Majors, minors + certificates

Bachelor of Science in Apparel Merchandising (APMDBS1)Eskenazi School of Art, Architecture + Design

Students on Summer 2019, Fall 2019, or Spring 2020 requirements.

Description

The Bachelor of Science in Apparel Merchandising exposes students to every aspect of the retail cycle, from the research and manufacturing phases to merchandising and retail selling, allowing them to develop their creative and analytical skills. The Apparel Merchandising curriculum examines consumer-oriented and aesthetic components of the near environment and offers students a comprehensive examination of merchandising as it relates to the retailing industry of tomorrow. Coursework includes product basics as well as current industry trends, coupled with a minor such as one of the Kelley School of Business Minors, the Minor in Fashion Design, or other minor approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students prepare for a variety of careers in retail buying, retail management, product development, consumer services, visual merchandising, fashion promotion, retail account coordination, wholesale sales, brand management, merchandising management, sourcing, product manufacturing, and merchandise analysis.

Major requirements

The major requires at least 44 credit hours (60–66 with the Addenda requirements), including the requirements listed below.

  1. Introductory Courses.
    1. SOAD Pathways. One (1) course from the .
      • Explores the fields of art, design, and merchandising within the contemporary landscape of creating and making. Identifies where these disciplines have mutually reinforcing values and opportunities for interdisciplinary study. Provides a common experience for art, design and merchandising students. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Introduction to Apparel Merchandising. One (1) course from the .
      • Introduction to the retail cycle related to the interdisciplinary study of and research in apparel and textiles. Examines social and economic theories underlying the fashion business, retail merchandising principles, consumer behavior, and contemporary retail issues. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 209, SOAD-M 109, or SOAD-M 209. (3 credit hours.)
  2. Apparel Merchandising Foundations.
    1. Materials for Merchandising and Fashion Design. One (1) course from the .
      • P: SOAD-A 100, SOAD-M 109, SOAD-M 209, or AMID-R 100 with a grade of C- or higher.. Lecture plus laboratory. Course fee required. Textile fibers, yarns, fabrication, and finishes, textile processing and properties; selection and care of textiles for human use. Credit given for only one of AMID-F 203 or SOAD-F 203. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Manufacturing and Quality Analysis. One (1) course from the .
      • P: SOAD-M 109, SOAD-M 209, AMID-R 100, or AMID-R 209 with a grade of C- or higher. Focuses on the manufacturing and product development stage of the retail cycle. This stage comprises apparel merchandising history, technology, textiles, performance, value, and quality analysis. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 204 or SOAD-M 204. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Principals of Retail Merchandising. One (1) course from the .
      • P: Grade of C- or higher in SOAD-M 109, SOAD-M 209, AMID-R 100, or AMID-R 209; and in BUS-K 201; and in MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119, or equivalent; and at least sophomore standing. An examination of the contemporary retail environment as it relates to principles, such as the profit and loss analysis, retail math, markups, markdowns, and turnover. Comprehensive analysis and strategy development using retail merchandising principles are emphasized. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 315 or SOAD-M 315. (3 credit hours.)
    4. International Textiles and Apparel. One (1) course from the .
      • P: SOAD-F 203 or AMID-F 203; and ECON-E 201 or ECON-E 202; and at least junior standing. International factors affecting the United States textile, apparel, and retail industries, including comparative analysis of the economic, political, and social implications of globalization. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 404 or SOAD-M 404. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: SOAD-F 203 or AMID-F 203; and ECON-E 201 or ECON-E 202; and at least junior standing. Global and country-specific factors that impact distribution systems for—and consumption of—fashion-related products. Promotes an understanding of consumers of fashion products within a global context and motivations for pursuing a global marketing and retailing strategy. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 405 or SOAD-M 405. (3 credit hours.)
    5. Planning and Analysis. One (1) course from the .
      • P: SOAD-M 315 or AMID-R 315 with a grade of C- or higher. Essentials of merchandise buying and planning: consumer trends, market resources and trade practices, seasonal plans, assortment planning and analytic tools for inventory evaluations. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 413 or SOAD-M 413. (3 credit hours.)
  3. Advanced Electives. Nine (9) credit hours from the .
    • P: SOAD-A 100, SOAD-M 109, SOAD-M 209, or AMID-R 100 with a grade of C- or higher. Analysis and application of concepts learned in lecture: fibers, fabrications, finishes, and properties. Special attention paid to aesthetics of textiles and materials for fashion design. Laboratory course. Course fee required. Credit given for only one of AMID-F 202 or SOAD-F 202. (1 credit hour.)
    • P: At least junior standing. Strategic marketing communication centered on building and maintaining brand equity, encompassing all stages of the retail cycle. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 308 or SOAD-M 308. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: SOAD-M 109, SOAD-M 209, AMID-R 100, or AMID-R 209; and at least sophomore standing. Application of design elements and principles to commercial display and development of creative visual merchandising techniques; various media explored. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 309 or SOAD-M 309. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: SOAD-M 109, SOAD-M 209, AMID-R 100, or AMID-R 209; and at least sophomore standing. Design thinking will be used to study strategic product management in the current retail environment. Function and practices in product distribution, merchandising and retail selling to the end use consumer segments of the retail cycle will be examined as they relate to contemporary retail store management and operations. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 316 or SOAD-M 316. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: SOAD-M 204 or AMID-R 204; and at least junior standing; or consent of department. Functions and practices of product development; understanding and defining the customer; researching fashion trends from color and fabric to silhouette; identifying how and when to apply trends to targeted customers; practical application of executing concepts into finished products. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 327 or SOAD-M 327. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: SOAD-M 109, SOAD-M 204, SOAD-M 209, AMID-R 204, or AMID-R 209; and Apparel Merchandising major; and at least sophomore standing. Digital applications used to develop product lines, including fabric and material development, print and pattern development, graphics, knits, and woven applications. Credit given for only one of SOAD-M 328 or AMID-R 328. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Application of Human-Centered Design (HCD, aka. design thinking) in omnichannel merchandising to develop innovative omnichannel solutions and improve consumer/human experience. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 350 or SOAD-M 350. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Grade of C- or higher in SOAD-F 203 or AMID-F 203 ; and in ECON-E 201 or ECON-E 202; and at least junior standing; and Apparel Merchandising major or minor. Exploration and analysis of the current practices of digital customer behaviors and businesses, while engaging in the development of innovative digital strategies. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Consent of instructor. Study tour designed as an overview of the retail, apparel, and textile industry, taught through a series of seminars conducted by business professionals outside the Bloomington community. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 409 or SOAD-M 409. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: At least junior standing. Explores the entrepreneurial concept through the use of the entire retail cycle related to the vision of developing a business plan and ultimately opening a retail business selling unit. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 410 or SOAD-M 410. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: SOAD-M 109, SOAD-M 204, SOAD-M 209, AMID-R 100, AMID-R 204, or AMID-R 209; and at least junior standing. Issues and strategies of global sourcing in the apparel industry: natural resources, labor issues, factory profiles, quota and duty issues of key sourcing centers. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 412 or SOAD-M 412. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: Senior standing. Examination of sustainability concepts as applied to decision making throughout the process of product design, development, retailing, use, and disposal. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 416 or SOAD-M 416. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: At least junior standing. In-depth study of customer-driven thinking supported by the understanding and study of retail research, design, branding, marketing and sales strategies. Credit given for only one of AMID-R 450 or SOAD-M 450. (3 credit hours.)
    • P: At least junior standing; and Apparel Merchandising majors and minors; or consent of instructor. Advanced selected topics in an area of apparel merchandising. Topics vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours in AMID-R 485, AMID-R 492, and SOAD-M 485. (1–3 credit hours.)
    • Up to six (6) credit hours of the following:
      • P: SOAD major; completion of at least 26 credit hours; and consent of instructor. For merchandising and/or fashion design experience, SOAD-A 100, SOAD-M 109, SOAD-M 209, AMID-R 100, or AMID-R 209; for interior design experience, SOAD-D 272 or AMID-D 272. Provides SOAD majors an off-campus supervised and coordinated career-work experience in a cooperating business, a consumer agency, or other related fields. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours in AMID-F 403, AMID-R 321, AMID-X 373, AMID-X 376, AMID-X 476, AMID-Y 398, SOAD-X 373, SOAD-X 376, and SOAD-X 476. S/F grading. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • P: SOAD-M 315 or AMID-R 315; and consent of department. Provides apparel merchandising majors a supervised and coordinated work experience in the apparel industry. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours in AMID-F 403, AMID-R 321, AMID-X 373, AMID-X 376, AMID-X 476, AMID-Y 398, SOAD-X 373, SOAD-X 376, and SOAD-X 476. (1–3 credit hours.)
      • P: SOAD-M 109 or SOAD-M 209; and 6 additional credit hours in apparel merchandising (SOAD-M); and consent of instructor. Independent coursework or project under supervision on problems of special interest. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in AMID-R 490, AMID-X 492 and SOAD-X 492. (1–3 credit hours.)
  4. Career Course. One (1) course from the .
    • P: SOAD-M 109, SOAD-M 209, AMID-R 100, or AMID-R 209; and at least sophomore standing. Professional techniques and competencies applicable to careers in the retail industry are explored while students participate in exercises to develop presentation skills and marketing themselves to, and in, a retail organization. Credit given for only one of SOAD-M 219, SOAD-M 319 or AMID-R 319. (2 credit hours.)
    • Explores the relationship between academic and extracurricular choices and life after graduation. Students assess their skills, develop a portfolio to highlight them, and create a plan to address gaps. Focuses on a paradigm of job searching that emphasizes research and highly customized, focused application materials. Credit given for only one of the following: ASCS-Q 296, BUS-T 275, or SPEA-V 252. (2 credit hours.)
  5. Additional Requirements.
    1. Introduction to Business Computing. One (1) course from the .
      • No description is available for this course.
    2. Introduction to Economics. One (1) course from the .
      • Scarcity, opportunity cost, competitive and non-competitive market pricing, and interdependence as an analytical core. Individual sections apply this core to a variety of current economic policy problems, such as poverty, pollution, excise taxes, rent controls, and farm subsidies. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: ECON-E 201 or ECON-S 201. Measuring and explaining aggregate economic performance, money, monetary policy, and fiscal policy as an analytical core. Individual sections apply this core to a variety of current economic policy problems, such as inflation, unemployment, and economic growth. (3 credit hours.)
    3. Introduction to Psychology. One (1) course from the .
      • Introduction to psychology; its methods, data, and theoretical interpretations in areas of learning, sensory psychology, and psychophysiology. Credit given for only one of PSY-P 101, PSY-P 106, PSY-P 151, or PSY-P 155. Equivalent to IUPUI PSY-B 105 and PSY-P 151. (3 credit hours.)
    4. Introduction to Sociology. One (1) course from the .
      • Introduction to the concepts and methods of sociology with an emphasis on understanding of contemporary American society. (3 credit hours.)
  6. Addenda Requirements*.
    1. Finite or Calculus Mathematics. One (1) course from the .
      • P: MATH-D 116 or consent of the department. MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117 is a two-course sequence. Topics for the course are taken from MATH-M 118. Credit for the College of Arts and Sciences Foundations requirement in Mathematical Modeling or the College's N&M Breadth of Inquiry requirement will be given only upon completion of both MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117 with a passing grade. Credit given for only one of MATH-A 118, MATH-M 118, MATH-S 118, MATH-V 118; or MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117. (2 credit hours.)
      • P: MATH-J 112 with a grade of C- or higher; or consent of department. For Groups students only. MATH-J 113 can count toward the College of Arts and Sciences Foundations requirement in mathematical modeling and the College of Arts and Sciences natural and mathematical sciences Breadth of Inquiry requirement for Groups students. A survey of calculus. Credit given for only one of MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 014, MATH-M 018, or MATH-J 111. Sets, counting, basic probability, including random variables and expected values. Linear systems, matrices, linear programming, and applications. Credit given for only one of MATH-A 118, MATH-M 118, MATH-S 118, MATH-V 118; or MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 025 or MATH-M 027. Introduction to calculus. Primarily for students from business and the social sciences. Credit given for only one of MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. (3 credit hours.)
      • R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus, and trigonometry as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 027. Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications. A student may receive credit for only one of the following: MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-V 119, MATH-M 211, or MATH-S 211. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: Placement by examination. Designed for students with one year of calculus in high school. Students completing MATH-M 213 with a final grade of A or B may receive credit for MATH-M 211. Review of material covered in MATH-M 211 followed by an intensive study of all material in MATH-M 212. Credit given for only one of MATH-M 212 or MATH-M 213. (4 credit hours.)
      • P: Hutton Honors College membership. R: To be successful students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 014, MATH-M 018, or MATH-J 111. Designed for students of outstanding ability in mathematics. Covers all material of MATH-M 118 and additional topics from statistics and game theory. Computers may be used in this course, but no previous experience is assumed. (3 credit hours.)
      • P: Hutton Honors College membership or consent of department. R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus and trigonometry as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 027. Designed for students of outstanding ability, who are considering further study in mathematics. Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications, with emphasis placed on theory. Credit given for only one of MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-S 211, or MATH-V 119. (4 credit hours.)
      • (approved topics: "Finite Math in Action"; "Finite Mathematics for the Social and Biological Sciences"; "Finite and Consumer Mathematics") R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 014, MATH-M 018, or MATH-J 111. Sets, counting, basic probability, linear modelling, and other discrete topics. Applications to various areas depending on topic. Possibilities include social and biological sciences and consumer mathematics. Credit given for only one of MATH-A 118, MATH-M 118, MATH-S 118, MATH-V 118; or MATH-D 116 and MATH-D 117. (3 credit hours.)
      • (approved topic: "Applied Brief Calculus I for the Life Sciences") R: To be successful, students will demonstrate mastery of two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geometry, and pre-calculus as indicated by an appropriate ALEKS score or completion of MATH-M 025 or MATH-M 027. Introduction to calculus. Variable topic course with emphasis on non-business topics and applications. The topic(s) will be listed in the Schedule of Classes each semester. A student may receive credit for only one of the following: MATH-J 113, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 211, MATH-S 211, or MATH-V 119. (3 credit hours.)
    2. Minor Requirement.
      • Complete one (1) of the Kelley School of Business Minors (21 cr.)** or another related minor approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
  7. GPA, Minimum Grade, and Other Requirements. Each of the following:
    1. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed in courses taken through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
    2. At least 18 credit hours in the major must be completed at the 300–499 level.
    3. Except for the GPA requirement, a grade of C- or higher is required for a course to count toward a requirement in the major.
    4. A GPA of at least 2.000 for all courses taken in the major—including those where a grade lower than C- is earned—is required.
    5. Exceptions to major requirements may be made with the approval of the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies, subject to final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Notes

  • * Courses used to fulfill addenda requirements require a grade of C- or higher and do not count toward the Major GPA or Major Hours.
  • ** Students completing the Kelley School of Business minor will be allowed to count BUS-K 201 and three (3) additional BUS credit hours toward the College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours requirement.

Bachelor of Science requirements

The Bachelor of Science degree requires at least 120 credit hours, to include the following:

  1. College of Arts and Sciences Credit Hours. At least 100 credit hours must come from College of Arts and Sciences disciplines.
  2. Upper Division Courses. At least 36 credit hours (of the 120) must be at the 300–499 level.
  3. College Residency. Following completion of the 60th credit hour toward degree, at least 36 credit hours of College of Arts and Sciences coursework must be completed through the Indiana University Bloomington campus or an IU-administered or IU co-sponsored Overseas Study program.
  4. College GPA. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 is required for all courses taken at Indiana University.
  5. CASE Requirements. The following College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) requirements must be completed:
    1. CASE Foundations
      1. English Composition: 1 course
      2. Mathematical Modeling: 1 course
    2. CASE Breadth of Inquiry
      1. Arts and Humanities: 4 courses
      2. Natural and Mathematical Sciences: 3 courses
      3. Social and Historical Studies: 4 courses
    3. CASE Culture Studies
      1. Diversity in the United States: See the CASE Foreign Language section
      2. Global Civilizations and Cultures: See the CASE Foreign Language section
    4. CASE Critical Approaches: 1 course
    5. CASE Foreign Language: Choose from:
      • A single foreign language through the second semester of the second year of college-level coursework.
      • Proficiency in a single foreign language through the second semester of the first year of college-level coursework and BOTH of the following:
        • CASE Diversity in the United States: 1 course
        • CASE Global Civilizations and Cultures: 1 course
    6. CASE Intensive Writing: 1 course
    7. CASE Public Oral Communication: 1 course
  6. Major. Completion of the major as outlined in the Major Requirements section above.