Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Science in Game Design (GAMEDSGNBS)The Media School

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The B.S. in Game Design takes a social systems approach to game design, emphasizing the creative symbiosis that develops when game designers combine the age-old arts of storytelling and illustration with powerful new media platforms and state-of-the-art animation to translate their vision into compelling virtual realities. The degree shares its structure with the other undergraduate degrees offered in The Media School, including The Media Core (Managing, Making, Thinking Media) and all College degree requirements, but does not require a concentration or specialization.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 54 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.

  1. Media School Core.
    1. Introduction to Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Examines the role media play in our lives-at work, at school, among family members, friends, and lovers-and analyzes pressing issues in media and society today, such as privacy, globalization, and convergence. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Must be an Ernie Pyle Scholar, Media Scholar, or Academic Honors student. Examines the role media play in our lives-at work, at school, among family members, friends, and lovers-and analyzes pressing issues in media and society today, such as privacy, globalization, and convergence. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Managing Media. One (1) course from the .
      • (recommended) Examines what games are and how they are made. Topics include the games industry: its creative dimensions and economic structures; its history and future; the organization of game development teams; the methods and tools used in game production. Students will gain a deeper and more detailed appreciation for this rapidly evolving, fascinating, and sometimes baffling industry. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 200 or TEL-T 260. (3 credit hours.)
      • Pulitzer-winning reporters and other award-winning journalists visit the class to share behind-the-scene details of their projects, their ethical choices and the doubts and challenges they faced along the way. The class explores how journalistic prizes are selected and how they shape the future, not just of journalism, but of democracy. (3 credit hours.)
      • The goal of the course is for students to understand and articulate the issues in global journalism and the role of the media as a participant in shaping societies. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 206 or MSCH-C 206. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introductory analysis, using a case-study method, of how media industries such as broadcasting, cable, and telephone are structured, funded, and regulated; how media organizations create and market programs and products, and how they manage their operations. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to public relations. Examines theory and practice of public relations, how public relations operates in organizations, and its impact on stakeholders and society. Topics include approaches to persuasion, media relations, crisis communication, reputation management, and ethics. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 321, MSCH-C 208, or MSCH-R 321. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Thinking Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Introduces the idea of games systems by breaking down games into their different components to build a deep game literacy. Students will learn how to learn a new game quickly; teach complex games to others; recognize and excel at the many different games played in everyday life. Where most courses have readings, this course has "gamings," required games for students to play and learn. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 210 or TEL-T 366. (3 credit hours.)
    4. Making Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Provides a survey of current technologies for creating games. These tools are also appropriate for projects in virtual and augmented reality and interactive journalism. Students acquire competency in several game engines demonstrated by the creation of several digital game prototypes using recently released tools. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Game Design Developmental Skills.
    1. Game Production I. One (1) course from the .
      • P: MSCH-C 220 or INFO-I 210 with a grade of C- or higher. Students will learn how to make digital game prototypes gaining hands-on experience while working in teams and using game engines such as Unity and Unreal. Students will develop sound teamwork practices such as appropriate and timely communication, version control, and leadership; employ production methods such as agile and waterfall; and develop essential playtesting methods. Credit given for only one of MSCH-G 300 or TEL-T 361. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Game Design I. One (1) course from the .
      • P: MSCH-C 210 or TEL-T 366. Examines the structural and formal elements of games. Explores the theory of game design through deconstruction of tabletop games. Students will create, present, and analyze games in numerous contexts. Credit given for only one of MSCH-G 310 or TEL-T 367. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Game Art and Sound. One (1) course from the .
      • A general introduction to concepts, techniques, and tools for creating audio, visual, and narrative assets used in computer games and digitally mediated environments, including sound editing and synthesis, frame-based and procedural animation, and non-linear story writing. Students will create original sounds, write and edit computer code, and author multiform narratives while studying their roles in emerging and complex systems. Credit given for only one of MSCH-G 320 or TEL-T 284. (3 credit hours.)
  3. Advanced Game Design.
    1. Game Production II. One (1) course from the .
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-G 300 or TEL-T 361. Student development teams take interactive multimedia design skills to the next level learning advanced techniques for conceiving and producing games. Course combines hands-on experience using state-of-the-art game engines and industry production methods such as Agile and Waterfall with practice in overcoming obstacles such as bugs, poor communication, absent leadership. Prototypes will be tested and the results will be reported and analyzed in statistical form. Credit given for only one of MSCH-G 400 or TEL-T 461. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Game Design II. One (1) course from the .
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-G 310 or TEL-T 367. This course will develop the student's ability to design game systems. Readings will be taken from systems design theory, social sciences, and engineering. Students will create systems in different software packages. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Game Workshop I. One (1) course from the .
      • P: A grade of C or higher in MSCH-G 400 and MSCH-G 410. Development and implementation of game design project under direction of faculty supervisor. Credit given for only one of MSCH-G 450 or TEL-T 460. (4 credit hours.)
    4. Game Workshop II. One (1) course from the .
      • P: MSCH-G 450; or consent of faculty supervisor. Teams formed in MSCH-G 450 continue to work on their projects, focusing on the rapid iterative production cycles, working toward a fixed deadline. Impacts on players and culture assessed through testing and critique. Students will be required to submit their prototype to outside competition, such as a juried independent games festival. (4 credit hours.)
    5. Game Workshop III. One (1) course from the .
      • P: A grade of C or better in MSCH-G 460. Development and implementation of a game design project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in MSCH-G 470. (1–6 credit hours.)
  4. Electives.
    1. Focal Area. At least three (3) courses from one (1) of the following focal areas:
        • Covers rigging, 3D animation, 2D animation, motion capture, and best practices for animating for specific platforms like film, games, and commercial uses. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-G 320 or TEL-T 284; or consent of instructor. Lab fee required. Introduces 3D modeling and character development for games. Beginning with concept art, students will learn the tools and techniques to create clean base meshes for game engines. Working form project based examples student will use UV layouts to create characters, props, vehicles, weapons, and static mesh environments. Students will participate in critiques, discuss project deadlines, tools and techniques, methodologies, and results. Credit given for only one of MSCH-G 420 or TEL-T 364. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: MSCH-G 320. Advanced 3D seminar. Topics vary and may include 3D modeling for games and interactive storytelling, 3D modeling for film and television, 3D modeling for the Web, 3D modeling and machinima, programming and scripting for dynamic effects in 3D environments, motion capture and 3D. Credit given for only one of MSCH-G 430 or TEL-T 464. (3 credit hours.)
        • Development of visual awareness and coordination of perceptual and manual skills; seeing, representing, and inventing on an experimental, exploratory level in two dimensions. Includes placement, scale, volume, light, formal articulation, and investigation of graphic tools and media. Credit given for only one of FINA-F 100 or SOAD-A 102. (3 credit hours.)
        • Volume, space, material, and physical force studies provide the basis for exploration of three-dimensional form; includes carving, construction, modeling, and casting using wood, plaster, Styrofoam, clay, etc. Credit given for only one of FINA-F 101 or SOAD-A 103. (3 credit hours.)
        • Preliminary course for advancement in drawing, stressing basic visual awareness; seeing, representing, and technical command on a two-dimensional surface. Problems in handling placement, scale, space, volume, light, and formal articulation. Credit given for only one of FINA-S 200 or SOAD-S 200. (3 credit hours.)
        • Beginning class on digital media's role in the world of art production and reception. Class emphasizes learning to use digital media to produce original, creative art work. Students use Adobe Photoshop, Premiere, Dreamweaver, and Autodesk Mudbox to create their own artworks. Topics include digital imaging, video art, interactive art, and 3D modeling. Credit given for only one of FINA-D 210 or SOAD-S 210. (3 credit hours.)
        • Drawing and perception in the history and practice of visual communication, including a basic introduction to the field and exercises with pencil, marker, computer, and other tools, to produce symbols, letter forms, and symbol-letter combinations. Credit given for only one of FINA-S 250 or SOAD-S 250. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: FINA-S 200 or SOAD-S 200; and one of SOAD-A 101, SOAD-A 102, or consent of instructor. Intermediate course in drawing from the model and other sources. Emphasis on technical command of the media in conjunction with the development of a visual awareness. Continued problems in the articulation of space, scale, volume, value, and linear sensitivity. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in FINA-S 301 and SOAD-S 300. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: FINA-D 210 or SOAD-S 210; or consent of instructor. Hands-on studio course exploring the intersection of art, technology, and human behavior by looking at the various bodies of knowledge that inform the interactive multimedia from storytelling, interaction design, installation, public intervention, and creative coding. This project-based course covers conceptually-oriented digital art practices spanning audio & video production, coding with HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, animation in Adobe After Effects, and physical computing with Arduino. May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours in FINA-D 310 and SOAD-S 310. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: FINA-D 210 or SOAD-S 210; or consent of instructor. Exploration of the medium of video as an aesthetic expression. Time and sound are elements incorporated into visual composition's traditional concerns. Emphasis on technical command of video camera and digital editing procedures in conjunction with development of a visual sensitivity. Readings and a research project are required. Credit given for only one of FINA-D 317 or SOAD-S 311. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: FINA-D 210 or SOAD-S 210; or consent of instructor. Hands-on studio course exploring the technical development of three-dimensional computer graphics for state-of-the-art display systems. Students will investigate user-interface design, create 3D graphical environments, and explore the parallel drives toward content creation and visual aesthetics. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credits in FINA-D 318 and SOAD-S 313. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: FINA-S 351 or SOAD-S 351; or consent of instructor. A thorough set of practical exercises that combine design projects with related information about presentation of ideas through finished designs. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in FINA-S 352 and SOAD-S 352. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: FINA-D 310 or SOAD-S 310; or consent of instructor. Hands-on studio course exploring the intersection of art, technology, and human behavior by looking at the various bodies of knowledge that inform the interactive multimedia from storytelling, interaction design, installation, public intervention, and creative coding. Covers conceptually-oriented digital art practices spanning audio and video production, coding with HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, animation in Adobe After Effects, and physical computing with Arduino. Dialogue of timely issues through readings, screenings, websites, and gallery visits. Emphasis on a more self-guided conceptual practice. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 credit hours in FINA-D 410 and SOAD-S 410. (1–3 credit hours.)
        • P: FINA-D 317 or SOAD-S 311; or consent of instrutor. Advanced study of video's potential in contemporary fine art practice. Students will create a new visual vocabulary using the latest technology including high-definition video systems and interactive DVD authoring. Covers special effects and animation programs that allow artists to further explore the aesthetics of time-based media. May be repeated for a maximum of 20 credit hours in FINA-D 417 and SOAD-S 411. (1–3 credit hours.)
        • P: SOAD-S 313 or FINA-D 318; or consent of instructor. Students develop 3D graphic environments to visualize and conceptualize creative constructs for virtual environments, explore art and spatial simulation, including animation, interaction, lighting, and design. Dialogue of timely issues is encouraged based on readings, videos, CD-ROMs and visits to galleries, Web sites and alternative spaces. May be repeated for a maximum of 20 credit hours in SOAD-S 413 and FINA-D 418. (1–6 credit hours.)
        • P: FINA-S 352 or SOAD-S 352; or consent of instructor. Professional problem solving in graphic design. Using a variety of mediums to communicate messages, students apply processes from printing to multimedia as appropriate for directed projects. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 credit hours in FINA-S 451 and SOAD-S 450. (3–6 credit hours.)
        • Covers working with detailed game data, including formulating questions, specifying statistics, extracting data, isolating variables of interest, analyzing those variables, and visualizing the results. Students will work with industry standard tools, methods, and real-world data. (3 credit hours.)
        • Explores the design of conflict systems for games. Students will learn fundamental theories of conflict design (e.g. game theory) and advanced design tools (e.g. spreadsheets). Theories and tools will be applied to popular video and board games. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: MSCH-G 300 and MSCH-G 310. Provides an intensive introduction to the design and technical development of virtual worlds and massively multiplayer online games (MMOs). Topics include designing for persistence in a virtual world, world simulation, long-term player goals, and social interactivity. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201; MATH-M 119 or equivalent, or higher level calculus course. The economics of consumer choice. The economics of production, cost minimization, and profit maximization for business firms in the short run and long run under various market structures. Competition and adjustment to market equilibrium. Introduction to game theory, strategic interaction, and noncooperative equilibria. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 321 or ECON-S 321. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: ECON-E 321. Mathematical analysis of strategic interaction. Noncooperative games played once or repeatedly, with perfect or imperfect information. Necessary condition for a solution (equilibrium) as well as sufficient conditions (refinements). Cooperative games, such as bargaining and market games. Numerous applications, including experimental games. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: ECON-E 321. Devoted to economic analysis of law, focusing on the economic efficiency of common law. Main components of the course are property law, contracts, and torts; some aspects of criminal law are also covered. Discussion is based mostly on examples, both invented and taken from actual cases. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: ECON-E 321. Only 6 credit hours from ECON-E 308, ECON-E 361, and ECON-E 362 may be counted toward a major in economics. Theory of public goods and externalities. Cost-benefit analysis. Public choice theory. Analysis of specific expenditure, transfer, and regulatory programs. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: ECON-E 321. Only 6 credit hours from ECON-E 308, ECON-E 361, and ECON-E 362 may be counted toward a major in economics. U.S. tax structure, income redistribution effects, and efficiency in resource allocation. Use of welfare theory and microeconomic models to evaluate particular issues. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: ECON-E 321. Empirical analysis of market structure and behavior. Location, technology, economies of scale, vertical integration, conglomerates, barriers to entry, and competitive practices. Economic assessment of product performance and environmental impact. (3 credit hours.)
        • R: To be successful students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 014, MATH-M 018, or MATH-J 111. Sets, counting, basic probability, including random variables and expected values. Linear systems, matrices, linear programming, and applications. Credit given for only one of MATH-A 118, MATH-M 118, MATH-S 118, MATH-V 118; or MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: One of MATH-M 301, MATH-M 303, or MATH-S 303; and one of MATH-M 311 or MATH-S 311. P or C: MATH-M 365. Formation and study of mathematical models used in the biological, social, and management sciences. Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues, and equations of growth. (3 credit hours.)
        • Introduces the design and development of political, economic, and social institutions that support democratic governance or its alternatives. Uses theory to understand connections among individual choice, collective action, institutions, and constitutional order. Institutional analysis as a mode of reasoning about contemporary policy problems, law, and public affairs. (3 credit hours.)
        • May be taken alone or in conjunction with related political science courses. A course tied to simulations of international organizations such as the European Union, the United Nations, or the Organization of American States. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
        • P: One course in political science at the 200 level or above. R: ECON-E 201. Introduces collective choice and game theory for understanding how societies make political decisions. Examines how institutions, or the political context in which decisions are made, affect group choices. Theories of individual and group decision making, collective choice, and social dilemmas. Applications to congressional politics, intergovernmental relations, and parliamentary democracies. (3 credit hours.)
        • One of the following:
          • Fundamentals of univariate and bivariate statistics, construction and interpretation of graphs, and computer-assisted data analysis. Both statistical methodology and theory will be emphasized as well as computer literacy. Students will examine the primary literature in all branches of anthropology to familiarize themselves with the role of statistics in anthropological research. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370, ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300, MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300, PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
          • P: MATH-M 014. CJUS-K 300 covers the properties of single variables, the measurement of association between pairs of variables, and statistical inference. Additional topics, such as the analyses of qualitative and aggregated data, address specific criminal justice concerns. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370, ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300, MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300, PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
          • P: ECON-E 201 and MATH-M 118 or similar course emphasizing probability concepts. R: ECON-E 202 and MATH-M 119. Lectures emphasize the use of basic probability concepts and statistical theory in the estimation and testing of single parameter and multivariate relationships. In computer labs, using Microsoft Excel, each student calculates descriptive statistics, probabilities, and least squares regression coefficients in situations based on current business and economic events. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370; ANTH-A 306; CJUS-K 300; MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310; POLS-Y 395; PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310; SOC-S 371; STAT-K 310 or STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303; or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
          • P: ECON-E 201 and MATH-M 118 or similar course emphasizing probability concepts; Honors student. R: MATH-M 119 and ECON-E 202. Honors course. Designed for students of superior ability. Covers same core material as ECON-E 370 and substitutes for ECON-E 370 as a prerequisite for other courses. Credit given for only one of ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370; ANTH-A 306; CJUS-K 300; MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310; POLS-Y 395; PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310; SOC-S 371; STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303; or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
          • Introduction to methods and statistics used in political inquiry, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, sampling, statistical inference and hypothesis testing, measures of association, analysis of variance, and regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
          • P: One of MATH-M 106, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-M 212, MATH-V 118, or, MATH-V 119. Introduction to statistics; nature of statistical data; ordering and manipulation of data; measures of central tendency and dispersion; elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
          • P: One of MATH-M 106, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-M 212, MATH-V 118, or, MATH-V 119. Introduction to probability and statistics; elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Covers concepts of statistical inference and decision; estimation and hypothesis testing; Bayesian inference; and statistical decision theory. Special topics include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
          • P: MATH-M 014 or equivalent. R: 3 credit hour mathematics course approved for College of Arts and Sciences mathematics requirement. Introduces the logic of statistical inference. Students will learn how to use sample data to reach conclusions about a population of interest by calculating confidence intervals and significance tests. Estimating the effects of multiple independent variables using cross-tabulations and/or regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K 310, STAT-K 310 or STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301, SOC-S 371, or SPEA-K 300. (3 credit hours.)
          • P: MATH-M 014 or equivalent. Lecture and laboratory. Introduction to methods for analyzing quantitative data. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models of data, inference about populations from random samples. Regression and analysis of variance. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301. (4 credit hours.)
          • P: MATH-M 119 or equivalent. Introduction to probability and statistics. Elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation, hypothesis testing, Bayesian inference, statistical decision theory. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
          • P: Math-M 118 or equivalent. Introduction to methods for analyzing data arising in business, designed to prepare business students for the Kelley School’s Integrative Core. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models, fundamental principles of estimation and hypothesis testing, applications to linear regression and quality control. Microsoft Excel used to perform analyses. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300 or STAT-S 301. (3 credit hours.)
          • P: MATH-M 014. Introduction to methods for analyzing data arising in the life sciences, designed for biology, human biology, and pre-medical students. Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, probability models, fundamental principles of estimation and hypothesis testing, inferences about means, correlation, linear regression. Credit given for only one of ANTH-A 306, CJUS-K 300, ECON-E 370 or ECON-S 370, MATH-K 300 or MATH-K 310, POLS-Y 395, PSY-K 300 or PSY-K310, SOC-S 371, SPEA-K 300, or STAT-K 310, STAT-S 300, STAT-S 301, or STAT-S 303. (3 credit hours.)
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • Design game interfaces, integrating them into a game engine. Gain strong visual design skills (typography, color schemes, iconography), learning how to apply them. Finish the course with several portfolio pieces. Beyond game design, the course may be of interest to designers in web and software development. (3 credit hours.)
        • Build simple digital and tabletop games that explore different philosophical and artistic approaches to game creation. Gain the ability to choose appropriate styles to convey a particular message within a game. (3 credit hours.)
        • R: PSY-P 101. An introduction to the neural mechanisms underlying complex cognition, and a survey of topics in neuroscience related to cognition. The course provides a solid background in human biopsychology. If COGS-Q 301 is not offered in a given year, PSY-P 423 Human Neuropsychology may be substituted for this course. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155 . Roboticists know that actions like catching a fly ball are exceedingly complex, yet people perform them effortlessly. How perceptual information is generated by and used in guiding such actions is covered, as are issues of motor coordination and control. Classes include laboratories on analysis of optic flow and limb movements. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 330 or PSY-P 330. (3 credit hours.)
        • R: Mastery of two years of high school algebra or the equivalent. An introduction to the suite of mathematical and logical tools used in the cognitive and information sciences, including finite mathematics, automata and computability theory, elementary probability, and statistics, together with short introductions to formal semantics and dynamical systems. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 350 or COGS-Q 250. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: CSCI-C 211 or consent of instructor. A survey of techniques for machine intelligence and their relation to human intelligence. Topics include modeling techniques, neural networks and parallel processing systems, problem-solving methods, knowledge representation, expert systems, vision, heuristics, production systems, speech perception, and natural language understanding. Students who have completed both COGS-C 463 and COGS-C 464 are exempted from taking this course. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 351 or CSCI-B 351. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: Two semesters of computer programming or consent of instructor. Introduction to the design, construction, and control of autonomous mobile robots. Includes basic mechanics, electronics, and programming for robotics, as well as the applications of robots in cognitive science. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 360 or CSCI-B 355. (3 credit hours.)
        • R: Mastery of two years of high school algebra or the equivalent; PSY-K 300 or equivalent familiarity with statistics. This course develops tools for studying mind and intelligence, including experimental techniques, and mathematical and computational models of human behavior. Topics include neural structures for cognition, attention, perception, memory, problem solving, judgment, decision making, and consciousness. Students will design and analyze laboratory experiments and apply formal models to the results. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 270 or COGS-Q 370. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Roboticists know that actions like catching a fly ball are exceedingly complex, yet people perform them effortlessly. How perceptual information is generated by and used in guiding such actions is covered, as are issues of motor coordination and control. Classes include laboratories on analysis of optic flow and limb movements. Credit given for only one of COGS-Q 330 or PSY-P 330. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Introduction to human cognitive processes, including attention and perception, memory, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 155. Theories and data of experimental psychology applied to the problems of the interaction of people and technology. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: PSY-P 324 or PSY-P 325. Principles, techniques, and applications of behavior modification, including reinforcement, aversive conditioning, observational learning, desensitization, self-control, and modification of cognitions. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: PSY-P 326 or PSY-P 346; and two biology courses (e.g., BIOL-L 112, BIOL-L 211). Concurrent enrollment in PSY-P 346 and biology courses only with consent of the instructor.. Provides an in-depth look at the neurobiological bases of addictions, from the cellular, molecular, and systems neuroscience levels of analysis. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: PSY-P 326, PSY-P 335, or PSY-P 346. An exploration of how individuals make decisions and what different parts of the brain contribute to decision-making. Focuses on the cognitive psychology of decision-making and on exciting recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience of decision-making, including the new field of neuroeconomics. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 101 and MSCH-C 207. Examines principles of media advertising and applications across platforms and audiences. Analyzes the advertising industry structures and processes, including the roles of agencies, creative teams, station representatives, and buyers. Topics include the social and individual effects of advertising, ethical issues in advertising, and considerations for advertising in a global marketplace. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 300, MSCH-A 320, MSCH-A 337, or TEL-T 340. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-A 300, MSCH-C 101, and MSCH-C 207. Students develop creative and implementation skills with intensive practice producing effective integrated communication strategies, concepts, copy, and design for print, broadcast, direct, mobile, digital, and social media campaigns. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 305, MSCH-A 420, or JOUR-J 420. (3 credit hours.)
        • Critical examination of advertising's role in modern societies. Focuses on marketing and consumption as central activities in shaping personal identity and social relations. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 315 or MSCH-A 315. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 101 and MSCH-A 300. Theory and practice of designing, implementing, and evaluating promotional materials and marketing campaigns for television programs, radio formats, cable services, the Web, and new media. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 347 or TEL-T 347. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: JOUR-J 320 or MSCH-A 320; and junior/senior standing; or consent of instructor. Seminar in current developments in advertising as an economic and social force. Examines contemporary issues in the profession. Students will conduct independent and original research projects. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 438 or MSCH-A 438. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: MSCH-A 300, MSCH-A 310, MSCH-C 101, and MSCH-C 207. Provides a detailed examination of the development, execution, and assessment of advertising campaigns. Offers insights into the planning process and an extended opportunity to integrate and apply the principles acquired. Credit given for only one of MSCH-A 441 or TEL-T 441. (3 credit hours.)
        • Introduction to public relations. Examines theory and practice of public relations, how public relations operates in organizations, and its impact on stakeholders and society. Topics include approaches to persuasion, media relations, crisis communication, reputation management, and ethics. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 321, MSCH-C 208, or MSCH-R 321. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; and in MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283; or consent of instructor. The management of commercial and noncommercial telecommunications projects, including television and news media. Organizational, economic/ business, and legal aspects of production management. Credit given for only one of MSCH-M 330 or TEL-T 330. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207; or consent of instructor. Analysis of market structure and behavior of firms and organizations in broadcasting, cable television, motion picture distribution, print media, common carrier, and other communications industries. Policy and strategy applications. Credit given for only one of MSCH-M 421 or TEL-T 421. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207; or consent of instructor. Topical seminar on social and business applications of telecommunications. Exploration of the potential for delivering public and business services via the telecommunications network. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours in MSCH-M 422 and TEL-T 422. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207; or consent of instructor. Study of the skill, processes, and attitudes required for effective management and leadership at all levels in telecommunications operations. Credit given for only one of MSCH-M 446 or TEL-T 446. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: MSCH-C 101; and one of MSCH-C 208, MSCH-J 321, or MSCH-R 321. Theories and principles relevant to public relations research and strategic planning, including development of goals and objectives, client relationships, budgets, and research methods. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in JOUR-H 200, JOUR-J 200, MSCH-C 225, or MSCH-H 225; and in JOUR-J 321 or MSCH-R 321. Develops the professional writing skills expected of beginning public relations practitioners, including different approaches required for a variety of audiences and media. Focus on the basics of good writing as well as the art of writing. Brush up on AP style. Learn how to work effectively with real-world clients. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 349 or MSCH-R 349. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101; and MSCH-C 208 or MSCH-R 321; and MSCH-R 348; all with a grade of C- or higher. Development and execution of a public relations campaign for a non-profit organization. Public relations theory and in-depth care study analysis. Develop a campaign proposal to meet a client's business objectives and learn how to pitch it. Part of the course focuses on media relations and crisis communications training. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 429 or MSCH-R 429. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: MSCH-G 300 and MSCH-G 310. Provides an intensive introduction to the design and technical development of virtual worlds and massively multiplayer online games (MMOs). Topics include designing for persistence in a virtual world, world simulation, long-term player goals, and social interactivity. (3 credit hours.)
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • CSCI-B 351
        • CSCI-B 453
        • P: CSCI-C 241 and CSCI-C 343. Introduction to database concepts and systems. Topics include database models and systems: hierarchical, network, relational, and object-oriented; database design principles; structures for efficient data access; query languages and processing; database applications development; views; security; concurrency; recovery. Students participate in a project to design, implement, and query a database, using a standard database system. Credit given for only one of CSCI-B 461 or CSCI-B 561. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: CSCI-C 343; and MATH-M 301 or MATH-M 303. Computer graphics techniques. Introduction to graphics hardware and software. Two-dimensional graphics methods, transformations, and interactive methods. Three-dimensional graphics, transformations, viewing geometry, object modeling, and interactive manipulation methods. Basic lighting and shading. Video and animation methods. Credit given for only one of CSCI-B 481 or CSCI-B 581. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: High school precalculus math. A first course in computer science for those intending to take advanced computer science courses. Introduction to programming and to algorithm design and analysis. Using the Scheme programming language, the course covers several programming paradigms. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, CSCI-H 211, or CSCI-A 591. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211.. Design of computer software systems and introduction to programming in the environment of a contemporary operating system. Topics include a modern object-oriented programming language; building and maintaining large projects; and understanding the operating system interface. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 592, CSCI-C 212, CSCI-H 212, or ENGR-E 111. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: CSCI-A 201, CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, or INFO-I 211.. This course provides an introduction to programming in a Unix (Linux) environment using the C language. The key ideas to be discussed are: the Unix shell, file system and basic shell commands; the emacs text editor; and the C programming language. (1.5 credit hours.)
        • CSCI-C 292
        • P: CSCI-C 212. Design and implementation of complex software systems and applications exploiting the object-oriented paradigm. Selection and effective utilization of object-oriented libraries and interfaces. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: High school precalculus math. Honors version of CSCI-C 211. A first course in computer science for those intending to take advanced computer science courses. Introduction to programming and to algorithm design and analysis. Using the Scheme programming language, the course covers several programming paradigms. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 591, CSCI-C 200, CSCI-C 211, or CSCI-H 211. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211. Honors version of CSCI-C 212. Design of computer software systems and introduction to programming in the environment of a contemporary operating system. Topics include a modern object-oriented programming language; building and maintaining large projects; and understanding the operating system interface. Lecture and laboratory. Credit given for only one of CSCI-A 592, CSCI-C 212, CSCI-H 212, or ENGR-E 111. (4 credit hours.)
        • P: CSCI-C 343. Analysis design, and implementation of information systems. Project specification. Data modeling. Software design methodologies. Software quality assurance. Supervised team development of a real system for a real client. Credit not given for both CSCI-P 465 and CSCI-P 565. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; and in MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283; and consent of instructor. Intermediate-level hands-on production course that concentrates on the planning and production of audio materials for radio, video, and interactive media. Topics include sound theory, recording, and editing. Includes analog and digital technologies. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P353 or TEL-T 353. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 228, MSCH-G 320, TEL-T 283, or TEL-T 284; or consent of instructor. Lab fee required. Develops basic sound design technique for linear and nonlinear media (video, animation, games, and interactive content). Explores basic concepts of sound in the context of audiovisual relationships through production and analysis. Develops media communication skills through the use of sound and image. Credit given for only one of MSCH-P 369 or TEL-T 369. (3 credit hours.)
        • P: Consent of instructor and demonstrated background in MIDI and composition. Junior standing. Specialized techniques course developing students' skills in music scoring for visual media. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 18 credit hours. (1–3 credit hours.)
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
        • No description is available for this course.
    2. Restricted Electives. Two (2) courses from the .
      • Any Media School course
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • No description is available for this course.
      • Another course approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies
  5. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Science requirements

The Bachelor of Science degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 36 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the first semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.