Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Science in Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASTPHYSBS)Department of Astronomy

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Bachelor of Science in Astronomy and Astrophysics provides an in-depth study of the field, and prepares students for graduate study and a subsequent career in astronomy and astrophysics, but also for careers in related technical fields including conducting research at universities or national facilities such as NASA centers (e.g. the Goddard Space Flight Center near Washington, DC) and national and private observatories (e.g. the National Optical Astronomy Observatory in Tucson, Arizona or the Carnegie Observatory in Pasadena, California, or the National Radio Astronomy Observatory), teaching at the college or high school level, working at planetariums and science museums, computer-support positions for NASA contractors, scientific writing, positions in the aerospace, defense, surveillance, and environmental fields, and military work.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 30 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Mathematics Core.
    1. Calculus I. One (1) course from the .
      • R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus, and trigonometry as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 027. Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications. A student may receive credit for only one of the following: MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: Hutton Honors College membership or consent of department. R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus and trigonometry as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 027. Designed for students of outstanding ability, who are considering further study in mathematics. Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications, with emphasis placed on theory. Credit given for only one of MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-S 211, or MATH-V 119. (4 credit hours.)
    2. Calculus II. One (1) course from the .
      • P: MATH-M 211 or MATH-S 211; or consent of department. Techniques of integration (by parts, trigonometric substitutions, partial fractions), improper integrals, volume, work, arc length, surface area, infinite series. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 120 or MATH-M 212. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-S 211 or consent of department. Includes material of MATH-M 212 and supplemental topics. Designed for students of outstanding ability in mathematics. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212. (4 credit hours.)
    3. Calculus III. One (1) course from the .
      • P: MATH-M 212, MATH-M 213, or MATH-S 212. Elementary geometry of 2, 3, and n-space; functions of several variables; partial differentiation; minimum and maximum problems; multiple integration. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-S 212 or consent of instructor; and MATH M-301, MATH M-303, or MATH S-303. Honors version of MATH-M 311, covering geometry of 2, 3, and n-space; functions of several variables; partial differentiation; minimum and maximum problems; and multiple integration. For students with unusual aptitude and motivation. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 311 or MATH-S 311. (4 credit hours.)
    4. Introduction to Differential Equations with Applications I. One (1) course from the .
      • P: MATH-M 212, MATH-M 213, or MATH-S 212. R: MATH-M 301, MATH-M 303, or MATH-S 303. Ordinary differential equations and methods for their solution, including series methods and the Laplace transform. Applications of differential equations. s, stability, and numerical methods. Partial differential equations of mathematical physics, Fourier series. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 343 or MATH-S 343. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-S 212 or consent of instructor. Introduction, with historical examples, first order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and applications, second order linear ODEs, linear ODEs of higher order, series solutions to linear ODEs, and numerical methods for ODEs. In addition, some theoretical aspects will be studied in detail such as the Picard existence/uniqueness theorem for initial-value problems, convergence of series solutions, and the matrix exponential exp(tA). (3 credit hours.)
  2. Physics Core.
    1. Physics I. One (1) course from the .
      • P: Consent of department. P or C: MATH-M 211 or equivalent. First semester of a calculus-based sequence in introductory physics, intended primarily for highly motivated and well prepared students. Covers the material of P221 and supplementary topics. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of PHYS-H 221, PHYS-P 201, or PHYS-P 221. (5 credit hours.)
      • C: MATH-M 211 or consent of instructor. First semester of a three-semester, calculus-based sequence intended for science majors. Three lectures, two discussion sections, and one 2-hour lab each week. Physics majors are encouraged to take PHYS-P 221 in the fall semester of the freshman year. Newtonian mechanics, oscillations and waves, heat and thermodynamics. Credit given for only one of PHYS-H 221, PHYS-P 201, or PHYS-P 221. (5 credit hours.)
    2. Physics II. One (1) course from the .
      • P: PHYS-H 221; or PHYS-P 221 and consent of department. Second semester of a calculus-based sequence in introductory physics, intended primarily for highly motivated and well prepared students. Covers the material of PHYS-P 222 and supplementary topics. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of PHYS-H 222, PHYS-P 202, or PHYS-P 222. (5 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-H 221 or PHYS-P 221; or PHYS-P 201 and consent of instructor. C: MATH-M 212 or consent of instructor. Second semester of a three-semester, calculus-based sequence intended for science majors.Three lectures, two discussion sections, and one 2-hour lab each week. Physics majors are encouraged to take PHYS-P 222 in the spring semester of the freshman year. Primarily electricity, magnetism, and geometrical and physical optics. Credit given for only one of PHYS-H 222, PHYS-P 202, or PHYS-P 222. (5 credit hours.)
    3. Physics III. One (1) course from the .
      • P: PHYS-H 222 or PHYS-P 222; or PHYS-P 202 and consent of instructor. Third semester of a three-semester, calculus-based sequence.Intended for science and mathematics majors. Three lecture-discussion periods each week. Special theory of relativity; introduction to quantum physics; atomic, nuclear, condensed matter, and elementary particle physics. (3 credit hours.)
    4. Theory of Electricity and Magnetism I. One (1) course from the .
      • P: PHYS-H 222 or PHYS-P 222; or PHYS-P 202 and consent of instructor; and MATH-M 312 or PHYS-P 321. Electrostatic fields and differential operators, Laplace and Poisson equations, dielectric materials, steady currents, power and energy, induction, magnetic fields, scalar and vector potentials, Maxwell's equations. (3 credit hours.)
    5. Theory of Electricity and Magnetism II. One (1) course from the .
      • P: PHYS-P 331; or consent of instructor. Magnetic materials, wave equations and radiation, energy transfer and conversion. Pointing vector and momentum, retarded potentials, dipole radiation, transmission lines and wave guides, relativity. (3 credit hours.)
    6. Electives. Two (2) courses from the .
      • P: PHYS-P 222 or PHYS-H 222; or PHYS-P 202 and consent of instructor. P or C: MATH-M 343. Elementary mechanics of particles and rigid bodies, treated by methods of calculus and differential equations. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-P 441; or consent of instructor. C: MATH-M 343. Elementary mechanics of particles and rigid bodies, treated by methods of calculus and differential equations. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-P 301 and PHYS-P 331. R: PHYS-P 332 concurrently. The Schroedinger equation with applications to problems such as barrier transmission, harmonic oscillation, and the hydrogen atom. Discussion of orbital and spin angular momentum and identical particles. Introduction to perturbation theory. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: PHYS-P 453. Structure of multielectron atoms. Experimental facts and theoretical models in solid state physics, nuclear physics, and elementary particle physics. (4 credit hours.)
  3. Astronomy Core.
    1. General Astronomy I. One (1) course from the .
      • R: Mastery of high school algebra and trigonometry; or MATH-M 025 and MATH-M 026. For physical science majors. Introduction to modern astronomy and astrophysics, including basic principles of mechanics, gravity, optics, radiation, and observational and experimental methods. A main theme is to explore how these principles affect the evolution of our scientific understanding of astronomical phenomena. Topics typically include the night sky, planetary bodies, the Sun and our solar system, and stars in our Milky Way galaxy. Credit given for only one of AST-A 201 or AST-A 221. (4 credit hours.)
    2. General Astronomy II. See the .
      • R: Mastery of high school algebra and trigonometry; or MATH-M 025 and MATH-M 026. Continuation of AST-A 221. For physical science majors. Application of basic principles of gravity, mechanics, optics, and radiation to modern astronomy and astrophysics. Topics typically include stars, stellar populations, interstellar matter, galaxies, cosmology, and observational astronomy from radio to gamma rays. Credit given for only one of AST-A 202 or AST-A 222. (4 credit hours.)
    3. Modern Observational Techniques. One (1) course from the .
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 202, PHYS-P 222, or PHYS-H 222; or consent of instructor. Telescopes, astronomical imaging, spectroscopic and photometric observations, and reductions. (4 credit hours.)
    4. Electives. Two (2) courses from the .
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor . Efficient analysis of quantitative astronomical data requires the use of computers. Helps students build a computational skill set that can be used for carrying out research projects in astronomy/astrophysics or other fields. Covers a range of topics, from the sources of astronomical data to the presentation of the results. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Galactic structure, basic components, kinematics, chemical properties, stellar populations, theories of formation and evolution of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Application of basic physical principles to investigation of the solar system, stars, and the Milky Way galaxy. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Application of basic physical principles to investigation of galaxies and cosmology. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: AST-A 202 or AST-A 222; MATH-M 120, MATH-M 212, or MATH-S 212; and PHYS-P 301 or PHYS-H 301; or consent of instructor. Topics in astrophysics not covered extensively by other courses. The topic will vary depending on instructor. Possible topics include the solar system, celestial mechanics, astrobiology, stellar interiors, stellar atmospheres, stellar populations, galaxy dynamics, and cosmology. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (3 credit hours.)
  4. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Science requirements

The Bachelor of Science degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 36 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 2 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 2 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: Not required
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: Not required
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the first semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.