Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Arts in History (HISTBA)Department of History

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Bachelor of Arts in History prepares students to understand our changing world. The history major develops skills and tools for retrieving and interpreting the past—and, in the process, for better understanding the questions and challenges of our own time. Majors are trained to critically interpret sources and stories about the full range of people living in the past to provide an understanding of issues that remain relevant today. In the process of carrying out this work, majors will develop strong research and critical skills, creative methods for recognizing patterns of information, and techniques for clear and persuasive writing—essential skills for success in any career: research, analysis, synthesis, and effective writing. Courses cover a wide range of issues in all time periods and parts of the world. History students learn how change takes place, the tensions and conflicts it causes, and how individuals, groups, and societies change over time.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 30 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introductory course. One (1) course from the .
    • Delves into the ideas, practices, and joys of history common to the study of all places, time periods, and themes.  Emphasis on the skills historians use in research and writing, including interpreting sources, using scholarly resources, and arguing persuasively. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Distribution Courses.
    1. Pre-1750 History. One (1) course from the .
      • This introductory course surveys the history of Native peoples of North America from the earliest times to the present. It seeks to provide students with a broad understanding of Native American history, prepare students for more advanced coursework in Native studies, and enhance students' understanding of colonialism and American history. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course offers an introduction to the history of the European Middle Ages through the study of its heroes. It also teaches skills necessary for students to succeed in any field of history. (3 credit hours.)
      • Between 33 and 1400 C.E., Europeans gradually converted from a variety of other religions to Christianity. Considers both the (scanty) evidence for pre-Christian religions and the narratives of conversion for each region of Europe, focusing on the post-Roman period after 400 C.E. (3 credit hours.)
      • Exploration into the history of witchcraft and witch-hunting primarily in Europe in the early modern period, looking into its background in the medieval period, its persistence in the modern era, and its presence in non-Western regions of the world. Emphasis is on intellectual, social and cultural aspects, with special attention to questions of gender and socio-psychological dynamics. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in the history of the European Middle Ages (200–1500 C.E.). Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in the early Modern Period (1400–1800 C.E.). Topics will vary but usually cut across fields and regions. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Crusading brought western Europeans violently together with Eastern Europeans, Western Asians, and North Africans, reshaping all of the societies it touched. This course examines the impact of crusades on both the crusaders and those crusaded against between the First Crusade and the end of the Middle Ages. (3 credit hours.)
      • Jewish history from 1492 to 1789. Topics include the expulsion from Spain; the Inquisition and the marranos; the society and culture of Italian, Turkish, and Polish Jewry; Court Jews in central Europe; Hasidism in eastern Europe; the Enlightenment; Jews and the French Revolution. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduces the history and civilization of the Byzantine Empire (A.D. 330-1453). Explores the survival of the eastern Roman empire after the "fall" of its western half; how it developed a distinctive culture and ideology; and how it changed in response to economic, political, and military challenges. (3 credit hours.)
      • Evolution of European civilization from the fall of Rome, development of Christianity and the Germanic invasions through Charlemagne's empire and the subsequent development of feudalism, manorialism, papacy, and Romanesque architecture. (3 credit hours.)
      • Expansion of European culture and institutions: chivalry, the Crusades, rise of towns, universities, Gothic architecture, law, revival of central government. Violent changes in late medieval Europe: overpopulation, plague, Hundred Years' War, peasant revolt, crime, inquisition, and heresy. (3 credit hours.)
      • Italian Renaissance as a political and cultural phase in the history of Western civilization. Its roots in antiquity and the Middle Ages; its characteristic expression in literature, art, learning; social transformations; manners and customs. Expansion of the Renaissance into France, Germany, and England. (3 credit hours.)
      • Economic, political, social, and religious background of the Protestant Reformation; Lutheran, Reformed, Anglican, and Anabaptist movements, with reference to their political and theological trends; Catholic Reformation. (3 credit hours.)
      • The Reformation; the Thirty Years' War; absolutism; Baroque culture; the Enlightenment; anti-Semitism and Jewish emancipation; the French Revolution in Germany; Napoleonic Wars and the birth of German nationalism, industrialization and class conflict; the military path to German unification. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduces Islamic civilization from the rise of Islam to 1800 C.E. Topics include pre-Islamic Arabia; the Prophet Muhammed; the Koran; the basic teachings of Islam; the Islamic conquests and the caliphate; and the major aspects of mature Islamic civilization such as law, theology, science and philosophy, mysticism, literature, and art. Credit given for only one of HIST-C 205 or NELC-N 265. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to the history of Sparta—the key events, institutions, leaders, and sources—while focusing on three broad questions: how did the Spartans create their unique society? What costs did their system exact from its people? How has Sparta been seen in contemporary culture? (3 credit hours.)
      • A close, critical and transdisciplinary study of leadership in ancient Greece and Rome—an investigation which intimately involves students in the lives of the leaders themselves as well as in the overriding cultural, political and social frameworks that defined these individuals as 'leaders' in the first place. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of the history of Greece or Rome, the history of Late Antiquity in the Greco-Roman world, or of the Byzantine Empire. Topics will vary in focus, region, and period. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of the history of the Near East, apart from the Greco-Roman World or of the Islamic world. Topics vary but may cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Nearly eight centuries after Rome was founded by outcasts, Julius Caesar was violently murdered by Senators; Rome's massive Mediterranean empire had become a prize worth killing for. Examination of the chain of events in which Rome ascended to superpower status and subsequently abandoned its Republican constitution in favor of autocracy. Credit given for only one of the combination of HIST-C 320 and HIST-C 325 or HIST-C 388. (3 credit hours.)
      • After the death of the Republic, the Romans were ruled by one man, the Princeps-"first among equals". This oxymoronic title exemplifies a contradictory system; a monolithic government ruling a multi-cultural empire. Study of the empire's remarkable rise and fall from the first century B.C. to the fifth century A.D. Credit given for only one of the combination of HIST-C 320 and HIST-C 325 or HIST-C 388. (3 credit hours.)
      • An introductory survey of early Greek history, beginning with the rise and fall of the Minoans and Mycenaeans of the Bronze Age, then moving on to the rebirth of Greek civilization in the following centuries, ending with Greece's clash with the Persian Empire in the early fifth century B.C. Credit given for only one of HIST-C 376 or HIST-C 386. (3 credit hours.)
      • A survey of ancient Greek history, ranging from the aftermath of the early fifth century B.C. clash with the Persians and subsequent Athenian Empire to the Hellenistic era initiated by the conquests of Alexander the Great. Credit given for only one of HIST-C 377 or HIST-C 387. (3 credit hours.)
      • History of Roman people, from legendary origins to death of Justinian (A.D. 565), illustrating development from city-state to world empire. Evolutionary stages exemplify transition from early kingship to republican forms, finally replaced by monarchy of distinctively Roman type. (3 credit hours.)
      • History of the Roman Empire from the Golden Age of the second century A.D. until the collapse of Roman power in the West (476 A.D.) and the rise of Islam; Christianity and the fate of classical culture in an age of political, social, and religious transformation; the impact of recent archaeological discoveries on "the fall of Rome" as a historical problem. (3 credit hours.)
      • Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to main events and issues in Russian history from earliest times to the Crimean War in the mid-nineteenth century. Covers foundation of a great Slavic state into the Eurasian plain, the Kievan era of early state building, colorful rulers such as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 101, HIST-D 102, or HIST-H 261. (3 credit hours.)
      • Origin of the Hungarian people; settlement of the Danubian basin; adoption of Christianity; formation of Hungarian state; impact of western European civilization and economic system during Middle Ages and Renaissance; effect of Ottoman domination; Ottoman-Habsburg conflict; liberation of Hungary from Turkish rule. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 321 or HIST-D 421. (3 credit hours.)
      • Origins and groupings of peoples of Africa; political, social, and economic evolution to 1750; Africa's contacts with ancient world, trans-Sahara and Indian Ocean trades, growth of states and empires, spread of Islam. Credit given for only one of HIST-E 331 or HIST-E 431. (3 credit hours.)
      • Develops the origins of Islam in West Africa and the ways West Africans incorporated, transformed, and amplified Muslim beliefs and practices throughout history. Credit given for only one of HIST-E 338 or HIST-E 438. (3 credit hours.)
      • History of China's borderlands and its foreign relations. Surveys 2,500 years of history, covering the dynamics that first produced the famous Great Wall frontier, the key shifts in China's relations with the wider world, and the ways these shifts shaped the lives of ordinary people. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to Japan. Society and culture on the Japanese archipelago, from their origins to the high middle ages. Prehistoric Jomon and protohistoric Yayoi. Formation of the Japanese state under the influence of Chinese and Korean models. Heian courtly culture. Ascendancy of military elites and developments in popular culture during Kamakura and Muromachi periods. Credit given for only one of EALC-E337 or HIST-G 357. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to Japan. Samurai culture, expansion of Buddhism, and sectarian violence. High feudalism, unification, and the Tokugawa settlement after 1600. Encounter with European civilization, closed country. Urbanization, social and cultural change, rise of agrarian prosperity in the Edo period to about 1800. Credit given for only one of EALC-E 358 or HIST-G 358. (3 credit hours.)
      • China from its neolithic background through the Qin and Western Han dynasties. Examines the Shang tribal polity, royal and aristocratic phases of the Zhou state, and the creation of the imperial system in the Qin-Han period. Changing patterns of ideology, political legitimacy, and social organization through archaeological and textual sources. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to China. The Chinese empire from the Han through the Tang dynasties (second century B.C. through tenth century A.D.). Relations among demographic patterns. political forms, social classes, economic developments, religious movements, and cultural diversification, investigated through secondary and translated primary sources. Credit given for only one of HIST-G 382 or HIST-G 482. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to China. The Chinese empire from the Song through the middle Qing dynasties (tenth to eighteenth centuries A.D.). Relations among demographic patterns, political forms, social classes, economic developments, philosophical movements, and cultural diversification, investigated through secondary and translated primary sources. Credit given for only one of HIST-G 383 or HIST-G 483. (3 credit hours.)
      • Major developments in European thought during the Renaissance, Reformation, scientific revolution, and Enlightenment; traditional politics, economy, and society and their transformation by enlightened despotism, the French Revolution, and Napoleon. (3 credit hours.)
      • From birth of civilization in Mesopotamia and Egypt until Constantine's conversion to Christianity (337 A.D.). Role of the city in ancient world; nature of imperialism; and impact of Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, and other charismatic leaders. Archaeology as a source for political and social history. (3 credit hours.)
      • European institutions, social and intellectual history from late Roman Empire to Renaissance. Greco-Roman legacy, Christian institutions, Byzantine and Islamic influences, town revival and trade, rise of universities, emergence of national states and literatures. (3 credit hours.)
      • 1492-1850. African, Indian, Spanish, Portuguese heritage. Discovery and conquest. Clash of cultures. Spanish empire. Society, culture, economics, politics. Bourbon reform, independence, new republics. (3 credit hours.)
      • Europe in the age of bubonic plague, 1348-1715, with emphasis on changes in climate, population, food supplies, public health measures, economy, social relations, and religious and artistic responses to disaster. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to African culture; African environment; early humans in Africa; precolonial history; traditional political, economic, and social systems; language, religion, art, music, literature. Credit given for only one of AFRI-L 231 or HIST-H 227. (3 credit hours.)
      • Chronological and comparative survey of the traditional civilizations of East Asia through lectures and readings of source materials (in translation) in literature, history, philosophy, and the arts, with emphasis on the interrelationship among the cultures of East Asia from ancient times to the early modern era. Credit given for only one of EALC-E 251 or HIST-H 237. (3 credit hours.)
      • Survey course which examines some of the important problems and debates current in South Asian history. Topics covered range from the Neolithic period to the present day, and include the nature of ancient South Asian society, medieval Islamic empires, and British imperialism in the region. (3 credit hours.)
      • Topics include the origins of Judaism, Jewish life in ancient Israel and the Diaspora, Judaism and the origins of Christianity, Jewish society and culture under Christian and Muslim rule in the Middle Ages. Credit given for only one of HIST-H 251 or JSTU-J 251. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Post-1750 U.S. or European History. One (1) course from the .
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but are usually broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the history of Asian migration to the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present as part of the making of the "Pacific World." Major themes to be explored include community formation, race, citizenship, nation, and transnationalism. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course will examine the American legal system from the Revolution to the present. It will use trials, judicial opinions, statutes, stories, films, and other materials to study criminal prosecutions, private law suits, constitutional conflicts, and other critical parts of the American legal experience. The basic goals of the course are to help students understand why law has had a powerful role in the development of American society and the consequences of the American reliance on law. (3 credit hours.)
      • Surveys changes in American society from World War II through the 1960s. Using lectures, readings, and films, the course looks at key debates of the times over war, sexuality, patriotism, and the counter-culture and pays attention to pivotal figures like Kinsey, Elvis, Dylan, and John Kennedy. (3 credit hours.)
      • Transformation of pleasures in industrial/post-industrial US, 1860s-present. Nature of different pleasures and ways Americans have experienced and justified them. Particular focus on attempts to regulate and abolish certain forms of enjoyment. Topics include alcohol, eating, prostitution, contraception, pornography, smoking, dancing, amusement parks, vacations, music, movies, television, Christmas and other holidays. (3 credit hours.)
      • When did the United States become an empire? Did it inherit an imperial mindset from Britain? Would it be a different kind of empire, or an alternative to empire? This course explores the history of American political discourse about empire, and the history of American foreign relations throughout the world. (3 credit hours.)
      • A history of childbirth in North America, focusing on birthing women, midwives and doctors, from the 17th century to the present day. (3 credit hours.)
      • From Mary Rowlandson's 1682 bestselling captivity narrative to contemporary films like Avatar, images of Indians have been pervasive in American popular culture. This course explores how America's first people have shaped—and continue to shape—U.S. history, myth, and culture in profound ways. (3 credit hours.)
      • Surveys U.S. women's history from 1820 to the present. Themes include changing ideals of gender and sexuality; women's labor in industrial and postindustrial America; racial, class, ethnic, and regional diversity; and women's participation in religious, political, social reform, and women's rights movements. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines how changing social definitions of masculinity and femininity, and changing attitudes toward sexual behaviors influenced selected issues and events in American history such as the European "discovery" of America, the Industrial Revolution, race relations, the Spanish American War, and the Cold War. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues through the whole of United States history. Topics will vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Political, social and cultural history of the Revolution. What did it take to make a revolution? What did it take to make a nation? How has the revolution lived on in popular memory? Includes strong focus on experience of women and enslaved blacks. (3 credit hours.)
      • Major themes in American cultural life since the Civil War. Focus on the cultural expressions of immigrants, racial minorities, religious groups, social classes, women, artists, and professional groups in response to changing conditions. (3 credit hours.)
      • Social, intellectual, and cultural features of the American South, from English settlement to secession. Emphasis on the development of a distinctive southern regional culture and how it helped shape the buildup to the Civil War. (3 credit hours.)
      • Social, economic, cultural, and political ways in which Americans accommodated and resisted changes introduced by large-scale industrialization. Populism and progressivism receive special attention. (3 credit hours.)
      • Changing living conditions, values, concerns in post-Civil War United States as influenced by rise of the city and seen in experience of rural-urban migrants, ethnic groups, industrial workers, women, blacks. Focus on situations faced by ordinary people, and how present tensions have roots in the past. (3 credit hours.)
      • Changing constitutional system from seventeenth-century colonies to contemporary nation. Structure of government: federalism, division of powers, political institutions. Relationship of government to society and economy. Civil liberties and democracy. Constitutional law and politics, 1607-1865. (3 credit hours.)
      • Evolution of cities and urban life in United States from colonial times to present. Rise of cities (New York, Chicago, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Miami, and others). Creation of modern urban districts (ghettos, suburbia), city planning, political and economic power structures, ethnic and race relations, law and order (crime, police, prisons). (3 credit hours.)
      • The era of the Civil War and its aftermath; military, political, economic, and social aspects of the coming of the war, the war years, and the "reconstruction" era following the conflict. (3 credit hours.)
      • Latino experience in the United States from 1848. Economic and social factors of the Latino role in a non-Latin nation. Credit given for only one of HIST-A 352 or LATS-L 210. (3 credit hours.)
      • History of blacks in the United States. Slavery, abolitionism, Reconstruction, post-Reconstruction to 1900. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 355 or HIST-A 355. (3 credit hours.)
      • History of blacks in the United States 1900 to present. Migration north, NAACP, Harlem Renaissance, postwar freedom movement. Credit given for only one of AAAD-A 356 or HIST-A 356. (3 credit hours.)
      • Indiana history and life, from early human interactions to our own time. Emphasis on the relationship of distinctive regional traits and challenges to broader transformations in American and global culture. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in United States history to 1870. Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues in United States history from 1870 to the present. Topics will vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • The story of America's longest war—the battles, the protests, the movies, and the controversies. The Vietnam War was an epic event, the climax of the Cold War and the high-water mark of American power. Students will learn about the experiences of combatants on both sides, the reasoning behind American strategy, and the history of Vietnam's struggle for independence. The course will also deal with the war's legacies, its place in popular culture, and the war's economic and political aftershocks. Credit given for only one of HIST-A 380 and HIST-H 228. (3 credit hours.)
      • An intensive examination of the decade that tore apart post-World War II American society, beginning with the confident liberalism that believed the nation could "pay any price" and "bear any burden" in order to stop communism abroad and to promote reform at home. Focuses on the internal contradictions and external challenges that destroyed this liberal agenda: civil rights and black power, the New Left, the counterculture, second-wave feminism, the sexual revolution, the Vietnam War, and the globalization of the economy; and finishing with the more conservative order that emerged in the early 1970s to deal with the conflicting realities of limited national power and wealth on the one hand, and rising demands for rights and opportunities on the other. (3 credit hours.)
      • Role of popular music in the social, cultural, political, economic, and technological history of the modern United States. Examines a broad range of musical cultures including rhythm and blues, country, rock and roll, modern jazz, pop, folk, soul, funk, and hip hop. Focus on role of popular music in shaping democracy and power, including class, gender, race, and generation relations. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course examines major issues in the United States between 1815 and 1860. Topics include the market revolution, the expansion of slavery, the "second party system," "Jacksonian democracy," evangelical Christianity, reform movements, and the coming of the Civil War. This course stresses the interconnections between economic, social, cultural, and political developments. (3 credit hours.)
      • The Pacific has been critical to the United States' emergence as a global power over the past 120 years. This course explores the historical problems posed by American ambitions in this region, using case studies such as Hawai'i, Japan, and the Philippines. (3 credit hours.)
      • Considers the changing ways in which various Americans have defined "home." Topics include colonial households, nineteenth-century middle-class homes, "modern" early twentieth-century homes, and post-World War II suburbia. Devotes considerable attention to residences excluded from dominant definitions, including slave cabins, tenements, utopian communities, boardinghouses, apartments, institutions, internment camps, dormitories, and communes. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the debate in America over the meaning of the "American Dream" from the 1950s to the 1980s. Probes how this dispute played out in politics and culture and how various sides were represented by political leaders—and by popular singers. (3 credit hours.)
      • More than 150 years after Darwin wrote On the Origin of Species, many Americans reject evolutionary ideas. Why does the controversy persist? How has it evolved? Why do people care so much about evolution and creation? This course explores these questions through readings, films, discussions, and field trips. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines interactions between sexualities, culture, and science in America from the late seventeenth to twentieth centuries; changes in sexual patterns of indigenes, European settlers, and early immigrants in the later nineteenth century; early twentieth century controversies; and sex researchers' findings on interwar and postwar Americans' sexual histories as published in the Kinsey Reports and successor studies. Credit given for only one of GNDR-G 393 or HIST-A 393. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course examines when, where, how, and why particular stereotypes about African American women were created, and by whom, and how black women grappled with these images and ideas and struggled to create lives and images that reflected their own understandings of liberty, power, equality, rights, citizenship, sexuality, and self. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines life in the American South before 1865 from the perspective of Native Americans, African Americans, and Whites. Centers interracial sex as the genesis of American ideas about race, gender, class and sexuality. Studies how Southerners grappled with issues of race, class, gender and sex, and struggled to create lives that reflected their own understanding of freedom, power, rights, and citizenship. (3 credit hours.)
      • Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • An overview of the development of gender roles in Europe since the French Revolution; development of the private and public spheres; political ideology and women's roles in society; the industrial revolution, Darwinism, imperialism, nationalism, communism and gender roles; feminism and the sexual revolution. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course focuses on the Italian Mafia since 1870 as well as links to the U.S. Mafia. Also considers related areas of Italian "deep politics" (or Italy's Mysteries), including right- and left-wing terror and the strategy of tension. Lecture and discussion plus assorted feature and documentary films. (3 credit hours.)
      • Explores the Nazis' origins, vision, and appeal, and the path to war and destruction. Examines how far the Nazis were able to revolutionize German society, the nature of Nazi violence, the challenges they posed to the international community, and their ultimate failure and defeat. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems across more than one period of Western European history. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in modern European history (1750-present). Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the origins, character, and development of anti-Semitism from the Enlightenment to the post-Holocaust period. Asks whether anti-Semitism is a single phenomenon with a clear tradition and cause, or whether it has varied markedly over time and from country to country. (3 credit hours.)
      • Topics include Emancipation, the Jewish Enlightenment, modern Judaism, Eastern European Jewry, Jewish politics, women in Jewish society, American Jewry, the Holocaust, Israel. (3 credit hours.)
      • Anti-Semitism in imperial and Weimar Germany; the Nazi rise to power; the destruction of European Jewry; Jewish behavior in crisis and extremity; the attitude of the Allied nations; mass murder in comparative historical perspective; theological, moral, and political implications. Credit given for only one of HIST-B 323 or JSTU-J 323. (3 credit hours.)
      • Origins of modern Jewish nationalism in nineteenth-century Europe, creation of a Zionist political movement, varieties of Zionist ideology, alternatives to Zionism, its international diplomatic context, growth of Jewish settlements in the land of Israel, the State of Israel from 1948 to the present. Credit given for only one of HIST-B 324 or JSTU-J 324. (3 credit hours.)
      • Crisis of Old Regime; middle-class and popular revolt; from constitutional monarchy to Jacobin commonwealth; the Terror and revolutionary government; expansion of revolution in Europe; rise and fall of Napoleonic empire. (3 credit hours.)
      • Social, political, and cultural survey of France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (3 credit hours.)
      • Vienna settlement and period of reaction in Europe; liberalism and nationalism; revolutions; industrial revolution, capitalism; socialist movement; unification of Italy and Germany; clericalism and anticlericalism; struggles for political democracy; social legislation; imperialism, nationalist rivalries, and background of World War I. (3 credit hours.)
      • Vienna settlement and period of reaction in Europe; liberalism and nationalism; revolutions; industrial revolution, capitalism; socialist movement; unification of Italy and Germany; clericalism and anticlericalism; struggles for political democracy; social legislation; imperialism, nationalist rivalries, and background of World War I (3 credit hours.)
      • Economic, social, political, and military-diplomatic developments, 1900 to present. I: 1900-1930: origins, impact, and consequences of World War I; peacemaking; postwar problems; international communism and fascism; the Great Depression. II: 1930-present: Depression politics; crisis of democracy; German national socialism; World War II; Cold War; postwar reconstruction and recovery. (3 credit hours.)
      • Economic, social, political, and military-diplomatic developments, 1900 to present. I: 1900-1930: origins, impact, and consequences of World War I; peacemaking; postwar problems; international communism and fascism; the Great Depression. II: 1930-present: Depression politics; crisis of democracy; German national socialism; World War II; Cold War; postwar reconstruction and recovery. (3 credit hours.)
      • A cultural history of Paris and Berlin in the 1920s, focusing on the French avant garde; Dada and surrealism; expressionist painting and cinema; Bauhaus architecture; Brechtian theater; Reichian psychoanalysis; and the American expatriate literature of Stein, Hemingway, and Miller. (3 credit hours.)
      • Risorgimento and unification; liberal Italy and the mutilated victory (WWI); Italian opera; Fascism; alliance with Nazi Germany and defeat (WWII); Christian Democrats v. Communists; major cultural movements; the economic miracle; Mafia, left- and right-wing violence and terrorism; the kickbacks scandal and the Second Republic. (3 credit hours.)
      • Explores the modern history of Western Europe through culture. Examines a series of symbols and myths (literary, musical, journalistic, cinematic, and theatrical) over the past two centuries and through them explores historical, political, and intellectual issues (touching on issues of empire, gender, race, nationalities, etc.). (3 credit hours.)
      • Political/social fault lines of Second German Empire of 1871; imperialism; origins, impacts, and legacies of World War I; achievements/limits of Weimar Republic; rise of Nazis; Nazism in power; World War II and Holocaust; Cold War and division of Germany; politics and culture in the two Germanies, 1949-1990; reunification; contemporary problems. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines transformations of sexuality and erotic lives within modern British history, focusing upon popular culture, demographic trends, sensational crimes and scandals (the Queen Caroline Affair, the Profumo Affair), and controversies over the regulation of sexual behaviors and identities. Concludes with analysis of the slate of 1960s "liberal" legislation on divorce, censorship, abortion, and homosexuality. Credit given for only one of GNDR-G 386 or HIST-B 386. (3 credit hours.)
      • Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to main events and issues in Russian history from the middle of the nineteenth century to present. Covers the great liberating reforms of Tsar Alexander II, the last tsar, Nicholas II, the revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin, the brutal tyrant Joseph Stalin, and the last Communist leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 101, HIST-D 103, or HIST-H 261. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • In recent decades democratically-oriented revolutions have occurred in Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union, Latin America, Africa, East and Southeast Asia, and the Middle East. What accounts for this phenomenon? What common ideas and practices link them? Why were some more successful than others? (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • The revolution in Soviet politics, culture, and daily life wrought by Mikhail Gorbachev (1986-1991) and the end of the Soviet Empire. Examination of selected issues: political structures, family, education, youth, status of women and minorities. Historical roots traced. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 302 or REEI-R 302. (3 credit hours.)
      • Biographies of a number of Russia's most colorful personalities and the times in which they lived; among them, Ivan the Terrible, Pugachev, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Bakunin, Tolstoy, Lenin, Trotsky, Stalin. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study of the history of Jewish life in Eastern Europe. Topics to be discussed will include Hasidism, Kabbalah, shtetl life, Haskalah (the Jewish Enlightenment), Socialism, Yiddish literary traditions, and the Holocaust. (3 credit hours.)
      • Russian empire under Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Napoleon's invasion, expansion across Asia into the Americas, nationalism, war, and revolution. Other topics include daily life of the common people, gender issues, religion, and the emergence of a modern industrial society. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 308 or HIST-D 409. (3 credit hours.)
      • Issues covered include Soviet politics and society on the eve of WWII, prewar diplomacy, the major battles of WWII on the Eastern Front, the Soviet "home front," popular culture, and the impact of WWII on the Soviet Union and on the Soviet Union's international position. (3 credit hours.)
      • Causes and development of Russian revolutions and civil war; Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin; purges, terror, economic development, society, and arts under Stalin; struggle against Hitler; scope and limits of de-Stalinization under Khrushchev; minorities, dissent, and life in the Soviet Union. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 310 or HIST-D 410. (3 credit hours.)
      • A history of one of the most neglected nations in European history, once the breadbasket of the Soviet Union and now one of the largest nations in Europe. Examines issues of national identity and national consciousness and explores the place of Ukraine in Eurasian history. (3 credit hours.)
      • Modernization and rebuilding of Hungary during Habsburg enlightened absolutism; age of reform and the revolution of 1848-1849; compromise of 1867; social and economic transformation of Hungary within the framework of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy; problems of a multinational state; World War I and collapse of historical Hungary. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 322 or HIST-D 422. (3 credit hours.)
      • Decline of the Ottoman Empire. Revolutionary traditions and movements; peasant societies and folk customs; literary and linguistic nationalism; Balkan irredentism. Formation of Serbian (Jugoslav), Greek, Rumanian, Bulgarian, Albanian, and Turkish national states. Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and British influence and imperialism in southeastern Europe and Near East. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 325 or HIST-D 425. (3 credit hours.)
      • Enlightened despotism; Metternichian system; struggle for German unification; Habsburg culture and civilization. German-Austrian, Hungarian, Czechoslovak, South Slavic, Rumanian, and Polish nationalism. Industrialization; Christian socialism and Austro-Marxism; murder at Sarajevo; destruction of the empire; its legacy to Europe. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 327 or HIST-D 427. (3 credit hours.)
      • Begins around 1900 with twilight of great empires (Russian, Prussian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian), exploring origins of modern eastern Europe, the "rebirth" of Eastern Europe after WWI; wild 1920s; polarizing ideological spectrum of the 1930s; and dynamics of communism and fascism. Given the spectre of WWII, this course will pose the question of whether and how we can read the interwar years in a way other than as a prelude to an inevitable catastrophe to come. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 328, HIST-D 329, or HIST-D 428. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines origins of communism in Eastern Europe, brutal takeover and Stalinization, attempts to reform communism, the fall of communism and ensuing battles for privatization, democratization, and the Wars in Yugoslavia. Looks at political institutions that shaped communist and post-communist Eastern Europe and important social and cultural developments. Credit given for only one of HIST-D 328, HIST-D 330, or HIST-D 428. (3 credit hours.)
      • Enrollment limited to freshmen and sophomores only. The development of European society from the downfall of Napoleon in 1815 to the present; the impact of the industrial revolution; the rise of the middle class; liberalism, Marxism, and mass politics; nationalism and imperialism; international communism and fascism. (3 credit hours.)
      • Evolution of American society: political, economic, social structure; racial and ethnic groups; sex roles; Indian, inter-American, and world diplomacy of the United States; evolution of ideology, war, territorial expansion, industrialization, urbanization, international events and their impact on American history. (3 credit hours.)
      • Evolution of American society: political, economic, social structure; racial and ethnic groups; sex roles; Indian, inter-American, and world diplomacy of the United States; evolution of ideology, war, territorial expansion, industrialization, urbanization, international events and their impact on American history. (3 credit hours.)
      • England from 1688 to present. Political and economic movements, such as liberalism and socialism, arising out of the industrialization of Britain. II Sem. (3 credit hours.)
      • From settlement of colonies to present. European background, colonial militia, Indian fighting. Principal foreign wars and their strategic objectives. Technological changes and effect of military on American society. Army is emphasized, with some attention to the Navy, Marines, and Air Force. (3 credit hours.)
      • The separate and shared lives of men and women in the family, which is examined not only as an instrument of socialization and affiliation but also as an economic and political institution. Each time the course is offered, it will focus on one region of the world. (3 credit hours.)
      • The history of medicine can best be understood in the context of the society of which it is a part. Stories of health and illness are placed within deeper historical contexts to enhance understanding of past societies. (3 credit hours.)
      • Jewish history from early modern times to the present. Topics include Jewish daily life in early modern Europe and Ottoman Turkey, Jewish mysticism, Hasidism, Jewish emancipation, modern Judaism, anti-Semitism, the Holocaust, Zionism, the State of Israel, and the history of American Jewry. Credit given for only one of HIST-H 252 or JSTU-J 252. (3 credit hours.)
      • American Jewry from its colonial beginnings to the present, emphasizing such topics as immigration; political, economic, religious, cultural, philanthropic, communal, and intellectual activities; anti-Semitism; and Zionism. Credit given for only one of HIST-H 259, JSTU-J 259, or REL-C 230. (3 credit hours.)
      • How have women's lives changed from the colonial period to the twentieth century? This introductory survey focuses on women's historical roles in the workplace, the family, and politics. Material will be drawn from legal, constitutional, political, social, demographic, economic, and religious history. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Post-1750 non-U.S./European or World History. One (1) course from the .
      • The shared experience of humankind from earliest times to the present. Topics include the Neolithic `evolution,' Eurasian and African cultural exchanges, the era of European reconnaissance, the development of the world-economy, `under-development,' and contemporary world inter-relationships. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural forces that have most profoundly affected the Middle East in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include the role of foreign rule in the region; the emergence of nationalism and modern nation-states; regional conflicts; Islamism; the evolution of ethnic, class, and gender identities. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • 1750 to present. Slave trade, European imperialism; impact of Islam and Christianity, new state formations, reassertion of African culture and identity. Credit given for only one of HIST-E 332 or HIST-E 432. (3 credit hours.)
      • Early populations and environment; spread of European settlement, interaction with African societies, and early race relations; Zulu power and white power; discovery of minerals and industrialization; urbanization and segregation; African and Afrikaner nationalisms; South Africa and its neighbors; Mandela and the new South Africa. Credit given for only one of HIST-E 333 or HIST-E 433. (3 credit hours.)
      • History of Senegambia, Mali, and Upper Guinea Coast. The Mali Empire, African "landlord" and European "stranger" relationships, slave and nonslave trade, spread of Islam, European conquest and colonial rule, and the integration of western Africa into the world economy. Credit given for only one of HIST-E 334 or HIST-E 434. (3 credit hours.)
      • Developments over the past two millennia in Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi, and northern Mozambique. Topics include the environment and peoples; the emergence of hierarchical societies; nineteenth-century economic and political changes; European imperialism; transformations in the colonial era; African independence. Credit given for only one of HIST-E 336 or HIST-E 436. (3 credit hours.)
      • African popular culture (music, sports, fashion) is the lens used to explore how Africans responded to and shaped life under colonial rule and after independence. We consider questions like: What is the relationship between popular culture and politics? How does popular culture change how we think about colonialism and independence? (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Studies social, economic, cultural, and political development from 1821-1990. Major topics include coffee and liberalism, the United States and Nicaragua, the era of reform, revolution, and counter-revolution. Credit given for only one of HIST-F 336 or HIST-F 436. (3 credit hours.)
      • Modern Argentina from Independence to the Contemporary era. Focuses on the historical development of the modern Argentine nation-state and the roots of its unique social, cultural, and political formations. The material used will be of an interdisciplinary nature ranging from novels and films to anthropological reports and political speeches. (3 credit hours.)
      • Explores key historical processes from first inhabitation through the present, including the social and economic repercussions of slavery; the impact of U.S. intervention on the islands; the effects of industrialization on Puerto Rican economy and policies; the Cuban Revolution and the transformation of Cuban society. (3 credit hours.)
      • Places contemporary Mexico in historical perspective, focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include nineteenth-century social and political movements; the causes and consequences of the 1910 revolution; the formation of Mexico's political system; problems of economic growth; and the changing patterns of gender, class, and ethnicity in Mexican society. Credit given for only one of HIST-F 346, HIST-F 446, or LTAM-L 400. (3 credit hours.)
      • Surveys the social, economic, political, and cultural factors that affect ordinary Latin Americans. Introduces themes ranging from the legacy of military regimes in the Southern Cone to social and political movements in Mexico, from the environmental disaster of the Brazilian rain forest to the impact of sports and television soap operas. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course presents, in broad scope, the relevance of developments in East Asia to the history of the physical world, human culture, and advanced civilizations, from the "big bang" to the present. Credit given for only one of EALC-E 101 or HIST-G 101. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Studies the historical background behind the big environmental challenges facing China today. Explores the values, ideas, institutions, and systems that underlie key historical phenomena, including climate change, water conservancy, public sanitation, resource depletion, and the shifting meanings of "nature" in Chinese culture and science. (3 credit hours.)
      • In-depth examination of the "making of modern South Asia" through this region's experience as an imperial territory of Great Britain. The focus of the course is upon social and cultural change, colonial governance, and forms of Indian nationalism. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian studies course related to Japan. Western impact and social and intellectual change in late Tokugawa Japan from about 1720. The Meiji Restoration. State capitalism and the Japanese development process. Empire, war, defeat, U.S. occupation, and renewal in the twentieth century, social and economic structures, religious systems, gender, science and art, and Japan's interaction with its East Asian neighbors. Credit given for only one of EALC-E 369 or HIST-G 369. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to Korea. Early Modern (1800-1910), Colonial (1910-1945), and Era of Division (1945-present) periods of Korean history, focusing on transformation of politics, economy, education, religion, and thought, as the nation falls under Japanese rule and subsequently splits into two states as a result of internal ideological division and the Cold War. Credit given for only one of EALC-E 342 or HIST-G 372. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to China. A survey of the final century of dynastic rule and the rise to power of the Nationalist and Communist parties, highlighting social and cultural developments, the impact of Western imperialism, and the evolution of revolutionary ideologies. Credit given for only one of HIST-G 385 or HIST-G 485. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: Previous history course in any field, or previous East Asian Studies course related to China. A survey of recent Chinese history focusing on social, cultural, and political life in the People's Republic of China and post-1949 Taiwan. Events covered include the Long March, the Cultural Revolution, and the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Credit given for only one of HIST-G 387 or HIST-G 487. (3 credit hours.)
      • Principal world developments in the twentieth century, stressing Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Europe; global and regional problems; political revolutions; social and cultural diversity. (3 credit hours.)
      • Enrollment limited to freshmen and education majors. Principal world developments in the twentieth century, stressing Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Europe; global and regional problems; political revolutions; social and cultural diversity. (3 credit hours.)
      • Contrasting patterns of indigenous change and response to Western imperialism in East Asia during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. China and Japan receive primary consideration; Korea and Vietnam, secondary. Emphasis on the rise of nationalism and other movements directed toward revolutionary change. (3 credit hours.)
      • Describes and analyzes the mutual interaction of the American countries and the major countries of East Asia—China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam—during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Emphasis on cultural interrelations and changing images. (3 credit hours.)
      • 1850-present. Cultural and national identities. Diplomacy, dictators, social progress. National cultures. Mexican revolution: Latin America in a world community. Revolution and counterrevolution. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the historical conditions in which sports have developed. Particular emphasis on sport in the ancient and medieval world; industrialization and sport; nationalism and sport; imperialism and sport; the state and sport; modern American society and sport. (3 credit hours.)
      • The central theme of this course is the role of "place" in history, focusing on Sydney and its surrounds. How was it viewed by the Europeans who first settled there, and by its original inhabitants—the Gadigal people? The course culminates in a trip to Sydney where students will be able to make connections between what they see in modern Sydney and what they have learned in class. (4 credit hours.)
      • Epidemic infectious disease in human history, explored in a wide variety of cultures and civilizations. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Global history of urban life from ancient Athens to twenty-first century Asian hypercities. Regular lectures by the instructor on changes in the urban world are supplemented by weekly presentations by faculty specialists on particular great cities at moments of social, cultural, and environmental crisis. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • Slavery and varieties of unfreedom have been common features in the histories of most world societies. This course explores the experiences of slavery in the Americas, Africa, South Asia and elsewhere and challenges students to think beyond the commonly understood plantation model of chattel slavery that marked the American experience. (3 credit hours.)
      • World War I claimed millions of lives and forever changed global political and economic landscapes. Europe's western front dominates our understandings of the war. Why then, is it called a "world war"? This course considers the war's global scope through different lenses, including military history, empire, gender, race, and environment. (3 credit hours.)
      • The sport of soccer is used to explore questions of race, gender, ethnicity, class, nationalism and empire; to understand how the "beautiful game" offers an alternative way to study themes such as religious animosities, dictatorship, decolonization and industrialization; and to illuminate the many intersections between the personal and the social, the local and the global. (3 credit hours.)
      • Explores the stories that people tell about the relations between humans and the natural world and the ways that natural disasters operate as both reality and idea. Considers issues drawn from world historical cases and how environmental history and catastrophes transcend political boundaries. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines how the social and cultural expectations of particular groups shape their behavior during wars. Case studies ranging from ancient Greece and China to current wars. Focus on cultural views of war and the human experiences of military personnel and civilians during wars. (3 credit hours.)
      • Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course will study the lives of the millions of peoples all over the world who participated in World War II as factory workers, propagandists, soldiers, mothers, political leaders, and survivors. Beginning with military strategy and diplomacy, we will focus on life on the home fronts of many nations. (3 credit hours.)
      • Considers exchange, commerce, and payment from the Ancient World to the contemporary context. Uses money as a way to compare various historical moments and history as a way of understanding money. Covers many of history's most important topics, including slavery, globalization, economic growth and decline. (3 credit hours.)
      • A historical examination of the causes, character and consequences of genocide from ancient times to the present, with a focus on the modern period. The course explores the concept of genocide as historical, legal and political category and compares it with other kinds and concepts of mass violence. (3 credit hours.)
  3. Capstone Sequence. Two (2) courses from the .
    • P: HIST-H 270. Normally limited to majors. Capstone course, generally taken in senior year. Students will discuss and analyze primary and/or secondary sources and undertake a substantial project demonstrating mastery of the historian's skills. Topics will vary. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: HIST-J 400. Generally taken in senior year. Requires research and presentation of a substantial historical project, such as a paper, exhibit, or oral history on a chosen topic. (3 credit hours.)
  4. Electives. Electives, as needed, to complete remaining requirements.
  5. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Arts requirements

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines. No more than 42 of these credit hours can come from the major.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 42 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.