Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Science in Animal Behavior (ABEHBS)Animal Behavior Program

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Bachelor of Science in Animal Behavior includes courses from the different disciplines that study animal behavior, providing the interdisciplinary foundations students need to reflect on the consequences of different intellectual approaches to a single problem. The B.S. in Animal Behavior is particularly valuable for students interested in careers in animal biology and behavior (e.g. research and teaching, wildlife management and conservation, veterinary medicine, animal training, zoo management, etc.).

Students have opportunities to conduct their own independent research or gain hands-on experience in animal behavior through the CISAB internship program and/or supervised laboratory research in which they apply their newly-learned knowledge to real-world contexts such as zoos, museums, and wildlife rescue centers.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 45 credit hours*, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Core Animal Behavior Courses.
    1. Introduction to Animal Behavior. One (1) course from the .
      • Provides students with a general introduction to the scientific study of animal behavior, including a broad overview of how developmental, physiological, and ecological factors determine behaviors and the evolutionary forces that shape those behaviors. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Workshop in Animal Behavior. One (1) course from the .
      • For students pursuing a major in animal behavior. Introduces a range of research topics within animal behavior. Provides information on general experimental methods and design, and on potential research opportunities in the field. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Advanced Workshop in Animal Behavior. One (1) course from the .
      • P: ABEH-A 200 and BIOL-Z 460. Research seminar for advanced animal behavior students. Focuses on an individual research project that culminates in a formal presentation related to the student's independent research or internship experience. Goal is to improve independent study, problem-solving, research, reading, writing, and oral presentation skills. Students also critically evaluate research in the primary literature and research presentations at the annual Animal Behavior Conference. (3 credit hours.)
    4. Animal Behavior. One (1) course from the .
      • P: Junior or senior standing. Introduction to the zoological study of animal behavior. Emphasizes both internal and external factors involved in the causation of species-typical behavior of animals (protozoa-primates) in their natural environment. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Perspectives in Animal Behavior.
    1. Evolutionary/Ecological Perspectives. Two (2) courses from the .
      • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Topics related to the scientific study of animal behavior not studied extensively in other courses. Topics vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • Major patterns of social organization in the order Primates, with focus on several important primate species. Examination of Darwinian theories of behavioral evolution. Particular attention paid to the influence of food-getting and diet on social behavior. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Chimp Behavior: The Legacy of Jane Goodall") Selected topics in bioanthropology. Analysis of research. Development of skills in analysis and criticism. Topic varies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: ANTH-A 105, ANTH-A 107, ANTH-B 200, or ANTH-B 301; or consent of instructor. Paleontology, functional morphology, behavior, and natural history of the infrahuman primates. Emphasis on behavioral and ecological correlates of morphology. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-L 111. Provides a strong framework and hands-on experience studying biodiversity. Course transitions between introductory materials considered in BIOL-L 111 and BIOL-L 112 and more advanced courses focused on specific groups of organisms (for example, vertebrate zoology). Includes field and lab components where local biodiversity is sampled and analyzed. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Provides a rigorous exploration of the theory of evolution—the conceptual core of biology. Topics include origins and history of life; the interplay of heredity and environment in shaping adaptations; molecular, behavioral, and social evolution; patterns of speciation, extinction, and their consequences; methods for inferring evolutionary relationships among organisms. Credit given for only one of the following: BIOL-L 318, BIOL-L 479, or BIOL-S 318. (3 credit hours.)
      • Not open to biology majors. Course will introduce students to biological processes underlying male-female differences in anatomy, physiology, and behavior. Discussions of sexual differentiation in organisms ranging from yeast to humans will be included. Functional (evolutionary/ecological) and mechanistic (developmental/physiological) explanations for sex differences will be addressed. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Junior or senior standing. Not open to biology majors. Basic concepts and principles of evolution, heredity, and individual development. Problems of the individual and society raised by present and future genetic knowledge and technology. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. Explores a variety of topics related to the evolution of nervous systems, with a focus on vertebrate brains. Topics include comparative neuroanatomy, methods, approaches to homology, the meaning of changes in size, ecological and behavioral specializations, developmental constraints, and a consideration of how special (or not) human brains are. A basic background in neuroscience is recommended but not required. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Consent of instructor. Sensory systems are the gateways to all information that animals have about their environment. They are under intense natural and sexual selection and can drive evolutionary divergence. This course focuses on these issues and how sensory systems transduce and extract environmental information. Includes visits from guest speakers in the field. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-L 111. R: BIOL-L 318. Major concepts of ecology for science majors; relation of individual organisms to their environment, population ecology, structure and function of ecosystems. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 473 and BIOL-L 479. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-L 111 or equivalent; BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. Provides a rigorous exploration of the theory of evolution—the conceptual core of biology. Topics include origins and history of life; the interplay of heredity and environment in shaping adaptations; molecular, behavioral, and social evolution; patterns of speciation, extinction, and their consequences; methods for inferring evolutionary relationships among organisms. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 318, BIOL-L 479, or BIOL-S 318. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-L 111. Ecology, evolution, and phylogeny of major invertebrate groups, with emphasis on current controversies and concepts. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-L 111; and junior or senior standing. Introduces diversity of extant fishes with respect to evolutionary relationships, classification, structure, function, behavior, ecology and biogeography. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: One course from the General Education Natural and Mathematical Sciences course list or one course from the General Education Social and Historical Studies course list. Evolutionary history of reef ecosystems through geologic time inclusive of reef composition and global distribution, modern reef development, conservation and management practices, and the persistence of the reef ecosystem through climate change scenarios. Covers biologic, ecologic, and geologic principles as they pertain to coral reef ecosystems. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 341 or GEOL-G 341. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Minimum 3.000 GPA and at least one course in geology, anthropology, physical geography, or related field of study. Interdisciplinary field course in geo-paleoanthropology in the Olduvai Gorge. Develops skills in the application of innovative theory and techniques in human evolutionary research. Promotes understanding of evolutionary processes, such as tectonics and climate episodes, and how these processes influence the development of savanna environments in the East African Rift Valley. Credit given for only one of EAS-X 377, GEOL-G 349, or GEOL-X 377. (6 credit hours.)
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
    2. Mechanisms of Behavior Perspectives. Two (2) courses from the .
      • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Topics related to the scientific study of animal behavior not studied extensively in other courses. Topics vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • P: ANTH-B 200; or consent of instructor. Reviews the roles of hormones in the evolution and expression of human and nonhuman animal behaviors. Emphasis placed on behaviors associated with aggression, stress, mating, and parenting. Particularly relevant for students interested in evolutionary psychology and human health. (3 credit hours.)
      • Not open to biology majors. Course will introduce students to biological processes underlying male-female differences in anatomy, physiology, and behavior. Discussions of sexual differentiation in organisms ranging from yeast to humans will be included. Functional (evolutionary/ecological) and mechanistic (developmental/physiological) explanations for sex differences will be addressed. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. Explores a variety of topics related to the evolution of nervous systems, with a focus on vertebrate brains. Topics include comparative neuroanatomy, methods, approaches to homology, the meaning of changes in size, ecological and behavioral specializations, developmental constraints, and a consideration of how special (or not) human brains are. A basic background in neuroscience is recommended but not required. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112; and junior or senior standing. R: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Addresses the intersection of two disciplines: animal behavior and neurobiology. Uses integrative and comparative approaches to understand how the nervous system controls animal behavior in natural contexts and how neural circuits evolve to generate diversity in behavior. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. R: CHEM-C 341. Mechanisms of hormone action from the molecular to the organismal level in vertebrates. (3 credit hours.)
      • One of the following:
        • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155; and one of the following: BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 111, BIOL-L 112, BIOL-A 215, or BIOL-P 215. An examination of the cellular bases of behavior, emphasizing contemporary views and approaches to the study of the nervous system. Neural structure, function, and organization are considered in relation to sensory and motor function, motivation, learning, and other basic behaviors. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. R: 3 credits of Biology such as BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 111, BIOL-L 112, BIOL-A 215, or BIOL-P 215. A survey of contemporary neuroscience, examining the neural basis of behavior with approaches including molecular, cellular, developmental, cognitive, and behavioral neuroscience. Sensory and motor function, learning and memory, and other behaviors are considered using anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, and genetic approaches, providing a balanced view of neuroscience. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Introduction to the major psychoactive drugs and how they act upon the brain to influence behavior. Discussion of the role of drugs as therapeutic agents for various clinical disorders and as probes to provide insight into brain function. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Detailed description of the neural systems responsible for vision, touch, hearing, taste, smell, and balance. Similarities and differences in the strategies employed by these systems will be stressed. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Examination of the interaction of the developing brain with the behavior it mediates. Cellular systems and organismal levels of analysis will all be considered in the organization of structure function relationships in the neural basis of behavior. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Comprehensive survey of theories and data concerned with neural correlates of associative and non-associative forms of learning and memory. Vertebrate and invertebrate model systems and preparations as well as data obtained from the human neuropsychology literature will be studied. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346 with a grade of B or higher. R: A biology course at the 300–400 level. Recent and historical literature in the field of reproductive neuroscience. Includes information about sexual differentiation of the brain during development and puberty, sexual differentiation of the neurophysiology of the reproductive tract, decision making in sexual context, and human studies of sexuality. Develops skills to critically evaluate basic scientific literature and develop presentations. (3 credit hours.)
      • Prerequisites vary according to the topics offered and are specified in the Schedule of Classes each term. Studies in special topics not ordinarily covered in other departmental courses. Topics vary with instructor and semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. This seminar examines the neurobiology of stress effects on cognition, psychopathology, and health, from the cellular to the systems level. Through readings from primary literature, discussions, and lectures, students will develop a base of knowledge and think critically about the neural and behavioral effects of stress. (3 credit hours.)
      • No description is available for this course.
    3. Environmental/Developmental/Cognitive Perspectives. Two (2) courses from the .
      • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Topics related to the scientific study of animal behavior not studied extensively in other courses. Topics vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to the natural history of humans (Homo sapiens). Includes coverage of evolutionary theory and its relevance for understanding contemporary human biology, genetics and inheritance, description and analysis of human biological variation and adaptation, human-environment biocultural interactions, similarities and differences between humans and non-human primates, and the fossil record for primate and human evolution. (4 credit hours.)
      • Intermediate survey of theories and problems in social and cultural anthropology. Historical development, methods of inquiry, focal problems, and contemporary theoretical perspectives. (3 credit hours.)
      • An introduction to the study of language and its relations to the rest of culture. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-S 311. Analysis of the developmental processes that lead to the construction of whole organisms from single stem cells. Covers the molecular and genetic analysis of mutations and pathways that disrupt these processes and cause disease. Other topics include adult stem cells and their role in tissue regeneration. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 317 or BIOL-L 417. (3 credit hours.)
      • Foundational introduction to the cognitive and information sciences. The primary themes are: (1) causal issues such as functional and computational architecture (e.g., modularity, effectiveness, and implementation, analog/digital), neuroscience, and embodied dynamics; and (2) semantic issues such as meaning, representation, content, and information flow. The role of both themes in logic, perception, computation, cognition, and consciousness. Throughout, an emphasis on writing, analysis, and exposition. (4 credit hours.)
      • R: PSY-P 101. An introduction to the neural mechanisms underlying complex cognition, and a survey of topics in neuroscience related to cognition. The course provides a solid background in human biopsychology. If COGS-Q 301 is not offered in a given year, PSY-P 423 Human Neuropsychology may be substituted for this course. (3 credit hours.)
      • A comparative overview surveying basic aspects of animal communication, including human communication, and covering such issues as the nature of communicative signals, the relative unity versus diversity within communicating groups, and the role of learning versus innateness in communication systems. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: 3 credit hours of philosophy or coursework in cognitive science or brain and psychological science. Selected topics from among the following: the nature of mental phenomena (e.g., thinking, volition, perception, emotion); the mind-body problem (e.g., dualism, behaviorism, functionalism); connections to cognitive science issues in psychology, linguistics, and artificial intelligence; computational theories of mind. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; or PSY-P 155. Facts and principles of animal and human learning, especially as treated in theories attempting to provide frameworks for understanding what learning is and how it takes place. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; or PSY-P 155. R: PSY-P 211. How needs, desires, and incentives influence behavior; research on motivational processes in human and animal behavior, including ways in which motives change and develop. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. R: MATH-M 026, MATH-M 119, or introductory physics. Basic data, theories, psychophysics, illusions, and other topics fundamental to understanding sensory and perceptual processes. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Roboticists know that actions like catching a fly ball are exceedingly complex, yet people perform them effortlessly. How perceptual information is generated by and used in guiding such actions is covered, as are issues of motor coordination and control. Classes include laboratories on analysis of optic flow and limb movements. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 330 or PSY-P 330. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Introduction to human cognitive processes, including attention and perception, memory, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Examination of the interaction of the developing brain with the behavior it mediates. Cellular systems and organismal levels of analysis will all be considered in the organization of structure function relationships in the neural basis of behavior. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Comprehensive survey of theories and data concerned with neural correlates of associative and non-associative forms of learning and memory. Vertebrate and invertebrate model systems and preparations as well as data obtained from the human neuropsychology literature will be studied. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 325 or PSY-P 417. Advanced treatment of history, basic concepts, theories, and experimental literature examining the relation of learning and evolution. Compares ethological, comparative, and general process approaches. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PSY-P 315 or PSY-P 316 . R: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346. Survey of phylogenetic and ontogenetic principles from a comparative perspective. Focuses on a broad biological approach to organic and social development. (3 credit hours.)
    4. Electives. An additional two courses from this list or from required laboratory or supervised research courses below. Additional animal behavior-related courses can be applied to this requirement with consent of the program.
  3. Formal Laboratory. Two (2) courses from the .
    • Teaches how to observe, quantify, and manipulate animal behavior in a laboratory setting. Practices fundamental experimental techniques used in ethological research. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: ANTH-B 200; or consent of instructor. Laboratory investigations of human skeletal biology, including age and sex determinations, bone pathologies, and forensic identification; human paleontological and primate observations; variability in living populations, including anthropometry, blood grouping, and dermatoglyphics. Emphasis on a biocultural perspective in applying methods and techniques of bioanthropology. (3 credit hours.)
    • Lecture and laboratory introduction to the preparation, collection, identification, and interpretation of faunal specimens from archaeological sites. Also includes an introduction to forensic identifications and to zooarchaeological literature. (5 credit hours.)
    • One of the following:
      • P: BIOL-H 111. Continuation of BIOL-H 111. Intensive seminar/laboratory experience exploring the interdisciplinary nature of the modern life sciences. The course will revolve around a central question chosen by the students and will analyze how life scientists from biochemistry, cellular/molecular biology, and neuroscience might contribute to the common understanding of a fundamental problem. Credit given for only one of BIOL-H 112 or BIOL-L 113. (4 credit hours.)
      • P or C: BIOL-L 112. R: BIOL-L 111. Laboratory experiments in various aspects of biology, with a focus on investigative logic and methods. Introduces aspects of cell biology, genetics, and evolutionary biology. Should not be taken during first semester of residence unless credit has been earned for both BIOL-E 111 and BIOL-E 112. Credit given for only one of BIOL-H 112 or BIOL-L 113. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111. Provides a strong framework and hands-on experience studying biodiversity. Course transitions between introductory materials considered in BIOL-L 111 and BIOL-L 112 and more advanced courses focused on specific groups of organisms (for example, vertebrate zoology). Includes field and lab components where local biodiversity is sampled and analyzed. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111; and BIOL-H 111 or BIOL-L 112. Intended for biology majors. Avian systematics, distribution, evolution, ecology, and behavior, emphasis on migration and orientation, territoriality, communication, and reproductive behavior. Field trips will concentrate on identification, interpretation of behavior, and research methods. (4 credit hours.)
    • Field course taught in a tropical area overseas. Topics center on ecology and evolution and may include plants and animals, their interactions in rain forests, seasonally dry forests and mangroves, cloud forests, marine biology, marine/land interface, coral physiology, and reef development. Requires detailed field journal and other projects on areas visited. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 473 or equivalent; and consent of instructor. Lectures and two to three weeks of fieldwork on various problems of ecosystem structure and dynamics. Quantitative comparisons will be made of ecosystems in several different environments. May be repeated once for credit. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111 . R: Previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL-L 473. Introduction to research problems and techniques in the ecology of individuals, populations, and ecosystems. (2–3 credit hours.)
    • Intended for the junior or senior science major. Course in human physiology designed to introduce the senior undergraduate student to the function of the human body in health, disease, and extreme environments. Emphasizes how the different organ systems work to maintain homeostasis and how organ function is integrated. The content and key concepts are presented in order to provide students insight into the scientific process through problem-solving and exploration of resources. Utilizes experimental inquiry, case-based and problem-oriented methodology with students working in teams, and an emphasis on clinical application. The laboratory component is incorporated into the structure of the course. (4 credit hours.)
    • P: One introductory biology course. Insects, with emphasis on evolution, distribution, behavior, and structure. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: One introductory biology course. Laboratory and field studies of invertebrates, with an emphasis on experiments with living specimens. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 111 and junior or senior standing. Morphology, evolution, adaptations, and general biology of vertebrates. (5 credit hours.)
    • P: BIOL-L 211 or BIOL-S 211. R: BIOL-L 312 and BIOL-Z 466. Survey of various endocrine systems using molecular, cellular, and whole organism methodologies. Emphasis on structure, function, and regulation of endocrine glands and cells, and their roles in maintaining homeostasis within the organism. (2 credit hours.)
    • P: Minimum 3.000 GPA and at least one course in geology, anthropology, physical geography, or related field of study. Interdisciplinary field course in geo-paleoanthropology in the Olduvai Gorge. Develops skills in the application of innovative theory and techniques in human evolutionary research. Promotes understanding of evolutionary processes, such as tectonics and climate episodes, and how these processes influence the development of savanna environments in the East African Rift Valley. Credit given for only one of EAS-X 377, GEOL-G 349, or GEOL-X 377. (6 credit hours.)
    • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346; and PSY-K 300 or equivalent. Experiments with and demonstrations of contemporary approaches in behavioral neuroscience. (3 credit hours.)
    • No description is available for this course.
    • No description is available for this course.
  4. Supervised Research or Internship. Choose one (1) additional Formal Laboratory course from the list above, or choose three (3) credit hours of internship in animal behavior, or a three (3) credit hour laboratory affiliated with CISAB, the Center for the Integrated Study of Animal Behavior, from the .
    • Animal Behavior Internship
    • P: Consent of department. Hands-on animal behavior research experience in practical situations. Interns are matched with faculty mentors and internship sites. Students combine research with practical service to the host organization. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in ABEH-A 495 and ABEH-X 473. S/F grading. (1–6 credit hours.)
    • Supervised Research
    • P: ANTH-A 403, ANTH-A 405, or consent of instructor. Independent work of student's choice in one aspect of the field of museum work. Relevant readings required. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours in ANTH-X 476. (1–8 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of instructor. Fieldwork in anthropology carried out by the student in consultation with faculty members. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours in ANTH-X 477. (1–8 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of chairperson. Supervised work of an anthropological nature arranged through an outside agency or institution, such as an internship, apprenticeship, or volunteer work at a governmental office, zoo, or archaeological site. One credit hour per 45 hours or one full-time week of activity. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours in ANTH-A 496 and ANTH-X 478. (1–8 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of instructor. Fieldwork involving the collection and analysis of biological or biosocial data on prehistoric and contemporary human populations. The materials or data may be paleontological, archaeological, physiological, or ecological in nature. 1 credit hour per full week of fieldwork. Credit given for only one of ANTH-B 405 or ANTH-X 479. (1–8 credit hours.)
    • P: Overall GPA 2.500 or above; and written consent of faculty member supervising research. Must present oral report to complete more than 6 credit hours. Must complete a written assignment as evidence of each semester's work. Section authorization. Maximum of 6 credits allowed for summer research. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours in BIOL-L 490 and BIOL-X 490. (1–12 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of research director and department. For outstanding students. Cannot be substituted for any chemistry course. May not be used to satisfy upper-level laboratory hour requirement in a B.S. major; may not be used in fulfillment of chemistry major hours in a B.A. major. CHEM-X 399 and CHEM-X 499 may not be taken concurrently during the same semester. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours in CHEM-C 409 and CHEM-X 399. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of instructor. Active participation in research under faculty supervision. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of instructor. Students will conduct a research project in the cognitive and information sciences by designing, conducting, and analyzing an independent experiment; by developing and testing a computer simulation of some aspect of cognition; or by otherwise engaging in a program of original research. Projects must be approved in advance and supervised by the instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • P: An Honors Committee approved by the Cognitive Science Program. Methods of research in cognitive science are analyzed. Students present their projects for discussion and analysis. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of instructor or supervisor. Research participation in group or independent project under the supervision of a faculty member in departmental research areas; or topic agreed upon between the student and supervisor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in PHYS-S 406 and PHYS-X 498. (1–6 credit hours.)
    • P: Approval of departmental honors committee. May be substituted for advanced laboratory requirement or, given the permission of the departmental honors committee, for certain other requirements in the program for majors.. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (1–12 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of department. An approved research agreement must be in place. Does not count toward capstone or neuroscience lab credit. First in a series of supervised research courses that require active participation in research in a single lab. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–6 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of department. An approved research agreement must be in place.. Second in a series of supervised research courses that require active participation in research in a single lab. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (1–6 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of department. An approved research agreement must be in place. Third in a series of supervised research courses that require active participation in research in a single lab. Does not count toward capstone or neuroscience lab credit. An independent experiment of modest magnitude. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in PSY-P 493 and PSY-X 497. (1–6 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of department. R: PSY-X 397 or PSY-X 398. An approved research agreement must be in place. Counts toward capstone credit or neuroscience lab credit in approved labs. The capstone experience in a series of supervised research courses that require active participation in research in a single lab. Course requires a research plan and progress reports. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in PSY-P 494 and PSY-X 498. (2–3 credit hours.)
  5. Addenda Requirements**.
    1. Introductory Science.
      1. Foundations of Biology: Diversity, Evolution, and Ecology. One (1) course from the .
        • Credit by examination for demonstrating an understanding of basic facts and concepts of the lecture content of BIOL-L 111. Credit given for only one of BIOL-E 111 or BIOL-L 111. (3 credit hours.)
        • For biology and other science majors. Preference will be given to freshmen and sophomores. Focus is on the processes of evolution leading to organismal diversity and adaptation, as well as basic ecological concepts. Credit not given for both BIOL-E 111 and BIOL-L 111. (4 credit hours.)
      2. Foundations of Biology: Biological Mechanisms. One (1) course from the .
        • Credit by examination for demonstrating an understanding of basic facts and concepts of the lecture content of BIOL-L 112. Credit given for only one of the following: BIOL-E 112, BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 112, or BIOL-Q 201. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: Permission of IFLE Director/Biology Department. Intensive seminar/laboratory experience exploring the interdisciplinary nature of the modern life sciences. The course will revolve around a central question chosen by the students and will analyze how life scientists from biochemistry, cellular/molecular biology, and neuroscience might contribute to the common understanding of a fundamental problem. Credit given for only one of BIOL-E 112, BIOL-H 111, BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 112, or BIOL-Q 201. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: High school or college chemistry. For biology and other science majors. Integrated picture of manner in which organisms at diverse levels of organization meet problems in maintaining and propagating life. Credit given for only one of BIOL-E 112, BIOL-H 111, BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 112, BIOL-Q 201. (4 credit hours.)
      3. Introductory Psychology. One (1) course from the .
        • Introduction to psychology; its methods, data, and theoretical interpretations in areas of learning, sensory psychology, and psychophysiology. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 101, PSY-P 106, PSY-P 151, or PSY-P 155. Equivalent to IUPUI PSY-B 105 and PSY-P 151. (3 credit hours.)
        • An introduction to psychological and brain sciences for psychology majors. Introduces students to the history of psychology and its place in science, to the experimental method, and to the broad range of topics studied by psychological scientists. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 101, PSY-P 106, PSY-P 151, or PSY-P 155. (3 credit hours.)
      4. Introductory Science Elective. One (1) course from the .
        • Both of the following:
          • Essential principles of chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, properties and reactions of elements and compounds, stoichiometry, solutions, and acids and bases. For students who are not planning careers in the sciences and for those with no previous coursework in chemistry. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 101 or CHEM-C 103. (3 credit hours.)
          • P or C: CHEM-C 101. Introduction to the techniques and reasoning of experimental chemistry. Emphasis is given to study of physical and chemical properties of inorganic compounds. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 101 and CHEM-C 121; or CHEM-C 103. (2 credit hours.)
        • Both of the following:
          • P: CHEM-C 101, CHEM-C 121; or CHEM-C 103; or chemistry and math placement examinations and consent of the department. Lecture course covering basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry, basic mathematical and conceptual principles in atomic structure and periodic properties, molecular structure, chemical bonding, energy (thermochemistry), kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics. Credit given for only one of the following: CHEM-C 105, CHEM-C 117, or CHEM-S 117. (3 credit hours.)
          • P or C: CHEM-C 117. Basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry that align with the topics in CHEM-C 117. Chemical bonding (atomic structure, molecular structure, molecular orbital theory, and non-covalent interactions), macroscopic properties (energy, kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics). Hands-on laboratory techniques in chemistry necessary for success in later chemistry laboratory courses, especially organic chemistry. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 125 or CHEM-C 127. (2 credit hours.)
        • Designed specifically to alleviate deficiencies in chemistry and prepare students for CHEM-C 117-CHEM-C 127. Content includes applications of measurement and chemical formula/equation conversions; modern view of the atom; and solution processes that relate to chemical reactions. Lectures, labs, and discussion sections will emphasize problem-solving strategies. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 103; or CHEM-C 101 and CHEM-C 121. (5 credit hours.)
        • P: Chemistry and math placement examinations and consent of department. For honors students only. For students with unusual aptitude or preparation. An integrated lecture-laboratory course covering basic principles of chemistry and biochemistry. Credit given for only one of CHEM-C 105 and CHEM-C 125; CHEM-C 117 and CHEM-C 127; or CHEM-S 117. (5 credit hours.)
        • Earth's history interpreted through 4.5 billion years. Deductive approach to understanding the significance of rocks and fossils and reconstructing the plate-tectonic origin of mountains, continents, and ocean basins. A survey of events in earth's evolution relevant to contemporary environmental concerns. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 104 or GEOL-G 104. (3 credit hours.)
        • Introduction to planet Earth as a dynamic and complex global system. Course materials will demonstrate physical and chemical linkages between biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere that directly impact lifestyles of human populations at time scales of years to centuries. Lecture and lab. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 105 or GEOL-G 105. (3 credit hours.)
        • Origin and evolution of vertebrates including dinosaurs and their distant relatives such as fish, amphibians, birds, and mammals. Course will focus on dinosaur evolution, paleobiology, paleoecology, and extinction. The scientific method and quantitative and qualitative methodologies will be presented. Two lectures and one demonstration each week. Credit given for only one of EAS-E 114 or GEOL-G 114. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: MATH-M 211 or MATH-S 211; or consent of the department. Techniques of integration (by parts, trigonometric substitutions, partial fractions), improper integrals, volume, work, arc length, surface area, infinite series. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 120 or MATH-M 212. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: MATH-S 211 or consent of department. Includes material of MATH-M 212 and supplemental topics. Designed for students of outstanding ability in mathematics. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212. (4 credit hours.)
        • Physical principles involved in the description, generation, and reproduction of sound. Topics include physics of vibrations and waves, propagation, Fourier decomposition of complex wave forms, harmonic spectra, standing waves and resonance, sound loudness and decibels, room acoustics, analog/digital recording/ reproduction. For interested students, PHYS-P 109 is an optional companion laboratory course. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: MATH-M 026 or high school equivalent. Newtonian mechanics, wave motion, heat, and thermodynamics. Application of physical principles to related scientific disciplines, especially life sciences. Intended for students preparing for careers in the life sciences and the health professions. Three lectures, one discussion section, and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Credit given for only one of PHYS-H 221, PHYS-P 201, or PHYS-P 221. (5 credit hours.)
        • No description is available for this course.
        • P: High school precalculus math. A first course in computer science for those intending to take advanced computer science courses. Introduction to programming and to algorithm design and analysis. Using the Scheme programming language, the course covers several programming paradigms. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, CSCI-H 211, or CSCI-A 591. (4 credit hours.)
    2. Statistics. One (1) course from the .
      • P: ECON-E 201 and MATH-M 118 or similar course emphasizing probability concepts. R: ECON-E 202 and MATH-M 119. Lectures emphasize the use of basic probability concepts and statistical theory in the estimation and testing of single parameter and multivariate relationships. In computer labs, using Microsoft Excel, each student calculates descriptive statistics, probabilities, and least squares regression coefficients in situations based on current business and economic events. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370; ANTH-A 306; CJUS-K 300; MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310; POLS-Y 395; PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310; SOC-S 371; STAT-K 310 or STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303; or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Admission to the LAMP honors certificate program. A discussion course emphasizing the use of quantitative methods and analytical skills in exploring and solving business-related problems. Topics vary with the instructor and year and include mathematical modeling and operations research, organizational control, and corporate finance. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: One of MATH-M 106, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-M 212, MATH-V 118, or, MATH-V 119. Introduction to statistics; nature of statistical data; ordering and manipulation of data; measures of central tendency and dispersion; elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: One of MATH-M 106, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-M 212, MATH-V 118, or, MATH-V 119. Introduction to probability and statistics; elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Covers concepts of statistical inference and decision; estimation and hypothesis testing; Bayesian inference; and statistical decision theory. Special topics include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 014 or equivalent. R: 3 credit hour mathematics course approved for College of Arts and Sciences mathematics requirement. Introduces the logic of statistical inference. Students will learn how to use sample data to reach conclusions about a population of interest by calculating confidence intervals and significance tests. Estimating the effects of multiple independent variables using cross-tabulations and/or regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, STAT-K 310 or STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301, SOC-S 371, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 014 or equivalent. Lecture and laboratory. Introduction to methods for analyzing quantitative data. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models of data, inference about populations from random samples. Regression and analysis of variance. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 014. Introduction to methods for analyzing data arising in the life sciences, designed for biology, human biology, and pre-medical students. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models, fundamental principles of estimation and hypothesis testing, inferences about means, correlation, linear regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 212, MATH-M 301, or MATH-M 303. Basic concepts of data analysis and statistical inference, applied to 1-sample and 2-sample location problems, the analysis of variance, and linear regression. Probability models and statistical methods applied to practical situations using actual data sets from various disciplines. Credit given for only one of STAT-S 320 or STAT-S 350. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-M 119 or equivalent. Introduction to probability and statistics. Elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation, hypothesis testing, Bayesian inference, statistical decision theory. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
      • No description is available for this course.
    3. Ethics. One (1) course from the .
      • Investigation of ethical issues that arise in the biological and medical sciences, the impact of these issues on the behavior of scientists during the conduct of scientific research, and on the role of science in discussions about ethics and public policy. Introduction to major ethical theories and critical reasoning in biological and medical ethics. (3 credit hours.)
      • Philosophers’ answers to ethical problems (e.g., the nature of good and evil, the relation of duty to self-interest, the objectivity of moral judgments), and the applications of ethical theory to contemporary problems. (3 credit hours.)
      • Application of moral theory to a variety of personal, social, and political contexts, such as world hunger, nuclear weapons, social justice, life-and-death decisions, and problems in medical ethics. (3 credit hours.)
      • A philosophical consideration of ethical problems that arise in current biomedical practice, e.g., with regard to abortion, euthanasia, determination of death, consent to treatment, and professional responsibilities in connection with research, experimentation, and health care delivery. (3 credit hours.)
      • Western religious convictions and their consequences for judgments about personal and social morality, including such issues as sexual morality, medical ethics, questions of socioeconomic organization, and moral judgments about warfare. (3 credit hours.)
  6. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Notes

  • * A single course may be counted in only one area.
  • ** Courses used to fulfill addenda requirements require a grade of C- or higher and do not count toward the Major GPA or Major Hours.

Bachelor of Science requirements

The Bachelor of Science degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 36 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 2 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 2 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: Not required
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: Not required
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the first semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.