Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Arts in in Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASTPHYSBA)Department of Astronomy

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Bachelor of Arts in Astronomy and Astrophysics is for a student who enjoys astronomy; likes to be challenged; enjoys solving puzzles; wants to pursue other interests and talents outside of astronomy; desires flexibility and choice in major requirements; has strong analytical skills and wants to develop them further; and wants to keep options open for a variety of career fields. It is designed for students who are interested in astronomy as the subject of a liberal arts education, or as a background in the physical sciences for a wide range of career possibilities such as teaching, journalism, law or government or public policy, medicine, science writing and science in the media, visualization, and business.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 55 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Mathematics Core.
    1. Calculus I. One (1) course from the .
      • R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 025 or MATH-M 027. Introduction to calculus. Primarily for students from business and the social sciences. Credit given for only one of MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus, and trigonometry as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 027. Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications. A student may receive credit for only one of the following: MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: Hutton Honors College membership or consent of department. R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus and trigonometry as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 027. Designed for students of outstanding ability, who are considering further study in mathematics. Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications, with emphasis placed on theory. Credit given for only one of MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-S 211, or MATH-V 119. (4 credit hours.)
    2. Calculus II. One (1) course from the .
      • P: MATH-M 119 or MATH-V 119. A continuation of MATH-M 119 covering topics in elementary differential equations, calculus of functions of several variables and infinite series. Intended for non-physical science students. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 120 or MATH-M 212. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 211 or MATH-S 211; or consent of department. Techniques of integration (by parts, trigonometric substitutions, partial fractions), improper integrals, volume, work, arc length, surface area, infinite series. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 120 or MATH-M 212. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-S 211 or consent of department. Includes material of MATH-M 212 and supplemental topics. Designed for students of outstanding ability in mathematics. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212. (4 credit hours.)
  2. Physics Core.
    1. Physics I. One (1) course from the .
      • R: Mastery of high school trigonometry; or MATH-M 026. Newtonian mechanics, wave motion, heat, and thermodynamics. Application of physical principles to related scientific disciplines, especially life sciences. Intended for students preparing for careers in the life sciences and the health professions. Three lectures, one discussion section, and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Credit given for only one of PHYS-H 221, PHYS-P 201, or PHYS-P 221. (5 credit hours.)
      • C: MATH-M 211 or consent of instructor. First semester of a three-semester, calculus-based sequence intended for science majors. Three lectures, two discussion sections, and one 2-hour lab each week. Physics majors are encouraged to take PHYS-P 221 in the fall semester of the freshman year. Newtonian mechanics, oscillations and waves, heat and thermodynamics. Credit given for only one of PHYS-H 221, PHYS-P 201, or PHYS-P 221. (5 credit hours.)
      • P: Consent of department. P or C: MATH-M 211 or equivalent. First semester of a calculus-based sequence in introductory physics, intended primarily for highly motivated and well prepared students. Covers the material of P221 and supplementary topics. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of PHYS-H 221, PHYS-P 201, or PHYS-P 221. (5 credit hours.)
    2. Physics II. One (1) course from the .
      • P: PHYS-H 221, PHYS-P 201, PHYS-P 221, or high school equivalent. Three lectures, one discussion section, and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Electricity and magnetism; geometrical and physical optics; introduction to concepts of relativity, quantum theory, and atomic and nuclear physics. Credit given for only one of PHYS-H 222, PHYS-P 202, or PHYS-P 222. (5 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-H 221 or PHYS-P 221; or PHYS-P 201 and consent of instructor. C: MATH-M 212 or consent of instructor. Second semester of a three-semester, calculus-based sequence intended for science majors.Three lectures, two discussion sections, and one 2-hour lab each week. Physics majors are encouraged to take PHYS-P 222 in the spring semester of the freshman year. Primarily electricity, magnetism, and geometrical and physical optics. Credit given for only one of PHYS-H 222, PHYS-P 202, or PHYS-P 222. (5 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-H 221; or PHYS-P 221 and consent of department. Second semester of a calculus-based sequence in introductory physics, intended primarily for highly motivated and well prepared students. Covers the material of PHYS-P 222 and supplementary topics. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of PHYS-H 222, PHYS-P 202, or PHYS-P 222. (5 credit hours.)
    3. Physics III. One (1) course from the .
      • P: PHYS-H 222 or PHYS-P 222; or PHYS-P 202 and consent of instructor. Third semester of a three-semester, calculus-based sequence.Intended for science and mathematics majors. Three lecture-discussion periods each week. Special theory of relativity; introduction to quantum physics; atomic, nuclear, condensed matter, and elementary particle physics. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-H 222 or PHYS-P 222; or PHYS-P 202 and consent of instructor. Introduces principles and concepts related to radioactive decay, interactions of ionizing radiation with matter, dosimetry and the human health effects of exposure to ionizing radiation; reviews fundamental concepts of atomic and sub-atomic processes, modern physics, Special Theory of Relativity, wave/particle duality and the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. (3 credit hours.)
  3. Astronomy Core.
    1. General Astronomy I. One (1) course from the .
      • R: Mastery of high school algebra and trigonometry; or MATH-M 025 and MATH-M 026. For physical science majors. Introduction to modern astronomy and astrophysics, including basic principles of mechanics, gravity, optics, radiation, and observational and experimental methods. A main theme is to explore how these principles affect the evolution of our scientific understanding of astronomical phenomena. Topics typically include the night sky, planetary bodies, the Sun and our solar system, and stars in our Milky Way galaxy. Credit given for only one of AST-A 201 or AST-A 221. (4 credit hours.)
    2. General Astronomy II. One (1) course from the .
      • R: Mastery of high school algebra and trigonometry; or MATH-M 025 and MATH-M 026. Continuation of AST-A 221. For physical science majors. Application of basic principles of gravity, mechanics, optics, and radiation to modern astronomy and astrophysics. Topics typically include stars, stellar populations, interstellar matter, galaxies, cosmology, and observational astronomy from radio to gamma rays. Credit given for only one of AST-A 202 or AST-A 222. (4 credit hours.)
    3. Modern Observational Techniques. One (1) course from the .
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 202, PHYS-P 222, or PHYS-H 222; or consent of instructor. Telescopes, astronomical imaging, spectroscopic and photometric observations, and reductions. (4 credit hours.)
  4. Advanced Astronomy. Two (2) courses from the .
    • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 202, PHYS-P 222, or PHYS-H 222; or consent of instructor. Problem-solving exercises in stellar astronomy, galaxies, and astronomical spectroscopy. Topics include orbital solutions of binary stars, structure of the Milky Way, and astronomical distance scales. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor . Efficient analysis of quantitative astronomical data requires the use of computers. Helps students build a computational skill set that can be used for carrying out research projects in astronomy/astrophysics or other fields. Covers a range of topics, from the sources of astronomical data to the presentation of the results. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Galactic structure, basic components, kinematics, chemical properties, stellar populations, theories of formation and evolution of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Application of basic physical principles to investigation of the solar system, stars, and the Milky Way galaxy. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Application of basic physical principles to investigation of galaxies and cosmology. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Topics in astrophysics not covered extensively by other courses. The topic will vary depending on instructor. Possible topics include the solar system, celestial mechanics, astrobiology, stellar interiors, stellar atmospheres, stellar populations, galaxy dynamics, and cosmology. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
  5. Advanced Electives. Complete at least five (5) additional credit hours of electives at the 300–499 level selected from the following options:
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 202, PHYS-P 222, or PHYS-H 222; or consent of instructor. Problem-solving exercises in stellar astronomy, galaxies, and astronomical spectroscopy. Topics include orbital solutions of binary stars, structure of the Milky Way, and astronomical distance scales. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST A-222; and consent of instructor. Individualized readings in astronomy and astrophysics. May be taken for a maximum of 6 credit hours in AST-A 390 and AST-X 390. (1–6 credit hours.)
      • P: Written consent of faculty supervisor. Research in astronomy, closely supervised by a faculty member. Projects can be theoretical, experimental, or observational, and may include opportunities to train in the planning and execution of data gathering runs at research telescopes and facilities, and in data mining. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours in AST-X 395 and AST-X 399. (1–6 credit hours.)
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor . Efficient analysis of quantitative astronomical data requires the use of computers. Helps students build a computational skill set that can be used for carrying out research projects in astronomy/astrophysics or other fields. Covers a range of topics, from the sources of astronomical data to the presentation of the results. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Galactic structure, basic components, kinematics, chemical properties, stellar populations, theories of formation and evolution of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Application of basic physical principles to investigation of the solar system, stars, and the Milky Way galaxy. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Application of basic physical principles to investigation of galaxies and cosmology. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Topics in astrophysics not covered extensively by other courses. The topic will vary depending on instructor. Possible topics include the solar system, celestial mechanics, astrobiology, stellar interiors, stellar atmospheres, stellar populations, galaxy dynamics, and cosmology. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 212, MATH-M 213, or MATH-S 212. Elementary concepts of probability and statistics. Combinatorics, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, moments. Statistical inference, point estimation, confidence intervals, test of hypotheses. Applications to social, behavioral, and natural sciences. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 360 or MATH-M 365. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 119 or equivalent. Introduction to probability and statistics. Elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation, hypothesis testing, Bayesian inference, statistical decision theory. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370, ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300, MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300, PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, STAT-S 303, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 212, MATH-S 212, MATH-M 301, MATH-M 303, or MATH-S 303. Basic concepts of data analysis and statistical inference, applied to 1-sample and 2-sample location problems, the analysis of variance, and linear regression. Probability models and statistical methods applied to practical situations using actual data sets from various disciplines. Credit given for only one of STAT-S 320 or STAT-S 350. (3 credit hours.)
      • CSCI-A 321
      • P: CSCI-C 212 and CSCI-C 241. Systematic approach to programming languages. Relationships among languages, properties and features of languages, and the computer environment necessary to use languages. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 596, CSCI-B 521, CSCI-C 311, or CSCI-H 311. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-P 201 and PHYS-P 202; or PHYS-P 221 and PHYS-P 222; and MATH-M 211, MATH-S 211, or equivalent. Computer skills with application to upper-division physical science courses: use of Python as a programming language and Mathematica for symbolic manipulation; data fitting and visualization; numerical and Monte Carlo methods. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-P 301; and CSCI-A 201 or CSCI-A 304; or consent of instructor. Computing methods and techniques applied to a broad spectrum of physics problems. Emphasis on least-squares method and other curve-fitting techniques of nonlinear functions; Monte Carlo methods; data manipulation, including sorting, retrieval, and display. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: CSCI-C 241 and CSCI-C 343. Introduction to database concepts and systems. Topics include database models and systems: hierarchical, network, relational, and object-oriented; database design principles; structures for efficient data access; query languages and processing; database applications development; views; security; concurrency; recovery. Students participate in a project to design, implement, and query a database, using a standard database system. Credit given for only one of CSCI-B 461 or CSCI-B 561. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: CSCI-C 343; and MATH-M 301 or MATH-M 303. Computer graphics techniques. Introduction to graphics hardware and software. Two-dimensional graphics methods, transformations, and interactive methods. Three-dimensional graphics, transformations, viewing geometry, object modeling, and interactive manipulation methods. Basic lighting and shading. Video and animation methods. Credit given for only one of CSCI-B 481 or CSCI-B 581. (4 credit hours.)
      • CSCI-B 351
      • P: Two semesters of computer programming or consent of instructor. Introduction to the design, construction, and control of autonomous mobile robots. This course covers basic mechanics, electronics and programming for robotics, as well as the applications of robots in cognitive science. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 360 or CSCI-B 355. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: ENG-W 231. Offers instruction in preparing technical proposals and reports, with an introduction to the use of graphics. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Completion of the English composition requirement. Advanced writing course focuses on the interconnected activities of writing and reading, especially the kinds of responding, analyzing, and evaluating that characterize work in many fields in the university. Topics vary from semester to semester. (3 credit hours.)
      • (Science Writing) Topical course dealing with changing subjects and material from term to term. May be repeated for credit with different topics in JOUR-J 360 and MSCH-J 360. (1–4 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 212, MATH-M 213, or MATH-S 212; or MATH-M 211 and CSCI-C 241; or MATH-S 211 and CSCI-C 241. Introduction to the theory of real vector spaces. Coordinate s, linear dependence, bases. Linear transformations and matrix calculus. Determinants and rank. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 301, MATH-M 303, or MATH-S 303. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 212, MATH-M 213, or MATH-S 212. Elementary geometry of 2, 3, and n-space; functions of several variables; partial differentiation; minimum and maximum problems; multiple integration. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 212, MATH-M 213, or MATH-S 212. R: MATH-M 301, MATH-M 303, or MATH-S 303. Ordinary differential equations and methods for their solution, including series methods and the Laplace transform. Applications of differential equations. s, stability, and numerical methods. Partial differential equations of mathematical physics, Fourier series. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 343 or MATH-S 343. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 311, MATH-S 311, or consent of instructor. Algebra and geometry of complex numbers, elementary functions of a complex variable, power series, integrations, calculus of residues, conformal mapping. Application to physics. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 415 or MATH-S 415. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 212, MATH-M 213, or MATH-S 212. A study of the central aspects of two-dimensional Euclidean geometry from historical and axiomatic points of view as well as through hands-on and/or computer-based explorations of geometric concepts and constructions. (3 credit hours.)
      • P or C: PHYS-P 301. Fundamental experiments in physics with emphasis on modern physics. The course aims to develop basic laboratory skills and data analysis techniques. (3 credit hours.)
      • P or C: PHYS-P 301. Particle motion in one, two, and three dimensions in the presence of forces; construction of forces from fields, and relationships between fields and sources; energies and potentials; complex oscillations and circuit analysis; classical and quantum mechanical waves and probabilities. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-H 222 or PHYS-P 222; or PHYS-P 202 and consent of instructor; and MATH-M 312 or PHYS-P 321. Electrostatic fields and differential operators, Laplace and Poisson equations, dielectric materials, steady currents, power and energy, induction, magnetic fields, scalar and vector potentials, Maxwell's equations. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-P 331; or consent of instructor. Magnetic materials, wave equations and radiation, energy transfer and conversion. Pointing vector and momentum, retarded potentials, dipole radiation, transmission lines and wave guides, relativity. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-H 222 or PHYS-P 222; or PHYS-P 202 and consent of instructor. P or C: MATH-M 311 or MATH-S 311. Intermediate course, covering three laws of thermodynamics, classical and quantum statistical mechanics, and some applications. (3 credit hours.)
      • Practical electronics as would be encountered in a research laboratory or industrial setting. Both analog (filters, power supplies, transistors, amplifiers, op-amps, comparators, oscillators, transducers including the analysis of circuits using computer-aided techniques) and digital devices (storage elements, discrete gates, and programmable devices). (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-P 222 or PHYS-H 222; or PHYS-P 202 and consent of instructor. P or C: MATH-M 343. Elementary mechanics of particles and rigid bodies, treated by methods of calculus and differential equations. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-P 301 and PHYS-P 309. R: PHYS-P 453 and PHYS-P 454 concurrently. Advanced laboratory for senior physics majors. Experimental investigations and selected topics in nuclear, atomic, and solid state physics. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-P 301 and PHYS-P 331. R: PHYS-P 332 concurrently. The Schroedinger equation with applications to problems such as barrier transmission, harmonic oscillation, and the hydrogen atom. Discussion of orbital and spin angular momentum and identical particles. Introduction to perturbation theory. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 118, MATH-M 211, and MATH-M 303; or consent of instructor. Cross-listed as MATH-M 455. Covers the interdisciplinary field of quantum information science and aims at senior undergraduate and graduate students majoring in computer science, physics, mathematics, philosophy, and chemistry. Quantum Information Science is the study of storing, processing, and communicating information using quantum systems. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 455 and PHYS-P 455. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-P 331 or consent of instructor. Physical optics and electromagnetic waves based on electromagnetic theory, wave equations; phase and group velocity; dispersion; coherence; interference; diffraction; polarization of light and of electromagnetic radiation generally; wave guides; holography; masers and lasers; introduction to optical spectroscopy. (3 credit hours.)
    • Related course approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies
  6. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Arts requirements

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines. No more than 42 of these credit hours can come from the major.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 42 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.