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Liberal Arts and Management Program

Bachelor of Arts in Management and Human Organization

Students on Summer 2020, Fall 2020, or Spring 2021 requirements MGTHORGBA

The Bachelor of Arts in Management and Human Organization allows students to gain skills and competencies relevant to business and professional work while developing the skills and habits of mind that are the hallmark of a liberal arts perspective. Students complete a core set of courses and choose a concentration in Management and Communication or Organizations and Institutions.

Requirements

The major requires at least 42 credit hours, including the requirements listed below.
  1. MHO Core.
    1. Communication. One (1) course:
      • LAMP-M 201 Arts of Communication
    2. Ways of Knowing. One (1) course:
      • LAMP-M 301 Evidence, Analysis, and Ways of Knowing
    3. Ethics. One (1) course:
      • LAMP-M 302 Ethics and Responsible Management
    4. Diversity, Difference, Conflict. One (1) course:
      • AAAD-A 355 African American History I
      • AAAD-A 356 African American History II
      • ANTH-E 344 On The Move Across Asia: Gender, Migration, Mobility
      • LAMP-M 303 Business and Inequality in the 21st Century
      • HIST-A 355 African American History I
      • HIST-A 356 African American History II
      • POLS-Y 301 Political Parties and Interest Groups
      • POLS-Y 316 Public Opinion and Political Participation
      • POLS-Y 353 The Politics of Gender and Sexuality
      • PSY-P 304 Social Psychology and Individual Differences
      • SOC-S 217 Social Inequality
      • SOC-S 230 Society and the Individual
      • SOC-S 335 Race and Ethnic Relations
      • SOC-S 338 Sociology of Gender
    5. Business Concepts. Both of the following:
      1. Accounting. One (1) course:
        • BUS-A 200
        • BUS-A 304 FINANCIAL REPORTING AND ANALYSIS
        • BUS-A 306
      2. Management. One (1) course:
        • BUS-F 300 INTRODUCTORY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
        • BUS-J 306 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP
    6. Microeconomics. One (1) course:
      • ECON-B 251 Fundamentals of Economics for Business I
      • ECON-E 251
    7. Professional Writing. One (1) course:
      • ENG-W 231 Professional Writing Skills
      • ENG-W 240 Community Service Writing
      • ENG-W 321 Advanced Technical Writing
      • ENG-W 350 Advanced Expository Writing (only when it includes a service learning component)
    8. Statistics. One (1) course:
      • ANTH-A 306 Anthropological Statistics
      • CJUS-K 300 Techniques of Data Analysis
      • ECON-E 370 Statistical Analysis for Business and Economics
      • ECON-S 370 Statistical Analysis for Business and Economics: Honors
      • POLS-Y 395 Quantitative Political Analysis
      • PSY-K 300 Statistical Techniques
      • PSY-K 310 Statistical Techniques
      • SOC-S 371 Statistics in Sociology
      • STAT-K 310 Statistical Techniques
      • STAT-S 300 Introduction to Applied Statistical Methods
      • STAT-S 301 Applied Statistical Methods for Business
    9. Capstone. One (1) course:
      • LAMP-M 401 Capstone Seminar
  2. Liberal Arts.
    • Liberal Arts 1. One (1) course:
      • AAAD-A 332 Art of the Civil Rights Movement
      • AAAD-A 380 Contemporary Black American Writing
      • ARTH-A 203 Machine Age Modern: European Modernism, 1848-1939
      • ARTH-A 393 Museums: The Display of Culture
      • CJUS-P 316 Crime in the Movies
      • EALC-E 100 East Asia: An Introduction
      • EALC-E 271 Modern and Contemporary Japanese Culture
      • EALC-E 333 Studies in Chinese Cinema
      • ENG-L 240 Literature and Public Life
      • ENG-L 389 Feminist Literary and Cultural Criticism
      • ENG-L 396 Studies in African American Literature and Culture
      • ENG-R 224 Persuasion
      • ENG-R 321 Rhetoric, Law, and Culture
      • ENG-R 398 Culture, Identity, and the Rhetoric of Place
      • FOLK-E 345 Hip Hop Music and Culture
      • FOLK-F 377 Popular Culture and Politics in the Middle East
      • HISP-P 412 Brazil: The Cultural Context
      • JSTU-C 340 The Kibbutz in Fact and Fiction
      • PHIL-P 240 Business and Morality - Ethics in Context
      • PHIL-P 342 Problems of Ethics
      • PHIL-P 375 Philosophy of Law
      • PHIL-P 376 Leadership and Philosophy
      • POLS-Y 212 Making Democracy Work
      • POLS-Y 379 Ethics and Public Policy
      • POLS-Y 383 Foundations of American Political Thought
      • POLS-Y 384 Developments in American Political Thought
      • REL-C 320 African American Religions
      • REL-C 323 Jews and Race in the United States
      • REL-C 325 Race, Religion, and Ethnicity in the Americas
      • REL-C 330 Evangelical America
      • REL-D 350 Religion, Ethics, and the Environment
    • Liberal Arts 2. One (1) course:
      • AAAD-A 382 Black Community, Law, and Social Change
      • AAAD-A 420 Transforming Divided Communities and Societies
      • ANTH-E 317 Ethnographies of Media Worlds
      • ANTH-E 383 A World of Work
      • ANTH-E 418 Globalization and Consumer Culture
      • ANTH-E 420 Economic Anthropology
      • ANTH-E 438 Communication in the Digital Age
      • ANTH-P 332 Industrial Archaeology
      • CJUS-P 311 Private Security
      • CJUS-P 380 Dispute Management
      • CJUS-P 408 Mass Imprisonment
      • CJUS-P 457 Seminar on White-Collar Crime
      • EALC-E 190 The Rise of China: Challenges and Opportunities for East Asia
      • EALC-E 342 Modern Korean History
      • EALC-E 369 Modern Japanese History
      • EALC-E 386 United States-East Asian Relations
      • EALC-E 393 China's Political Economy
      • EALC-E 395 Japan in World Trade and Politics
      • ENG-R 348 Environmental Communication
      • GEOG-G 332 Geographical Globalization
      • GEOG-G 352 Food and Poverty in America
      • GEOG-G 417
      • GEOG-G 448 Capitalism and Nature
      • GEOG-G 469 Food and Global Poverty
      • GEOG-G 478 Global Change, Food, and Farming Systems
      • HIST-A 200 Issues in United States History (Approved topics: "HISTORY OF CAPITALISM" (TPC 57); "US HISTORY & CURRENT EVENTS" (TPC 53))
      • HIST-A 363 Hoosier Nation: Indiana in American History
      • HIST-A 385 America's Pacific
      • HIST-A 386 History of the American Home
      • HIST-G 200 Issues in Asian History (Approved topics: "BUSINESS IN CHINESE HISTORY" (TPC 303))
      • HIST-G 369 Modern Japan
      • HIST-G 385 Modern China
      • HIST-J 300 Seminar In History (Approved topics: "HISTORY OF CAPITALISM" (TPC 134))
      • HIST-W 225 The Rich
      • HIST-W 330 Money and History
      • INST-I 320 Contemporary India: History, Politics, and Society
      • POLS-P 302 The Politics of Economic Crisis and Reform
      • POLS-Y 324 Gender and Politics
      • POLS-Y 326 American Social Welfare Policy
      • POLS-Y 332 Russian Politics
      • POLS-Y 333 Chinese Politics
      • POLS-Y 337 Latin American Politics
      • POLS-Y 338 African Politics
      • POLS-Y 340 East European Politics
      • POLS-Y 343 The Politics of International Development
      • POLS-Y 350 Politics of the European Union
      • POLS-Y 374 International Organization
      • POLS-Y 376 International Political Economy
      • POLS-Y 399
      • PSY-P 323 Industrial/Organizational Psychology
      • SOC-S 210 Economic Sociology
      • SOC-S 315 Work in the New Economy
      • SOC-S 326 Law and Society
      • SOC-S 339 The Sociology of Media
    • Liberal Arts Electives. Two (2) courses:
      • Additional course(s) from Liberal Arts 1 list
      • Additional course(s) from Liberal Arts 2 list
  3. Disciplinary or Interdisciplinary Knowledge. One (1) of the following:
    1. Non-College Option. Complete any minor from Kelley School of Business or the O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs.
    2. College Option. With approval of the Program Director and Director of Undergraduate Studies, complete a minor, certificate, or second major or degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, including the Media School, Hamilton-Lugar School of Global and International Studies, or Eskenazi School of Art, Architecture, and Design
  4. Major GPA, Hours, and Minimum Grade Requirements.
    1. Major GPA. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    2. Major Minimum Grade. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    3. Major Upper Division Credit Hours. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    4. Major Residency. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    5. College Breadth. At least 58 credit hours must be completed in courses from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines outside of the major area.

Major Area Courses

Unless otherwise noted below, the following courses are considered in the academic program and will count toward academic program requirements as appropriate:

  • Any course at the 100–499 level with the LAMP subject area prefix—as well as any other subject areas that are deemed functionally equivalent
  • Any course contained on the course lists for the academic program requirements at the time the course is taken—as well as any other courses that are deemed functionally equivalent—except for those listed only under Addenda Requirements
  • Any course directed to a non-Addenda requirement through an approved exception

This program of study cannot be combined with the following:

  • Certificate in Liberal Arts and Management (LAMPACRT)

Exceptions to and substitutions for major requirements may be made with the approval of the unit's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.