Majors, minors + certificates

Concentration in Sports Media (Bachelor of Arts in Media) (MDAC07)The Media School

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

Sports Media students learn about the process of communication within the sporting world. They build a foundation based on sports writing, broadcasting, online media, advertising and video production, and learn the differences between content rooted in journalism and content rooted in organizational communication. Throughout the program, students receive valuable hands-on training in their focal area that prepares them for fulfilling careers as sports commentators, broadcasters, content creators and managers in the sports media world.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 36 credit hours (12 in the Media Core, 15 in the Concentration, and 9 in the Specialization), including the requirements listed below.

  1. Media School Core. Each of the following:
    1. Introduction to Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Examines the role media play in our lives-at work, at school, among family members, friends, and lovers-and analyzes pressing issues in media and society today, such as privacy, globalization, and convergence. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Must be an Ernie Pyle Scholar or Media Scholar. Examines the role media play in our lives-at work, at school, among family members, friends, and lovers-and analyzes pressing issues in media and society today, such as privacy, globalization, and convergence. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Managing Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Examines what games are and how they are made. Topics include the games industry: its creative dimensions and economic structures; its history and future; the organization of game development teams; the methods and tools used in game production. Students will gain a deeper and more detailed appreciation for this rapidly evolving, fascinating, and sometimes baffling industry. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 200 or TEL-T 260. (3 credit hours.)
      • Pulitzer-winning reporters and other award-winning journalists visit the class to share behind-the-scene details of their projects, their ethical choices and the doubts and challenges they faced along the way. The class explores how journalistic prizes are selected and how they shape the future, not just of journalism, but of democracy. (3 credit hours.)
      • The goal of the course is for students to understand and articulate the issues in global journalism and the role of the media as a participant in shaping societies. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 206 or MSCH-C 206. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introductory analysis, using a case-study method, of how media industries such as broadcasting, cable, and telephone are structured, funded, and regulated; how media organizations create and market programs and products, and how they manage their operations. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 207 or TEL-T 207. (3 credit hours.)
      • Introduction to public relations. Examines theory and practice of public relations, how public relations operates in organizations, and its impact on stakeholders and society. Topics include approaches to persuasion, media relations, crisis communication, reputation management, and ethics. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 321, MSCH-C 208, or MSCH-R 321. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Thinking Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Introduces the idea of games systems by breaking down games into their different components to build a deep game literacy. Students will learn how to learn a new game quickly; teach complex games to others; recognize and excel at the many different games played in everyday life. Where most courses have readings, this course has "gamings," required games for students to play and learn. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 210 or TEL-T 366. (3 credit hours.)
      • Critically examines how gender and sexuality are mediated through screen and audio-visual media (including film, video, television, radio, internet) and their cultural contexts. Using humanities approaches, topics might focus on popular media production; various genres, movements, and media cycles; specific cultural and historical contexts; impacts of technological change. Screenings may be required. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 203 or MSCH-C 211. (3 credit hours.)
      • Critically examines how race and/or ethnicity are mediated through screen and audio-visual media (including film, video, television, radio, internet) and their cultural contexts.  Using humanities approaches, topics might focus on representations and debates within mainstream, art, or alternative media.  May address histories of race, racism, and racial justice.  Screenings may be required. Credit given for only one of CMCL-C 201 or MSCH-C 212. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course examines the construction of social meaning associated with mediated messages as well as the range of uses and consequences of exposure to mediated messages in individuals, groups, organizations, and society. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 213 or TEL-T 205. (3 credit hours.)
      • This course addresses the psychology of racial prejudice and stereotyping and uses this social-scientific framework to examine the impact of media portrayals. We will focus on how race influences our media consumption decisions and how exposure to certain media messages (in entertainment, news, music, video games) could change racial stereotypes. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 214 or TEL-T 191. (3 credit hours.)
      • Covers the origin and development of the videogame.  Topics include the location and platforms for gaming (arcades, home game consoles, personal computers); social and cultural impacts (stereotypes, gender roles, media effects, violence, regulation and intellectual property); new gaming trends (mobile and social gaming, free-to-play, and cloud gaming). Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 215 or TEL-T 160. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examines the representation of women in the media and analyzes women's creative work as media producers from a social scientific perspective. The course will include lecture and discussion of areas of critical debate: visual representation across media platforms, women's employment in media industries; women as an audience/consumer group. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 216 or TEL-T 192. (3 credit hours.)
      • Offers an interdisciplinary and historical context for understanding contemporary western 'image culture' by addressing the notion of the 'image' in a wide range of its theoretical, critical, and practical contexts, uses, and history. Examines the claim that our culture is more imagistic than others historically, asking how the roles of images have changed over time in relation to other modes of signification. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 217 or CMCL-C 208. (3 credit hours.)
      • Examination of the social and financial relationships between sports organizations, media and society. Study of the social implications of sports media content in light of economic connections between sports media and college and professional sports teams, including how television contracts influence media coverage and how organization-based media influence audience perceptions. (3 credit hours.)
      • Surveys media industries, products, and publics outside the United States context (e.g., Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America). Analyzes regional media in relation to local/global historical, economic, and social processes. Screenings may be required. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 219 or CMCL-C 202. (3 credit hours.)
    4. Making Media. One (1) course from the .
      • Provides a survey of current technologies for creating games. These tools are also appropriate for projects in virtual and augmented reality and interactive journalism. Students acquire competency in several game engines demonstrated by the creation of several digital game prototypes using recently released tools. (3 credit hours.)
      • Style, form, and preparation of written materials for electronic media. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 221 or TEL-T 211. (3 credit hours.)
      • Provides a conceptual framework for writing, designing, and evaluating a variety of media products. This is not a hands-on production course but does offer an overview of the production process. Topics include scriptwriting, production design, visualization, composition, editing styles, and others. This course is a prerequisite for advanced-level courses in the design/production area. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Completion of the English Composition requirement; and a grade of C- or higher in MSCH-J 170 or completion of the Media School Placement Test (MPE). Working seminar stressing the creation of journalistic stories for diverse audiences. Students will learn to develop story ideas, gather information, combine visual and verbal messages, and to write and edit news. Credit given for only one of JOUR-H 200, JOUR-J 200, MSCH-C 225, or MSCH-H 225. (3 credit hours.)
      • Theories of visual communication including human perception, psychology of color, and principles of design. Application of those theories to photography, video, and computer graphic design in news communication. Credit given for only one of JOUR-J 210 or MSCH-C 226. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 101 or MSCH-H 101; and MSCH-C 223. Introductory hands-on video production course builds on fundamentals of audio/visual storytelling through training in the creative use of cameras, lighting and sound equipment, and editing software. Students design, develop, shoot, edit and deliver original videos in both single-camera field production and multi-camera TV studio production environments. Credit given for only one of MSCH-C 228 or TEL-T 283. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Concentration.
    1. Sports Media Literacy. One (1) course from the .
      • P: MSCH-C 221, MSCH-C 225, MSCH-C 226, or MSCH-C 228. Prepares students for careers in sports journalism and sports media by introducing them to key concepts, historical elements, and future considerations within the nexus of sports and media. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Media Internship. One (1) course from the .
      • (this course must be taken for three (3) credit hours to fulfill this requirement) P: At least junior standing; at least 12 credit hours completed in the school; and application for internship credit approved by the school. Application is available on the Media School website. Faculty-supervised work in a media field related to student's academic interests. Credits based on at least 45 work hours per credit hour with a maximum of 6 credit hours applied toward the B.A. in Media or the B.S. in Game Design. Student must write a critical analysis paper and be evaluated by a workplace supervisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 382, MSCH-I 382, MSCH-I 497, MSCH-X 472, or TEL-T 497. (1–3 credit hours.)
    3. Electives. Three (3) courses from the .
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-B 330 or MSCH-C 227. Overview of the sports media industry including processes of content distribution, finance, and technology. Provides historical background of the business of media. Students learn about the symbiotic financial relationship between sports and the media, including team- and league-based media that compete with traditional media. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-C 225. Instruction on elements of news gathering and writing within the sports world. Topics include effective leads, deadline coverage, feature story writing, column writing, negotiation with and interviewing sports sources, diversity in sports, ethical reporting, effective research, and clarity in writing. Emphasis on daily writing. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-B 330. Techniques for sports broadcasting, with particular focus on play-by-play and analysis during live audio and visual coverage. Focus is on preparation for broadcasts, description of live action in a sports setting, and effective extemporaneous speaking. Students participate in live, on-air broadcasts of sporting events. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-B 330. Focuses on effective use of social media channels for news distribution, communication with consumers, source development, and personal brand building. Provides contextual background on various social media, and engages in targeted exercises to develop abilities to effectively communicate within these media. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-C 225 or MSCH-C 226. Provides aspiring sports journalists with the skills they need to put together video packages. Teaches individuals how to tell a story with a visual narrative and the process of finding the story, setting up the story, shooting the story, writing the story and editing the story. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-B 330; and one of MSCH-B 331, MSCH-B 332, MSCH-B 333, MSCH-B 334, or MSCH-B 340. Designed to simulate a working sports media newsroom. Students will be asked to consistently produce professional-caliber sports media content and/or contribute senior-level editing, management, and decision-making skills to the process of creating, promoting, and disseminating that content. Each student will work with the professor individually to assess their coursework. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: MSCH-B 332. Utilizes a series of projects to provide hands-on experience in sourcing, long-form writing, in-depth research, accuracy, fairness, story pitching, and self-editing. Requires the production of multiple stories with multiple sources throughout the course. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Topical course dealing with changing subjects and material from term to term. May be repeated for credit with different topics in JOUR-J 360 and MSCH-J 360. (1–4 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: At least junior standing; and consent of instructor. Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and materials from term to term. May be repeated for credit with different topics in JOUR-J 460 and MSCH-J 460. (1–4 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 223 or TEL-T 206; and in MSCH-C 228, MSCH-G 320, TEL-T 283, or TEL-T 284; and in two 300-level production courses; and consent of instructor. A capstone course for those in production sequence. Students plan, direct, and produce programs or program segments that may air on WTIU, Indiana University's public television station. May be repeated with different topics in MSCH-P 436 and TEL-T 436. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • P: A grade of C- or higher in MSCH-C 207; or consent of instructor. Seminar exploring issues in televised sports in support of and in conflict with other cultural icons in society, business, and education. Includes writing on the ways sports, as program content, influences the television industry and on the ways television influences college and professional sports. Credit given for only one of MSCH-S 445 or TEL-T 445. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics only; see academic advisor) Analysis of selected problems in media studies. Topics vary each semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in CMCL-C 334 and MSCH-V 334. (3 credit hours.)
    4. Additional Requirements.
      • At least nine (9) credit hours in the concentration must be at the 300–499 level.
      • Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the concentration.
      • A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the concentration—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
  3. Specialization.
    • One (1) Media Specialization (see list below)
  4. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Arts requirements

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines. No more than 42 of these credit hours can come from the major.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 42 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 4 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: 1 course
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.