of whether or not the media distort the picture of crime. In particular, this course explores the mass media treatment of African Americans in the coverage of crime. (3 credit hours.)
      • Education of black Americans and its relationship to the African American experience. Trends and patterns in the education of black Americans as they relate to the notions of education "for whom and for what." (3 credit hours.)
      • Contemporary racial problems in American society with regard to law and constitutional principles of basic freedoms and associated conflicts. Effects of societal norms and impact of racism. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Other Areas. 3 credit hours from each of the other two focal areas above (6 credit hours total).
    3. Elective. Three (3) additional credit hours of AAAD coursework from any focal area.
  6. Additional requirements.
    • No more than six (6) credit hours at the 100–199 level.
    • No more than six (6) credit hours at the 200–299 level
  7. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Arts requirements

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines. No more than 42 of these credit hours can come from the major.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 42 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.